Category: Motor Vehicle Safety

10 Steps Employers Can Take to Keep Young Drivers Safe

  From 2011–2019, 846 workers ages 16–24* died in motor vehicle crashes at work, accounting for 26% of all work-related deaths in this age group.1 This week, as we observe National Teen Driver Safety Week, we share recommendations to reduce these preventable deaths by keeping young workers that perform driving duties as part of their Read More >

Posted on by Rosa L. Rodríguez-Acosta, PhD; Rebecca Knuth, MS; Rebecca Guerin, PhD, CHES1 Comment

The Who, What, How and When of Implementing Fatigue Monitoring and Detection Technologies

  Worker fatigue can result from a variety of sources, such as insufficient sleep, long work hours, physical exertion and stress. Fatigue can slow down reaction times, reduce attention or concentration, limit short-term memory, and impair judgment, affecting the health and safety of workers and their co-workers1,2. Worker fatigue has contributed to catastrophic industrial events Read More >

Posted on by Kyla Retzer, MPH, Imelda Wong, PhD, and Emanuele Cauda, PhD6 Comments

Choosing the “Right” Fatigue Monitoring and Detection Technology

Fatigue can shorten concentration, slow reaction times and impair decision-making skills resulting in increased health and safety risks for workers. It has been estimated that one in five fatal motor vehicle crashes in the U.S. can be attributed to fatigue. In addition, workers with sleep problems are 62% more likely to experience a work-related injury1,2. Read More >

Posted on by Imelda Wong, PhD; Kyla Retzer, MPH; and Emanuele Cauda, PhD1 Comment

Preparing Your Fleet for Automated Vehicles

Many of us already drive personal or company vehicles with automated features such as lane departure warning and automatic emergency braking. While automation clearly improves safety, it also presents new issues for safety professionals. Companies need to integrate policies on vehicles with automated features into their current fleet safety management systems. They also need to Read More >

Posted on by Stephanie Pratt, PhD, and Rebecca Olsavsky, MS11 Comments

Improving Occupational Safety and Health in the Construction and Mining Industries

With nearly 126 million full-time U.S. workers at risk of occupational illness and injury, it is critical to prioritize our research efforts to address the most important issues. One approach used by NIOSH and its partners to establish priorities is to consider the burden, need, and impact of potential research topics. This method allows us Read More >

Posted on by Scott Earnest, PhD, PE, CSP; Eileen P. Betit and Dana R. Willmer, PhD2 Comments

Workplace Safety Communications Campaigns Should be Driven by Employer, Industry, Workflow, and Culture

Employees who drive for work face significant roadway risks, and motor vehicle crashes can devastate families, communities, and organizations. Crashes are the leading cause of workplace fatalities, with 1,252 deaths of vehicle drivers and passengers on public roads in 2016. In 2013, on-the-job crashes cost employers over $25 billion and led to 155,000 lost work Read More >

Posted on by Jennifer Alexander, Jules Payne, Sydney Webb, Stephanie Pratt, David Fosbroke, and Rebecca Olsavsky1 Comment

Using Clear Communication at NIOSH

What is clear communication? Clear communication means using familiar concepts, words, numbers, and images presented in ways that make sense to the people who need the information – your intended audience.     Why should I care about clear communication? Whether you’re communicating health messages to employers or workers, every audience has its own level Read More >

Posted on by Sydney Webb, PhD; Rebecca Olsavsky, MS; Stephanie Pratt, PhD; and Tanya Headley, MS Leave a comment

Ambulance Crash Test Methods

Ambulance crashes are a major safety concern for workers and patients. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reviewed data from 45 special crash investigations from 2001-2015, and found that 84% of EMS workers were not wearing a seat belt in the patient compartment.1 For EMS workers, wearing a seat belt can be at odds with Read More >

Posted on by Jim Green and Sydney Webb, PhD 2 Comments

National Police Week and NIOSH’s Work in Officer Safety

Peace Officers Memorial Day and National Police Week are observances that pay tribute to local, state, and Federal officers who have died or been disabled in the line of duty.  The Peace Officers Memorial Day occurs annually on May 15 which was designated by President John F. Kennedy in 1962.  National Police Week is the Read More >

Posted on by Hope M. Tiesman, PhD; Jeff Rojek, PhD; Hongwei Hsiao, PhD; Claire Caruso, PhD3 Comments

Keeping Workers Safe on the Road

Reducing deaths due to motor vehicle crashes has been one of the greatest public health achievements of the last 50 years. In 2014, the rate of crash deaths in the United States, based on miles driven, was one-fifth the rate for 1966. And, the number of deaths decreased from 50,894 in 1966 to 32,675 in Read More >

Posted on by Stephanie Pratt, PhD, and Rebecca Olsavsky, MS6 Comments

Using a Seat Belt: A safety priority on- and off-the-job

Share Roads Safely is this week’s emphasis for National Safety Month. Motor vehicle safety is an important topic in the workplace as motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of fatal injuries among workers in the United States. When it comes to reducing severity of injury or death in a crash, seat belt use can Read More >

Posted on by Rosa L. Rodriguez-Acosta, PhD and Winnie Boal, MPH3 Comments

National Safety Month

It’s National Safety Month. Each June, the National Safety Council and its partners raise awareness on preventing the leading causes of injury and death at work, on the roads and in our homes and communities.  This year’s theme is SafeForLife. Each week of June has a different focus area. In this joint blog from the Read More >

Posted on by John Howard, MD, and Kathy Lane 2 Comments

Workers Memorial Day Message 2016

  Each year we pause on April 28 for Workers Memorial Day to publicly remember the workers who died or suffered from exposures to hazards at work. While worker deaths in America are down, on average, even one death or one injury is still too many. To prevent injury, illness, and death in today’s workplaces, Read More >

Posted on by John Howard, MD 6 Comments

How Employers Can Keep Older Drivers Safe at Work

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of work-related deaths in the United States. Millions of workers, such as long-haul truck drivers, sales representatives, and home health care staff, drive or ride in a motor vehicle as part of their jobs. As our workforce ages, we need to pay special attention to the needs of Read More >

Posted on by Rosa L. Rodríguez-Acosta, PhD; Rebecca Olsavsky, MS; James Grosch, PhD; Harpriya Kaur, MPH; Bermang Ortiz, BA; and Juliann Scholl, PhD 5 Comments

Daylight Saving: Suggestions to help workers adapt to the time change

  Spring forward Fall back. We all know the saying to help us remember to adjust our clocks for the daylight saving time changes (this Sunday in case you are wondering). But, what can we do to help workers adjust to the effects of the time change?  A few studies have examined these issues but Read More >

Posted on by Claire Caruso, PhD, RN, FAAN15 Comments

How to Make Safer, More Knowledgeable Drivers—On and Off the Job

This blog was originally posted on MyCarDoesWhat.org As an employer, what can you do to help workers understand and learn how to use safety features built into vehicles they drive for work—whether you provide these vehicles, or workers drive their own vehicles? Newer vehicles have advanced safety features most of us could not have imagined Read More >

Posted on by Stephanie Pratt, PhD and Rebecca Olsavsky, MS9 Comments

NIOSH Co-hosts Motor Vehicle Safety Webinar

  Earlier this month, the NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety, together with the Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research, hosted a webinar on Occupational Research in Motor Vehicle Safety.  The webinar grew out of interest generated at the National Occupational Injury Research Symposium,  and featured presentations on organizational-level approaches to improving work-related Read More >

Posted on by Rebecca Olsavsky, MS and Stephanie Pratt, PhD6 Comments

#PlanAhead for Drive Safely Work Week 2015

  How do you plan to celebrate Drive Safely Work Week? Don’t know? Haven’t thought about it yet? Well, you are in luck. This year, we are posting our blog in advance of the annual observance that encourages safe driving on and off the job (October 5-9, 2015) to give you plenty of time to Read More >

Posted on by Rebecca Olsavsky, MS and Stephanie Pratt, PhD 2 Comments

Motor Vehicle Safety and Law Enforcement Officers

In 2010, motor-vehicle-related events accounted for approximately two out of every five fatal work injuries in the United States [BLS 2011a]. Non-fatal motor-vehicle crashes can result in serious long-term injuries, permanent disabilities, and costly medical care. Notably absent from motor-vehicle research has been research addressing the safety of law enforcement officers who not only spend Read More >

Posted on by Hope M. Tiesman, PhD7 Comments

Drive Safely Work Week 2014

The Network of Employers for Traffic Safety (NETS) is calling on leaders of companies and organizations to emphasize road safety for all employees—not just those who drive company vehicles— as a core component of the organization’s safety culture. NIOSH supports this call to action. This year, the theme of Drive Safely Work Week (DSWW), NETS’s Read More >

Posted on by Stephanie Pratt, PhD and Kwame Boafo, MPH13 Comments