Category: Exposure

Occupational Exposure Banding and Workplace Chemicals

For workers in a variety of industries, exposure to chemicals is commonplace. American workers handle, transport, or encounter thousands of chemicals every day, from cleaning products to industrial solvents. Although many of these chemicals have important uses, they can also be harmful to workers who are exposed to them. Occupational exposure limits (OELs) are developed Read More >

Posted on by Melissa Seaton, MS, and Thomas J. Lentz, PhD1 Comment

Help Us Redesign the NIOSH Pocket Guide

The NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards (NPG) celebrates its 40th anniversary in 2018. The guide continues to be the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s (NIOSH) most popular document. It provides descriptive information such as recommendations for exposure limits, protective clothing, and first aid measures for 677 chemicals commonly found in the work Read More >

Posted on by Naomi Hudson, Dr.P.H, and Donna Van Bogaert, Ph.D. 74 Comments

The Art and Science of OELs for Nanomaterials

This guest blog post from our Finnish colleagues summarizes the challenges of identifying OELs for new nanomaterials as part of the development of a WHO guideline for working safely with nanomaterials.   Engineered nanomaterials are fascinating. Just by making stuff smaller researchers have discovered forms of materials and even completely new materials that can be Read More >

Posted on by Jos Verbeek and Raluca Mihalache 9 Comments

Never fear! NEAT 2.0 is here! – How to perform nanomaterial exposure assessment in the workplace

Do you think you might have exposure to nanomaterials in your workplace? Never fear! NEAT 2.0 is here! Engineered nanoparticles are unique. They are generally smaller than both red blood cells and viruses, don’t weigh much, and have a great amount of surface area proportionate to their size. These particles are increasingly used in a Read More >

Posted on by Lt. Adrienne Eastlake, MS, RS/REHSLeave a comment

NMAM 5th Edition

Workers in various industries and occupations can face health risks from exposure to airborne chemical and biological agents. These exposures are typically measured by monitoring workplace air.  Air monitoring can also be helpful to determine the effectiveness of controls that are used to minimize worker exposures.  While inhalation is the most likely route of exposure Read More >

Posted on by Kevin Ashley, Ph.D.3 Comments

Can Workplace Exposures Increase Risks of Birth Defects? – Epidemiology in Action

Epidemiology is the art and science of using data to answer questions about the health of groups. In occupational epidemiology, we use that data to understand how work affects health. This blog entry is part of a series that shares the stories behind the data. Pregnant and breastfeeding women get a lot of advice from Read More >

Posted on by Carissa M. Rocheleau, PhD8 Comments

A Health and Safety Evaluation at an Airline Catering Facility

  The airline industry predicts that more than 24 million people will fly during the Thanksgiving holiday this year. If you are one of those passengers, chances are that you’ll have a snack or a soda on your way to your destination. Before reaching your seat, those snacks, beverages, and meals are prepared, assembled, and Read More >

Posted on by Jessica Ramsey,MS,CPE and Kristin Musolin,DO,MS9 Comments

Help! What do you want from a mobile Pocket Guide?

Since its first printing in 1978, the NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards (NPG) continues to be the Institute’s most popular document. The NPG provides general descriptive, exposure, and protective and emergency recommendations for 677 chemicals commonly found in the work environment. Workers, employers, and occupational health professionals all use the NPG in the course Read More >

Posted on by Donna Van Bogaert Ph.D. and Glenn Doyle157 Comments

Dangers of Bathtub Refinishing

At least 14 workers have died since 2000 as a result of using stripping agents containing methylene chloride during bathtub refinishing.  Many stripping products (including those that may also be available to consumers) contain high percentages of methylene chloride. Methylene chloride is extremely dangerous when not used properly.  Alternative products and processes exist for bathtub Read More >

Posted on by Ronald M. Hall, CDR, USPHS, MS, CIH, CSP 156 Comments

Catching the Flu: NIOSH Research on Airborne Influenza Transmission

As we enter another influenza season, one question continues to vex medical and public health professionals:  How do you stop people from catching the flu? The best way to prevent the flu is by getting an influenza vaccine every year. However, in the event of a large-scale influenza outbreak of a new virus strain or Read More >

Posted on by William G. Lindsley, PhD 35 Comments

Safety and Health in the Theater: Keeping Tragedy out of the Comedies…and Musicals…and Dramas

On Sunday, the 2012 Tony Awards celebrated the year’s best offerings from “The Great White Way.”  While the theater provides entertainment, the preparation and production of live performances can also pose hazards to those working in all aspects of the theater –from actors on stage to set designers behind the scenes and musicians in the Read More >

Posted on by Gregory A. Burr, CIH and Deborah Hornback, MS37 Comments

Help Wanted: Spray Polyurethane Foam Insulation Research

Help NIOSH with our research. We need you if you are in the spray foam business. Spray foam contains vapors with unknown health implications. Our researchers are taking air samples at worksites where spray foam is being installed. This research will help us develop interventions to help keep workers healthy. Read More >

Posted on by David A. Marlow, BS25 Comments

Hair, Formaldehyde, and Industrial Hygiene

A recent settlement requires the makers of Brazilian Blowout hair straightener to warn consumers and hair stylists about formaldehyde in their products. Read more from guest blogger, Dede Montgomery on how the Center for Research on Occupational and Environmental Toxicology at Oregon Health and Science University worked with their partners to raise awareness of this issue.  Read More >

Posted on by Dede Montgomery164 Comments

Bed Bugs!

Bed Bugs! If you've got them, you don't want them. But be careful. The insecticides used to get rid of bed bugs can cause serious illness. Learn about effective bed bug management (including non-chemical solutions).  Read More >

Posted on by John Howard, MD, Naomi Hudson, DrPH, MPH, and Geoffrey Calvert, MD, MPH, FACP57 Comments

Keeping Workers Hydrated and Cool Despite the Heat

Many areas of the country have been experiencing extreme temperatures this summer, and sadly the news has been full of stories about the lives lost due to heat stroke.  Read More >

Posted on by Brenda Jacklitsch, MS36 Comments

Skin…Exposed!

Dermal exposures are often given a back seat when chemicals are tested for toxicity or personal protective equipment is designed. However, skin diseases account for 15-20% of all reported occupational diseases in the United States. They result in costs estimated at $1 billion annually.  Read More >

Posted on by Scott Dotson, PhD, and Garrett Burnett, MS, MBA18 Comments

H1N1: Protecting Healthcare Workers

As of July 31, 2009, there were 162,380 documented cases of human infection with H1N1 throughout the world, including the United States. As of August 6, 2009, there were 6,506 hospitalized cases and 436 deaths in the U.S. From the time of its emergence earlier this year, H1N1 has prompted a concerted response from health agencies. Read More >

Posted on by Maryann D'Alessandro, PhD, and Ed Fries54 Comments

Take Aim at Protecting Yourself

If you work or train regularly at indoor firing ranges, you could be exposed to hazardous levels of lead and noise. An estimated 16,000–18,000 indoor firing ranges operate in the United States.  Read More >

Posted on by Chucri A. Kardous, MS, PE68 Comments

Multifaceted Approach to Assess Indoor Environmental Quality

Indoor work environments have changed. However, many questions remain regarding occupational asthma and work-exacerbated asthma and the indoor environment. What are the irritants/sensitizers that cause these diseases? Can they be controlled? What is the actual physiological mechanism? What are the actual exposures in the workplace? Read More >

Posted on by Ray Wells, PhD68 Comments

Nail Salon Table Evaluation

NIOSH is requesting that developers, manufacturers, and vendors of vented nail tables (VNTs) submit new, unused, downdraft VNTs for a free evaluation. The NIOSH research will include an evaluation of VNT airflow and capture characteristics, noise level, ergonomic features, and filter life. Results of the research and recommendations from NIOSH will be communicated back to the submitter with the hope of providing valuable information for maximizing the efficiency of VNTs. Read More >

Posted on by Administrator26 CommentsTags