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Category: cancer

Trends and Factors Affecting Utilization of BRCA Testing in the United States: The Need for Improved Surveillance

hands holding a pink ribbon with the US map in the background

This blog post is a summary of two recent CDC papers on the trends in utilization of BRCA testing in the United States, and metropolitan-nonmetropolitan areas differences in testing. Women with pathogenic BRCA mutations have an estimated 45–65% risk of breast cancer and a 17–39% risk of ovarian cancer by age 70, as compared with Read More >

Posted on by Katherine Kolor, Zhuo Chen, and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

Integrating genomics into population-based cancer surveillance in the era of precision medicine

individuals all over a map of the US with DNA and a magnifiying glass on one person

Population-based cancer surveillance provides a quantitative measurement of cancer occurrence in the United States and globally. Core activities of surveillance include measuring cancer incidence and characterizing each cancer with regard to histopathology, stage, and treatment in the context of survival. Cancer surveillance has been crucial in informing policy and practice, as well as clinical and Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia and Lynne Penberthy, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer InstituteLeave a commentTags ,

Tracking Translation of Human Genome Discoveries into Prevention and Control of Common Chronic Diseases: The Action is in Cancer!

cancer cells with DNA and a few people in the foreground

Genomics seems to be everywhere these days. From the Human Genome Project to the Precision Medicine Initiative and from the Cancer Moonshot to breakthroughs in genome editing, we are overwhelmed with information about genomics. The hope and hype of discoveries are intermixed daily in published scientific articles and media coverage of how they might improve Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury MD, PhD, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, and Lisa Richardson, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a comment

The Cancer Moonshot, Hereditary Cancers and Population Genetic Screening

Cancer Moonshot with an image of a moon surrounded by DNA and a crowd of people

In September 2016, the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel delivered a report with 10 ambitious recommendations to shape cancer research for the next five years. One recommendation is to “expand use of proven prevention and early detection strategies.” [PDF 199 KB] There is a lot we can do to prevent cancer now— even with no Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Lisa C. Richardson, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a comment

Cancer Precision Medicine: More Population Sciences Ahead!

cancer precision medicne sign pointing ahead into a crowd of people

We explore briefly the expanding role of population sciences in the implementation of the NIH Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI). The initiative includes a major component on cancer precision treatment, and a large scale cohort study program to generate knowledge applicable to all areas of health and disease, including cancer risk factors and outcomes. Genomics is Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury MD, PhD, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia and Debbie Winn PhD, Deputy Director, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MarylandLeave a commentTags

Recommendations and Reality: What Personal Stories of Hereditary Cancer Can Tell Us

four photos of Sarah, Dave, Zac and Gloria (reading order starting top left)

In public health and clinical medicine, recommendations for interventions are generally based on the evidence supporting improved health outcomes. Studies that inform these recommendations often focus on the evidence for benefits, especially when those benefits include lives saved. The harms that affect quality of life are more challenging to quantify and sometimes go unmeasured. Recommendations Read More >

Posted on by Ridgely Fisk Green, Carter Consulting, Inc., and Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Katrina Trivers, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags ,

The Future of Epidemiology in the Age of Precision Medicine: Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, and Beyond

NCI-NHLBI Blog Graphic NCI adn NHLBI Common Themes for the Future of Epidemiology: Leadership, Resources, Cohorts, Methods, Workforce, Integration, Evaluation

We live in the era of “Big Data.” Evaluating the health impact of large scale biological, social, and environmental data is an emerging challenge. Epidemiology, the study of the distribution and determinants of human disease in populations, is a foundational science of public health and provides important insights for medical practice and disease prevention. Epidemiology has Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury M.D., Ph.D., Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Gina S. Wei, M.D., M.P.H., Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute1 Comment

Using Genomics in Precision Prevention of Breast Cancer

Hands joined in circle holding breast cancer struggle symbol and surrounded by DNA

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the United States. It is estimated that 3%-5% of breast cancer cases are hereditary, most often involving mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Such mutations confer high lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The United States Preventive Services Task Force has issued specific recommendations Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics and Lisa C Richardson, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

Human Disease and Bad Luck: Acting on Genetic & Environmental Factors to Reduce Cancer Risk

a pair of die, DNA and a hand holding a globe with a tree inside wiht sequencing in the background

In January 2015, a paper in Science created a “buzz” in the scientific community and the media. Based on statistical modelling, the authors suggested that “only a third of the variation in cancer risk among tissues is attributable to environmental factors or inherited predispositions. The majority is due to ‘bad luck,’ that is, random mutations Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics and Lisa C. Richardson, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 Comment

Making Universal Screening for Lynch Syndrome a Reality: The Lynch Syndrome Screening Network

flow chart individual

Every day, about 400 people in the United States are diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Approximately twelve of them have Lynch syndrome, a hereditary condition that increases the risk of colorectal cancer and other cancers.  Identifying people with Lynch syndrome could have substantial health benefits for them, their families, and communities.   Read More >

Posted on by Deb Duquette, MS, CGC & Sarah Mange, MPH- Michigan Department of Community Health; Cecelia Bellcross, PhD, MS- Emory University; Heather Hampel, MS, CGC- The Ohio State University; Kory Jasperson, MS, CGC- Huntsman Cancer Institute (Authors are all from the Lynch Syndrome Screening Network (LSSN) Founding Board of Directors)1 CommentTags , , , , ,
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