NIOSH Science Blog Posts

New Curriculum Helps Workers with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Learn How to Stay Safe on the Job

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California, Berkeley recently published a curriculum to help workers who have and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) learn how to stay safe while they do their jobs. The Staying Safe at Work curriculum fills an important need for general Read More >

Posted on by Robin Dewey, MPH; Rebecca Guerin, MA; and Andrea Okun, DrPH5 Comments

Never fear! NEAT 2.0 is here! – How to perform nanomaterial exposure assessment in the workplace

Do you think you might have exposure to nanomaterials in your workplace? Never fear! NEAT 2.0 is here! Engineered nanoparticles are unique. They are generally smaller than both red blood cells and viruses, don’t weigh much, and have a great amount of surface area proportionate to their size. These particles are increasingly used in a Read More >

Posted on by Lt. Adrienne Eastlake, MS, RS/REHSLeave a comment

NIOSH’s State-of-the-Art Facility in Morgantown Celebrates 20 Years

Next week marks the 20th anniversary of the opening of the L building in Morgantown, West Virginia, an addition to the existing facility which was dedicated in 1971. This state-of-the-art National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) facility represents a commitment to occupational safety and health. The creation of the new building created over 200 new jobs in Read More >

Posted on by RADM Margaret Kitt, MD, and Tanya Headley, MS3 Comments

Reducing Whole Body Vibration to Improve the Safety and Health of Bus Drivers

On the road every day, transportation workers are responsible for the safe delivery of passengers, materials and goods across the United States. Bus drivers ensure our kids and family members arrive safely. Bus drivers are vital to our economy, but their job can put them at increased risk for health problems. In 2014, musculoskeletal disorders Read More >

Posted on by Peter W. Johnson, PhD, MS; Stephen D. Hudock, PhD, CSP; Thomas McDowell, PhD; and Elizabeth Dalsey, MA.12 Comments

Capturing Work-related Injuries from Emergency Department Data

Work-related injuries frequently occur, despite the fact that many are preventable. It is critical that we accurately describe and monitor these injuries in order to improve prevention efforts. Because there is no comprehensive data source that captures all work-related injuries, the occupational injury community relies on multiple sources to describe the problem. The occupational supplement Read More >

Posted on by Audrey Reichard, Suzanne Marsh, and Rebecca OlsavskyLeave a comment

Shift Work and Sleep

In today’s competitive economy, an increasing number of U.S. businesses operate to meet customer demand for 24/7 services. These around-the-clock operations are required in order to maintain a place in the global market where transactions with clients, suppliers, and colleagues can span multiple time zones.  Consequently, for many men and women, the workday no longer Read More >

Posted on by Geoffrey Calvert, MD, MPH, FACP11 Comments

Deepwater Horizon

With last week’s premier of the movie Deepwater Horizon, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) remembers the workers who were killed and injured in the explosion as well as the tens of thousands who worked on containment and clean up activities. NIOSH played an important role in protecting and monitoring the health and Read More >

Posted on by CDR Lisa Delaney, MS, CIH2 Comments

National Employ Older Workers Week is a Chance to Reflect on the Safety and Health Needs of Older Workers

This last full week of September is National Employ Older Workers Week. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the week “recognizes the vital role of older workers in the workforce … and aims to increase awareness of this labor segment and develop innovative strategies to tap it.” In observance of this event, join us Read More >

Posted on by Bermang Ortiz, BA and Juliann Scholl, PhD5 Comments

Celebrating National Farm Safety and Health Week: Farm Safety: A Legacy to Be Proud Of

September 18-24, 2016, is National Farm Safety and Health Week (NFSHW). This annual event, begun by the National Safety Council in 1944, promotes safe and healthy practices on farms and ranches around the U.S. Agriculture is among our most hazardous industries, with a work-related fatal injury rate of 25.6 deaths per 100,000 workers annually, according Read More >

Posted on by Scott Heiberger16 Comments

Using Occupation and Industry Information to Better Serve Your Patient Population

Conditions in the places where people live, learn, work, and play affect a wide range of health risks and outcomes. On average, American workers spend close to half their waking hours at work. As a result, work can have significant impacts on health. As electronic health records (EHRs) are replacing paper medical records in most Read More >

Posted on by Debbie Hoyer, MPH, Nicole Edwards, MS, Christina Socias-Morales, DrPH4 Comments

Hear and Now: The Noise Safety Challenge

The Burden of Noise The idea of being hurt on the job tends to produce images of harrowing trauma, broken bones, and blood. Yet every year for more than a quarter of a century, hearing loss has quietly been among the most prevalent occupational health concerns in the United States. Approximately 22 million U.S. workers Read More >

Posted on by Garrett Burnett, MS, MBA6 Comments

N95 Day 2016: Proper Use, Filtration, and Fit – The Three-Legged Stool of Respiratory Protection

Dear N95 Day enthusiast – We want to thank you for joining us for another year of N95 respiratory protection information celebration. We know – today is 9/6, not 9/5. But we hope that many of you enjoyed the Labor Day holiday yesterday and are rested and ready for our annual N95 Day holiday today! Read More >

Posted on by Jaclyn Krah and Ronald Shaffer7 Comments

Labor Day 2016: A Statement by NIOSH Director John Howard, MD

To many, Labor Day signifies the end of summer vacations, the beginning of a new school year or a time to find bargains. It’s important to remember Labor Day is much more than just a retail holiday or a day off of work. We must not forget it is a day to celebrate workers—from teachers Read More >

Posted on by John Howard, M.D.2 Comments

Keeping Workers Safe on the Road

Reducing deaths due to motor vehicle crashes has been one of the greatest public health achievements of the last 50 years. In 2014, the rate of crash deaths in the United States, based on miles driven, was one-fifth the rate for 1966. And, the number of deaths decreased from 50,894 in 1966 to 32,675 in Read More >

Posted on by Stephanie Pratt, PhD, and Rebecca Olsavsky, MS6 Comments

Where do you get your information? A survey of occupational safety and health practitioners

  CPWR – The Center for Construction Research and Training receives NIOSH funding under a competitively awarded cooperative agreement that supports an extensive research program in occupational safety and health for the building industry. CPWR-supported researchers pursue original research in fields such as safety culture and climate, engineering controls for airborne silica and welding fumes, Read More >

Posted on by Clayton Sinyai 3 Comments

Cardiovascular Health Status by Occupational Group

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is responsible for 1 out of every 3 deaths in the United States, making it the leading cause of death. CVD illness and death accounts for an estimated $120 billion dollars of lost productivity in the workplace. With approximately 55% of Americans employed, the workplace is an important factor to consider in Read More >

Posted on by Taylor M. Shockey, MPH3 Comments

Olympic Work

As Olympic fever takes hold, we would like to take the opportunity to highlight research from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) that relates directly or indirectly to the athletes or their events. NIOSH has the responsibility of conducting research and making recommendations to prevent work-related injuries and illnesses. Although Olympic competition Read More >

Posted on by Julie Tisdale Pardi 7 Comments

Workplace Medical Mystery Solved: Influenza-like Illness strikes Worker at Wildlife Refuge

Just before entering veterinary school, Michelle found a summer job at a wildlife refuge. She spent most of her time caring for Asian and African elephants until she came down with what she thought was the flu. Had she been around anyone who was sick? Had she travelled anywhere recently? Michelle’s doctor needed to ask Read More >

Posted on by Stephanie Stevens, MA2 Comments

Workplace Medical Mystery: Influenza-like Illness strikes Worker at Wildlife Refuge

Michelle was thrilled to have landed a job at a wildlife refuge in the Ohio River Valley the summer before she started veterinary school. She hoped to specialize in zoological medicine and work with zoo animals. Three months into her summer job, Michelle came down with the flu—or so she thought. An animal lover, Michelle Read More >

Posted on by Stephanie Stevens, MA16 Comments

NIOSH’s Engineering Controls Database

The hierarchy of controls shows us that engineering controls can protect workers by eliminating or reducing hazardous conditions to acceptable exposure levels. The idea behind the hierarchy is that the control methods at the top of the graphic are potentially more effective and protective than those at the bottom. Following the hierarchy of controls can Read More >

Posted on by Brennan Lockwood and Trudi McCleery, MPH12 Comments