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Category: whole genome sequence

Genome Sequencing for Healthy Individuals? Think Big and Act Small!

a crowd of people with a magnifying glass on a few and DNA

In a 2013 blog post, we asked the question: “When should we all have our genomes sequenced?” At that time, we concluded that the time is not right and that “if we want to use whole genome sequencing in the course of regular preventive care and health promotion, research should be conducted to evaluate its Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Greg Feero, guest blogger, Maine Dartmouth Family Medicine ResidencyLeave a commentTags ,

The Ultimate Selfie

Now within reach, our personal genomic sequence offers an incredible reflection of who we are, and great promise to improve human health, but there are serious concerns about embracing it too quickly. Empowered Consumers in the Era of Me If social media is any indication, we, like Narcissus of ancient myth, are surely self-obsessed creatures. Read More >

Posted on by Scott Bowen and Muin J Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention2 CommentsTags , , , ,

Genome Sequencing in the Clinic – The question is not whether the glass is half-full or half-empty but whether or not the glass is the right tool.

two half full glasses of water - one with DNA inside it and one with DNA next to it

Earlier this fall, the Blue Cross Blue Shield Technology Evaluation Center produced a report evaluating the clinical use of exome sequencing in the diagnosis of rare diseases. That this report was even generated is remarkable, as it marks an appreciable level of penetration by exome sequencing into clinical care. A decade ago, sequencing and interpreting even Read More >

Posted on by W. Gregory Feero, MD, PhD, Maine Dartmouth Family Medicine ResidencyLeave a commentTags , , ,

When Should We All Have Our Genomes Sequenced?

a crowd of people with DNA in the foreground

Recently, George Church, a prominent genomics researcher and leader of the Personal Genome Project asked why so few people are opting to inspect their genome. The cost and accuracy of genome sequencing have certainly improved dramatically. He clearly sees the health benefits of whole genome sequencing. He states “we should avoid being judgmental of people Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention2 CommentsTags , , ,

Now Watch This: Genomic Epidemiology

Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Late last year, Science magazine published a list of six Areas to Watch in 2012. Number 6 on the list, NASA’s Curiosity rover, recently touched down on Mars. The Higgs boson (#1) has been found, faster-than-light neutrinos (#2) have been debunked, and further developments on stem-cell metabolism (#3) and treatments for intellectual disability (#5) are Read More >

Posted on by Marta Gwinn, Consultant, McKing Consulting Corp, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags ,

No Genome is an Island

Vibrio vulnificus bacteria

There was no cholera in Haiti until October 2010, when epidemic cholera swept the country. Within 6 months, more than 250,000 people were sickened and 4,000 died. A catastrophic earthquake earlier that year had exacerbated human and environmental risks by displacing millions of people and disrupting public health infrastructure. But there would have been no Read More >

Posted on by Marta Gwinn, Consultant, McKing Consulting Corp, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags , , , ,

Can We have Our Genome and Eat It Too? Deploying the Whole Genome Sequence In Medicine and Public Health, One Base Pair At A Time.

cake with double helix decoration - text: One base pair at a time

This post was originally published November 3, 2011 but is still very much applicable in 2013! The popular proverbial saying “you cannot have your cake and eat it too”  implies that one cannot consume something and preserve it at the same time–in other words, we cannot have it both ways.  Well, for once, maybe we Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention4 Comments
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