NIOSH Science Blog Posts

Partnering to Promote Workplace Safety and Health in Tribal Communities

Over 5.2 million American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) live across the United States. In 2013, approximately 1,319,000 AI/AN workers were employed in the U.S. workforce1,2. AI/AN workers are 42 percent more likely to be employed in a high-risk occupation (defined as an occupation where the injury and illness rate is more than twice the Read More >

Posted on by Liz Dalsey2 Comments

How Employers Can Keep Older Drivers Safe at Work

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of work-related deaths in the United States. Millions of workers, such as long-haul truck drivers, sales representatives, and home health care staff, drive or ride in a motor vehicle as part of their jobs. As our workforce ages, we need to pay special attention to the needs of Read More >

Posted on by Rosa L. Rodríguez-Acosta, PhD; Rebecca Olsavsky, MS; James Grosch, PhD; Harpriya Kaur, MPH; Bermang Ortiz, BA; and Juliann Scholl, PhD 5 Comments

Traumatic Brain Injuries in Construction

  Falling 25 feet to the ground from a roof, being struck in the head by a steel beam as it is transported across a worksite, or getting hit by a vehicle moving supplies–these are only a few examples of why the construction industry has the greatest number of both fatal[i] and nonfatal [ii] traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) Read More >

Posted on by Srinivas Konda, MPH14 Comments

Research Day 2016 Brings Together Students, Alumni, and Professionals

The 8th Annual Occupational and Environmental Health Research Day took place on March 3rd with a record number of almost 200 attendees.  Research Day is a yearly tradition, showcasing innovative graduate student research in occupational and environmental health and safety, as well as highlighting alumni experiences and connecting community members working in health and safety to students and Read More >

Posted on by Jana Gurkin2 Comments

Pi at Work

  It’s Pi Day.  Do you use π  (3.14) in the course of your work? If so, please tell us how in the comment section below. You are probably aware that the traditional way to celebrate this holiday, which also happens to be Albert Einstein’s birthday, is by eating pie.  As you enjoy your delicious desert know that Read More >

Posted on by Frank Hearl, PE6 Comments

Daylight Saving: Suggestions to help workers adapt to the time change

  Spring forward Fall back. We all know the saying to help us remember to adjust our clocks for the daylight saving time changes (this Sunday in case you are wondering). But, what can we do to help workers adjust to the effects of the time change?  A few studies have examined these issues but Read More >

Posted on by Claire Caruso, PhD, RN, FAAN15 Comments

Wearable Exoskeletons to Reduce Physical Load at Work

Robotic-like suits which provide powered assist and increase human strength may conjure thoughts of sci-fi and superhero film genres. But these wearable exoskeleton devices are now a reality and the market for their applications in the workplace is projected to increase significantly in the next five years.  As with any technologic innovation some of the Read More >

Posted on by Brian D. Lowe, PhD, CPE; Robert B. Dick, PhD, Captain USPHS (Ret.); Stephen Hudock, PhD, CSP; and Thomas Bobick, PhD, CSP, CPE 15 Comments

NIOSH Ladder Safety App Evolves with User Feedback

  The award-winning NIOSH Ladder Safety App is now updated based on our users’ feedback. First introduced in 2013, the app has received much positive feedback.  As of the end of 2015, it has more than 52,000 downloads. Among those promoting the app are state officials, industry leaders, and safety professionals. Many companies have even Read More >

Posted on by Peter Simeonov, PhD, and Rebecca Olsavsky, MS9 Comments

Black History Month: Saluting Two NIOSH Pioneers of Diversity

  During Black History Month, we celebrate the men and women of African-American heritage who have contributed so much to our nation’s leadership in the global community. At NIOSH, we recognize the importance of a diverse scientific workforce that mirrors the diversity of today’s workforce as a whole.  As we approach the third decade of Read More >

Posted on by Jenise Brassell, B.S. and Constance C. Franklin, MPA 7 Comments

Occupational Exposure Limits – State of the Science

  The process of developing and using occupational exposure limits is a cornerstone of industrial hygiene practice, with a history dating back to the 1880s. Occupational exposure limits, known as OELs, have not—until recently—evolved enough to reflect the advances in related sciences of toxicology, risk assessment, and exposure assessment. Much of the pioneering effort to Read More >

Posted on by Thomas J. Lentz, Ph.D.; Scott Dotson, Ph.D. and Deborah Hornback, MS6 Comments

How to Put Leading Indicators into Practice

  The use of leading indicators is a growing hot topic in occupational and environmental health and safety. The Campbell Institute at the National Safety Council has been studying leading indicators for the past two years to help more organizations take advantage of their predictive power. The Institute defines leading indicators as proactive, preventive, and Read More >

Posted on by Joy Inouye12 Comments

The Importance of High Standards: A Valentine’s Day Message about Closed-Circuit Escape Respirators

  We here at NIOSH LOVE respirators. That’s why every Valentine’s day, we blog about important respirator considerations. It’s our version of an information-packed love letter. In 2014 we discussed essential maintenance tips for self-contained self-rescuers (SCSRs), also known as closed-circuit escape respirators (CCERs). Since that blog entry, the implementation of a new CCER standard Read More >

Posted on by Jaclyn Krah, MA Leave a comment

How to Make Safer, More Knowledgeable Drivers—On and Off the Job

This blog was originally posted on MyCarDoesWhat.org As an employer, what can you do to help workers understand and learn how to use safety features built into vehicles they drive for work—whether you provide these vehicles, or workers drive their own vehicles? Newer vehicles have advanced safety features most of us could not have imagined Read More >

Posted on by Stephanie Pratt, PhD and Rebecca Olsavsky, MS9 Comments

Understanding Noise Exposure Limits: Occupational vs. General Environmental Noise

Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is 100% preventable; however, once acquired, it is permanent and irreversible [NIOSH 1998]. Understanding and minimizing the risks associated with noise exposures are the keys to preventing noise-related hearing loss.  NIOSH has a long history of leadership in conducting research, advancing control measures, and recommending noise-exposure limits to prevent job-related hearing Read More >

Posted on by Chuck Kardous, MS, PE; Christa L. Themann, MA, CCC-A; Thais C. Morata, Ph.D. and W. Gregory Lotz, Ph.D. 46 Comments

Coffee Workers at Risk for Lung Disease

  Obliterative bronchiolitis, an irreversible form of lung disease in which the smallest airways in the lung (the bronchioles) become scarred and constricted, blocking the movement of air, was previously identified in flavoring manufacturing workers and microwave popcorn workers who were occupationally exposed to diacetyl (2,3-butanedione) or butter flavorings containing diacetyl. Now, NIOSH research finds Read More >

Posted on by Rachel L. Bailey, DO, MPH; Ryan F. LeBouf, PhD, CIH; and Kristin J. Cummings, MD, MPH 10 Comments

New NIOSH Study Supports the OSHA Annual Fit Testing Requirements for Filtering Facepiece Respirators

  Results of a recently completed NIOSH study confirm the necessity of the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) respirator fit testing requirement, both annually and when physical changes have occurred. The study’s conclusions emphasize that respirator users who have lost more than 20 pounds should be re-tested to be sure that the current Read More >

Posted on by Ziqing Zhuang, PhD; Michael Bergman, MS; and Jaclyn Krah, MA11 Comments

The Opioid Overdose Epidemic and the Workplace

  Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released troubling statistics on the growing epidemic of drug and opioid overdose deaths in the United States.  The origins of this epidemic have been linked to prescription opioids.  While it is unknown how many drug and opioid overdose deaths are associated with workplace injuries and Read More >

Posted on by Dawn Castillo, MPH and John Howard, MD42 Comments

Holiday Gifts from NIOSH

If you are lucky enough to get some time off over the holidays, you may find yourself looking for something to listen to, watch, or read.  Our gift to you this holiday season is a compilation of the songs, movies and books with workplace safety and health themes that we have collected through the NIOSH Science Read More >

Posted on by Blog Coordinator9 Comments

Movies with Workplace Safety and Health Themes

The 33 2015, Patricia Riggen IMDb rating: 7.0 From IMDb: Based on the real-life event, when a gold and copper mine collapses, it traps 33 miners underground for 69 days. 42nd Street 1933, Lloyd Bacon IMDb rating: 7.7 From our readers: The film has an interesting final image: a drawing of a theatre curtain that Read More >

Posted on by Blog Coordinator

Books with Workplace Safety and Health Themes

Ahab’s Wife Sena Jeter Naslund (1999) From our readers: A novel written about the wife of Ahab of Moby Dick.  She disquises herself as a cabin boy and works on a whaling ship. Animal’s People Indra Sinha– (2007) From our readers: A fictional novel about a boy who was born just before the Bhopal environmental Read More >

Posted on by Blog Coordinator