NIOSH Science Blog Posts

Extreme Heat: Are you prepared for summer work?

The approach of summer is a reminder to us all of the need to recognize, and act to prevent, the harmful effects of excessive heat. The White House has designated May 23–27, 2016, as Extreme Heat Week, during which Federal agencies will work with community planners and public health officials to enhance community preparedness for Read More >

Posted on by Brenda Jacklitsch, MS; and Joanna Watson, MSc, DPhil9 Comments

NMAM 5th Edition

Workers in various industries and occupations can face health risks from exposure to airborne chemical and biological agents. These exposures are typically measured by monitoring workplace air.  Air monitoring can also be helpful to determine the effectiveness of controls that are used to minimize worker exposures.  While inhalation is the most likely route of exposure Read More >

Posted on by Kevin Ashley, Ph.D.3 Comments

NIOSH Mine Emergency Escape Simulation Technology Available for Developers

 Background All underground coal miners in the United States receive escape training on a quarterly basis. This training prepares them for exiting the mine in the event of an emergency and it must include walking either the primary or the secondary escape route from their work area to the outside (30 CFR, 2015). As a Read More >

Posted on by Timothy J. Orr16 Comments

Suicide Among Former NFL Players

  The question of whether football players are at higher risk of suicide than the general population has been raised in the popular and scientific literature.  In 2012, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) published a paper primarily focused on death from heart disease among former National Football League (NFL) players (see Read More >

Posted on by Doug Trout, MD, MHSLeave a comment

Healthy Vision Month

  NIOSH is excited to partner with the National Institutes of Health’s National Eye Institute (NEI) to help promote Healthy Vision Month! Every May, the NEI empowers Americans to make their eye health a priority and educates them about steps they can take to protect their vision. For more on NEI’s Healthy Vision Month campaign, Read More >

Posted on by Michelle Lee, BA; Sydney Webb, PhD; L. Casey Chosewood, MD, MPH; James Grosch, PhD; Juliann Scholl, PhD; and Chia-Chia Chang, MPH, MBA5 Comments

Standing–Down to Prevent Falls in Construction

We know falls in the workplace are preventable and yet falls remain the leading cause of death in construction. As part of the effort to prevent falls in construction, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), is again partnering with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and CPWR—The Center for Construction Research and Read More >

Posted on by Elizabeth P. Garza, MPH, CPH; and Christine M. Branche, PhD, FACE 2 Comments

Are Hospital Cleaning Staff at Risk When Using a One-step Cleaner?

  Workers’ health and safety is an important consideration when choosing cleaning and disinfectant products. In health care settings, disinfection products help minimize healthcare-acquired infections.  In January 2015, the National Institute for Occupational Health (NIOSH), received a request to conduct a health hazard evaluation at a Pennsylvania hospital using a new surface cleaning product consisting Read More >

Posted on by Brie M. Hawley, PhD43 Comments

Workers Memorial Day Message 2016

  Each year we pause on April 28 for Workers Memorial Day to publicly remember the workers who died or suffered from exposures to hazards at work. While worker deaths in America are down, on average, even one death or one injury is still too many. To prevent injury, illness, and death in today’s workplaces, Read More >

Posted on by John Howard, MD 6 Comments

Measuring the Impact of Hearing Loss on Quality of Life

  Hearing loss is common in the United States. More people have hearing loss than diabetes, cancer or vision trouble. Occupational hearing loss, which is caused by exposure at work to loud noise or chemicals that damage hearing, is the most common work-related illness. It is also permanent. Read More >

Posted on by Elizabeth Masterson, PhD, CPH, COHC25 Comments

Convenience Store Compliance to Reduce Workplace Violence

  Robbery-related homicides and assaults are the leading cause of death in retail businesses. Workers in convenience stores have a 7 times higher rate of work-related homicide than workers in other industries (2 homicides per 100,000 workers vs. 0.28 per 100,000 workers). There are disparities among the homicide victims, too. Specifically, black, Asian, and Hispanic Read More >

Posted on by Cammie Chaumont Menéndez, PhD, MPH, MS, and Thomas Cunningham, PhD 9 Comments

Workplace Injury, Illness and Death- How do we know how many?

  Workers Memorial Day, April 28, is a day to reflect on how work-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths affect American workers, their families and society at large. Each year at this time NIOSH reports on the burden of workplace injury and illness (see MMWR). But how do we know how many workers died or suffered Read More >

Posted on by Kerry Souza, ScD, MPH 3 Comments

Partnering to Promote Workplace Safety and Health in Tribal Communities

Over 5.2 million American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) live across the United States. In 2013, approximately 1,319,000 AI/AN workers were employed in the U.S. workforce1,2. AI/AN workers are 42 percent more likely to be employed in a high-risk occupation (defined as an occupation where the injury and illness rate is more than twice the Read More >

Posted on by Liz Dalsey2 Comments

How Employers Can Keep Older Drivers Safe at Work

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of work-related deaths in the United States. Millions of workers, such as long-haul truck drivers, sales representatives, and home health care staff, drive or ride in a motor vehicle as part of their jobs. As our workforce ages, we need to pay special attention to the needs of Read More >

Posted on by Rosa L. Rodríguez-Acosta, PhD; Rebecca Olsavsky, MS; James Grosch, PhD; Harpriya Kaur, MPH; Bermang Ortiz, BA; and Juliann Scholl, PhD 5 Comments

Traumatic Brain Injuries in Construction

  Falling 25 feet to the ground from a roof, being struck in the head by a steel beam as it is transported across a worksite, or getting hit by a vehicle moving supplies–these are only a few examples of why the construction industry has the greatest number of both fatal[i] and nonfatal [ii] traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) Read More >

Posted on by Srinivas Konda, MPH14 Comments

Research Day 2016 Brings Together Students, Alumni, and Professionals

The 8th Annual Occupational and Environmental Health Research Day took place on March 3rd with a record number of almost 200 attendees.  Research Day is a yearly tradition, showcasing innovative graduate student research in occupational and environmental health and safety, as well as highlighting alumni experiences and connecting community members working in health and safety to students and Read More >

Posted on by Jana Gurkin2 Comments

Pi at Work

  It’s Pi Day.  Do you use π  (3.14) in the course of your work? If so, please tell us how in the comment section below. You are probably aware that the traditional way to celebrate this holiday, which also happens to be Albert Einstein’s birthday, is by eating pie.  As you enjoy your delicious desert know that Read More >

Posted on by Frank Hearl, PE6 Comments

Daylight Saving: Suggestions to help workers adapt to the time change

  Spring forward Fall back. We all know the saying to help us remember to adjust our clocks for the daylight saving time changes (this Sunday in case you are wondering). But, what can we do to help workers adjust to the effects of the time change?  A few studies have examined these issues but Read More >

Posted on by Claire Caruso, PhD, RN, FAAN15 Comments

Wearable Exoskeletons to Reduce Physical Load at Work

Robotic-like suits which provide powered assist and increase human strength may conjure thoughts of sci-fi and superhero film genres. But these wearable exoskeleton devices are now a reality and the market for their applications in the workplace is projected to increase significantly in the next five years.  As with any technologic innovation some of the Read More >

Posted on by Brian D. Lowe, PhD, CPE; Robert B. Dick, PhD, Captain USPHS (Ret.); Stephen Hudock, PhD, CSP; and Thomas Bobick, PhD, CSP, CPE 15 Comments

NIOSH Ladder Safety App Evolves with User Feedback

  The award-winning NIOSH Ladder Safety App is now updated based on our users’ feedback. First introduced in 2013, the app has received much positive feedback.  As of the end of 2015, it has more than 52,000 downloads. Among those promoting the app are state officials, industry leaders, and safety professionals. Many companies have even Read More >

Posted on by Peter Simeonov, PhD, and Rebecca Olsavsky, MS9 Comments

Black History Month: Saluting Two NIOSH Pioneers of Diversity

  During Black History Month, we celebrate the men and women of African-American heritage who have contributed so much to our nation’s leadership in the global community. At NIOSH, we recognize the importance of a diverse scientific workforce that mirrors the diversity of today’s workforce as a whole.  As we approach the third decade of Read More >

Posted on by Jenise Brassell, B.S. and Constance C. Franklin, MPA 7 Comments