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10 results for colorectal cancer

Stool-based Colorectal Cancer Screening in the COVID-19 Era

a figure with the colon highlighted and a COVID-19 virus

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to exact a devastating public health toll and in many indirect ways. While people work from home and avoid social contact, many may also be skipping important preventive care. Findings released in May of 2020 indicated a drop of between 86% and 94% in preventive cancer screenings in 2020 compared with

Posted on by W. David Dotson, Muin J. Khoury, M. Scott Bowen Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Office of Science; & Nicole F. Dowling, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health PromotionLeave a commentTags

Should polygenic risk scores be used in risk-stratified colorectal cancer screening?

a polygenic risk score bell and a body with a colon being exposed

Polygenic risk scores (PRS) summarize information about a person’s disease risk based on numerous DNA variants in their genome. Each variant confers very little increase in disease risk. But composite (or polygenic) risk scores made up of a number of such variants have been shown to stratify people to normal distributions of disease risks for

Posted on by W. David Dotson, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Office of Science; Nicole F. Dowling, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; & Muin J. Khoury, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Office of Science, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags

Can an Aspirin a Day Prevent Colorectal Cancer in People with Lynch Syndrome?

a hand holding a pill with several other pills on the table and a pill bottle and a body with an exposed colon

Encouraging news for group at much greater risk of CRC Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common cause of hereditary colorectal (colon) cancer (CRC). People with LS have a 50-70% risk of developing CRC in their lifetimes – far higher than the 4% risk within the general population where CRC is a leading cause of

Posted on by Scott Bowen, Office of Public Health Genomics; Nicole Dowling, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags

When Should You Be Screened for Colorectal Cancer?

DNA and a person with their colon shown

Starting at the right time saves lives. People with a family history of CRC may need to start much earlier. Doctors and public health professionals strive to live by the creed “First, do no harm” but often wrestle with difficult choices, including when and how often screening tests should be conducted. Effective prevention of colorectal

Posted on by Scott Bowen, Office of Public Health Genomics; Lisa Richardson, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control; and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a comment

Universal Screening for Lynch Syndrome: Can Tumor Sequencing Have a Larger Public Health Impact on Treatment and Prevention of Colorectal Cancer?

Universal Screening with an arrow labeled Lynch Syndrome and DNA below it

Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common hereditary syndrome associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), accounting for about 3% of CRC patients. LS is a dominantly inherited condition with mutations in several mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Persons with LS are also at increased risk for endometrial and other cancers. Lynch syndrome affects 1

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, and Heather Hampel, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, OhioLeave a commentTags , ,

Integrating genomics into population-based cancer surveillance in the era of precision medicine

individuals all over a map of the US with DNA and a magnifiying glass on one person

Population-based cancer surveillance provides a quantitative measurement of cancer occurrence in the United States and globally. Core activities of surveillance include measuring cancer incidence and characterizing each cancer with regard to histopathology, stage, and treatment in the context of survival. Cancer surveillance has been crucial in informing policy and practice, as well as clinical and

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia and Lynne Penberthy, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer InstituteLeave a commentTags ,

The Cancer Moonshot, Hereditary Cancers and Population Genetic Screening

Cancer Moonshot with an image of a moon surrounded by DNA and a crowd of people

In September 2016, the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel delivered a report with 10 ambitious recommendations to shape cancer research for the next five years. One recommendation is to “expand use of proven prevention and early detection strategies.” [PDF 199 KB] There is a lot we can do to prevent cancer now— even with no

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Lisa C. Richardson, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a comment

Recommendations and Reality: What Personal Stories of Hereditary Cancer Can Tell Us

four photos of Sarah, Dave, Zac and Gloria (reading order starting top left)

In public health and clinical medicine, recommendations for interventions are generally based on the evidence supporting improved health outcomes. Studies that inform these recommendations often focus on the evidence for benefits, especially when those benefits include lives saved. The harms that affect quality of life are more challenging to quantify and sometimes go unmeasured. Recommendations

Posted on by Ridgely Fisk Green, Carter Consulting, Inc., and Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Katrina Trivers, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags ,

Human Disease and Bad Luck: Acting on Genetic & Environmental Factors to Reduce Cancer Risk

a pair of die, DNA and a hand holding a globe with a tree inside wiht sequencing in the background

In January 2015, a paper in Science created a “buzz” in the scientific community and the media. Based on statistical modelling, the authors suggested that “only a third of the variation in cancer risk among tissues is attributable to environmental factors or inherited predispositions. The majority is due to ‘bad luck,’ that is, random mutations

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics and Lisa C. Richardson, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 Comment

Data for Action in Public Health Genomics: Ensuring Equitable Implementation of Genomic Applications Across the Lifespan

data, a babies foot, a genetic counselor talking to a woman, an extended family

In the more than 20 years since the completion of the Human Genome Project, basic and clinical research have delivered on the promise to develop genomic applications that can help prevent and treat many diseases across the lifespan. However, efforts to ensure equitable implementation of genomic applications have fallen short particularly among racial and ethnic

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Katherine Kolor and Scott Bowen, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags