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NIOSH Science Blog Posts

Can Drones Make Construction Safer?

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) often called drones are increasingly used for military, recreational, public, and commercial purposes. UAVs have the potential to prevent injury and death in the construction industry where nearly 1,000 workers died in 2015. Advancements in UAV technology could help reduce construction-related injury and death from falls, toxic chemical exposures, electrical hazards, Read More >

Posted on by John Howard, MD; Vladimir Murashov, PhD; and Christine Branche, PhD, FACE10 Comments

Job Complexity, Race, and Socioeconomic Status: Examining Health Disparities from an Occupational Perspective

Research conducted in the United States on racial/ethnic health disparities and socioeconomic status (SES) has not fully considered occupation. Because racial and ethnic groups are not represented equally in all occupations, differences in job characteristics may help explain racial/ethnic health disparities.  Two recent studies by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) explore Read More >

Posted on by Kaori Fujishiro, PhD 3 Comments

New Software Tracks Health of Emergency Responders

As we recognize September as National Preparedness Month, U.S. and international emergency personnel have been overwhelmed with responses to the hurricanes, floods, earthquakes and wildfires experienced in this month alone. While these responders often put their lives on the line for public safety, we at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) together Read More >

Posted on by CDR Jill Shugart, MSPH, REHS1 Comment

Cured-in-Place-Pipe (CIPP): Inhalation and Dermal Exposure Risks Associated with Sanitary Sewer, Storm Sewer, and Drinking Water Pipe Repairs

Background Cured-in-place-pipe (CIPP) is the most popular water pipe repair method used in the U.S. for sanitary sewer, storm sewer, and is increasingly being used for drinking water pipe repairs. Today, approximately 50% of all damaged pipes are being repaired using CIPP technology. The CIPP procedure involves the chemical manufacture of a new plastic pipe Read More >

Posted on by Andrew J. Whelton, PhD; Jonathan Shannahan, PhD; Brandon E. Boor, PhD; John A. Howarter, PhD; Jeffrey P. Youngblood, PhD; and Chad T. Jafvert, PhD. 4 Comments
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