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Category: Occupational Health Equity

Towards a Biosocial Approach to Occupational Safety and Health

The integration of the social determinants of health paradigm by occupational and public health researchers and institutions is leading to a recognition of the need for a more holistic and nuanced perspective on work and its impact on population health (Ahonen et al 2018; Schulte and Vainio, 2010; WHO 2008). Fundamental to this transformation is Read More >

Posted on by Michael Flynn, MA3 Comments

Safety Across Cultures

As businesses become more global, safety professionals must develop and carry out work-based safety programs in cross-cultural settings. A recent article in Professional Safety, “Safety Across Cultures: Understanding the Challenges,” discusses the challenges of cross-cultural safety and health and offers suggestions on how to approach these growing responsibilities. Occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals work Read More >

Posted on by Michael Flynn, MA5 Comments

Opportunities to Advance Occupational Health Research by Considering Work as a Social Determinant of Health

The role of work in creating health disparities has not been fully explored in studies in the United States. This might be because of a narrow perception of the relationships between work and health. A recent article by a researcher from the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and NIOSH researchers explores additional avenues for improving health Read More >

Posted on by Kaori Fujishiro, PhD7 Comments

Job Complexity, Race, and Socioeconomic Status: Examining Health Disparities from an Occupational Perspective

Research conducted in the United States on racial/ethnic health disparities and socioeconomic status (SES) has not fully considered occupation. Because racial and ethnic groups are not represented equally in all occupations, differences in job characteristics may help explain racial/ethnic health disparities.  Two recent studies by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) explore Read More >

Posted on by Kaori Fujishiro, PhD 3 Comments

New Curriculum Helps Workers with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Learn How to Stay Safe on the Job

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California, Berkeley recently published a curriculum to help workers who have and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) learn how to stay safe while they do their jobs. The Staying Safe at Work curriculum fills an important need for general Read More >

Posted on by Robin Dewey, MPH; Rebecca Guerin, MA; and Andrea Okun, DrPH5 Comments

Convenience Store Compliance to Reduce Workplace Violence

  Robbery-related homicides and assaults are the leading cause of death in retail businesses. Workers in convenience stores have a 7 times higher rate of work-related homicide than workers in other industries (2 homicides per 100,000 workers vs. 0.28 per 100,000 workers). There are disparities among the homicide victims, too. Specifically, black, Asian, and Hispanic Read More >

Posted on by Cammie Chaumont Menéndez, PhD, MPH, MS, and Thomas Cunningham, PhD 9 Comments

Partnering to Promote Workplace Safety and Health in Tribal Communities

Over 5.2 million American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) live across the United States. In 2013, approximately 1,319,000 AI/AN workers were employed in the U.S. workforce1,2. AI/AN workers are 42 percent more likely to be employed in a high-risk occupation (defined as an occupation where the injury and illness rate is more than twice the Read More >

Posted on by Liz Dalsey2 Comments

Black History Month: Saluting Two NIOSH Pioneers of Diversity

  During Black History Month, we celebrate the men and women of African-American heritage who have contributed so much to our nation’s leadership in the global community. At NIOSH, we recognize the importance of a diverse scientific workforce that mirrors the diversity of today’s workforce as a whole.  As we approach the third decade of Read More >

Posted on by Jenise Brassell, B.S. and Constance C. Franklin, MPA 7 Comments
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