NIOSH Science Blog Posts

NIOSH in Cincinnati-A Pictorial History Part 1

NIOSH in Cincinnati – How did it happen, and what has it looked like? How did federal industrial hygiene and occupational (and environmental) health research and service come to Cincinnati, and why did it stay? Interconnected stories of events, locations, buildings and artifacts provide glimpses of federal staff in Cincinnati investigating occupational health concerns and Read More >

Posted on by Barbara L. Jenkins, MA, CA3 Comments

Santa’s Workshop Keeps Spirits Bright with Total Worker Health Strategies

Before the stockings are hung by the chimney with care, everyone in the North Pole is busy preparing for the big night. Elves build toys at an escalating pace to help Santa stock up for the holiday. Santa’s Workshop may be magical but, like many workplaces, safety and health hazards can still be present. Fortunately, Read More >

Posted on by L. Casey Chosewood, MD, MPH, and Emily Kirby, BPH2 Comments

Learning from Workplace Fatality Investigations

  Each day, on average, 15 U.S. workers die as a result of a traumatic injury on the job. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) program is a research program designed to identify and study fatal occupational injuries. For nearly 40 years, the FACE program has Read More >

Posted on by Jeff Funke, MS, CSP, and Nancy T. Romano, MS, CSHMLeave a comment

Workplace Violence Research

  In the 1980’s a series of shootings at post offices drew public attention towards the issue of workplace violence. While mass shootings receive a lot of media attention, they actually account for a small number of workplace violence events. NIOSH has been studying workplace violence since the 1980s. In 1993, NIOSH released the document Read More >

Posted on by Dawn Castillo, MPH; Cammie Chaumont Menéndez, PhD, MPH, MS; Dan Hartley, EdD; Suzanne Marsh, MPA; Tim Pizatella, MSIE; Marilyn Ridenour, BSN, MPH; and Hope M. Tiesman, PhD19 Comments

Respiratory Health Research at NIOSH

  The history of protecting workers’ respiratory health pre-dates the creation of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).  In 1967 the Appalachian Laboratory for Occupational Respiratory Disease (ALFORD) was established within the U.S. Public Health Service (see related blog). ALFORD subsequently joined NIOSH in 1971, became the Division of Respiratory Disease Studies Read More >

Posted on by Kristin J. Cummings, MD, MPH; Douglas O. Johns, M.S., Ph.D; Jacek Mazurek, MD, MS, PhD; Frank J. Hearl, SM, PE; and David N. Weissman, MDLeave a comment

30 Years of the NIOSH Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing Program

  As NIOSH celebrates half a century of work in occupational safety and health, the Institute’s Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing (AgFF) Program reflects on 30 years of research and outreach designed to protect the people who produce our nation’s food and fiber. The AgFF Program began in response to a rise of farmer safety concerns Read More >

Posted on by Marcy Harrington, MPA; Amanda Wickman, MBA; Donjanea Williams, EdD; and Jennifer M. Lincoln, PhD6 Comments

Musculoskeletal Disorders Research at NIOSH

Throughout its 50 years, NIOSH has been at the forefront of efforts to protect workers from musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).  MSDs were recognized as having occupational causes as early as the beginning of the 18th century. However, it was not until the 1970’s that occupational factors were examined using epidemiologic methods, and the work-relatedness of these Read More >

Posted on by Jack Lu, PhD, CPE, and Julie Tisdale-Pardi, MALeave a comment

Center for Direct Reading and Sensor Technologies

  The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s (NIOSH)  Center for Direct Reading and Sensor Technologies is the centralized hub for all things related to sensor and direct reading technology. The Center coordinates internal and external research to develop recommendations for 21st century sensing technologies in occupational safety and health. Established in 2014, the Read More >

Posted on by Emanuele Cauda, PhD, and John Snawder, PhD, DABTLeave a comment

Evolution of the NIOSH Logo

The NIOSH logo is recognized by workers, employers, and safety and health professionals worldwide. When the logo appears on a document, website, certified respirator, or other product it tells the user that the information or product is backed by NIOSH state-of-the-art research and expertise. The NIOSH logo has evolved over time. Figure 1 shows a Read More >

Posted on by Julie Tisdale-Pardi, MA1 Comment

The OSH Act—A Response to Workplace Tragedies

  As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), we have highlighted many of the NIOSH successes and accomplishments through the years. This is also a time for reflection and looking back at our history. The roots of U.S. occupational safety and health regulation date back to Read More >

Posted on by Cheryl Lynn Hamilton, M.Ed.2 Comments

NOIRS

For almost 25 years, the National Occupational Injury Research Symposium (NOIRS) has been the only forum focused on work-related acute traumatic injury research. NOIRS provides an invaluable platform for researchers, academicians, labor union representatives, safety professionals, industry leaders, and students from a variety of disciplines and fields to showcase innovative and state-of-the-art approaches to occupational Read More >

Posted on by Christine R. Schuler, PhD; Jim Collins, PhD, MSME; Dawn Castillo, MPH; Tim Pizatella, MSIE; and Christina Socias-Morales, DrPHLeave a comment

Students’ Contributions to Wikipedia: Making it easier for everyone to find, understand, and use health information

  In 2018, we blogged about an exciting partnership between NIOSH and university graduate programs to improve occupational safety and health information on Wikipedia (see related blog). Using the Wiki Education platform and in coordination with NIOSH researchers, 15 courses were taught since 2016 involving 163 students at seven universities. The impact of these courses Read More >

Posted on by Thais Morata, PhD, and John P. Sadowski, PhD2 Comments

Health Hazard Evaluation Program

The Occupational Safety and Health Act gives NIOSH the authority to conduct evaluations at workplaces to identify potential workplace hazards. Through the NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) Program employees, employers, and union representatives can request an evaluation of potential health hazards in their workplace. The evaluations are done at no cost to the requestor or Read More >

Posted on by HHE ProgramLeave a comment

COPD Awareness

November is National COPD Awareness Month and November 17, 2021 is World COPD Day. This year’s theme, “Healthy Lungs – Never More Important,” highlights that even during the COVID pandemic, COPD remains a leading cause of death worldwide and it remains important to focus on lung health. COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is a Read More >

Posted on by Girija Syamlal, MBBS, MPH3 Comments

Extinguishing the Risk of Forever Chemicals: State of the science to protect first responders

Forever Chemicals, aptly named because they are resistant to breaking down, are artificially produced chemicals used to enhance everyday products like stain resistant clothing and furniture, cosmetics, and food packaging material. Scientists refer to them as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). PFAS includes thousands of individual compounds that have been used worldwide since the early Read More >

Posted on by Susan M. Moore, PhD; Miriam Calkins, PhD, MS; Stacey Anderson, PhD; Crystal Forester, MS; and Meghan Kiederer, BA4 Comments

Researching Risk of Birth Defects Among Pregnant Nail Salon Workers and Hairdressers

Workers at Risk There are currently around 400,000 active nail technician licenses and roughly 600,000 employed hairdressers in the United States. Most of these workers are women of reproductive age, and many are foreign-born or people of color. Nail technicians often work in environments where haircare services are also provided. Nail and hair salon workers Read More >

Posted on by Kristen Van Buren, MPH; Miriam Siegel, DrPH, MPH; Carissa Rocheleau, PhD; and Kendra Broadwater, MPH, CIH3 Comments

Bruceton Research Center – Protecting Workers for 110 Years

The Bruceton Research Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, has a long and storied history going back more than a century. Today, two NIOSH divisions conduct extensive research in this location – the NIOSH National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory (NPPTL) and the NIOSH Pittsburgh Mining Research Division (PMRD). This site is also home to an office of Read More >

Posted on by Evan Lybrand, MA, and Valerie C.L. Coughanour, MA, MFA1 Comment

Exploring the Future of Worker Health and Safety in the Post-Pandemic World

COVID-19 has had a profound effect on work. The short-term consequences of the pandemic, including new safety requirements at work, mandatory remote work arrangements, reduced working hours, and even unplanned furloughs or lost jobs, were unexpected and severe for many workers around the world [1-3]. Though the economy is now showing signs of recovery, experts Read More >

Posted on by Sarah A Felknor, MS, DrPH; Jessica MK Streit, MS, PhD, CHES®; and Nicole T Edwards, MS3 Comments

Transformation of H&S Real-time Sensors Data into Information and Knowledge: Experiences, Future Needs, and Applied Processes

  Data is the oil of the 21st century [1] and the key component of the fourth industrial revolution. Data will affect every aspect of life, including the workplace. In the workplace, sensors used for production, optimization, logistic, quality control, and health and safety are the among the largest contributors of data. Like oil, data Read More >

Posted on by Emanuele Cauda, PhD; Eelco Kuijpers, PhD; and Jean-Philippe Gorce, PhDLeave a comment

50 Years of NIOSH and 30 Years of NIOSH in Alaska

For the past 30 years, NIOSH has operated a small research office in Anchorage, Alaska. The NIOSH Division of Safety Research established the Alaska Field Station in 1991 to address the high rate of occupational fatalities among workers in the state. Surveillance from 1980-1989 showed Alaska had the highest rate of occupational fatality in the Read More >

Posted on by Theodore D. Teske, MA; CAPT Ryan Hill, MPH; CAPT Mary O’Connor, MS; and Devin Lucas, PhD3 Comments