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Category: genomics

From One Hundred Thousand Genomes in the United Kingdom to Millions of Genomes in the United States: What Lessons Can we Learn?

A map of the US and UK with sequencing

In recent years, the United Kingdom (UK) has made a major commitment to developing a large scale population cohort study (100,000 genome project), linking high quality genomic sequence data to electronic health record information for the purposes of scientific discovery and clinical care improvement.  The plan is for this project to continue well into the Read More >

Posted on by W. Gregory Feero, Guest Blogger, Maine Dartmouth Family Medicine Residency, and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a comment

Happy Thanksgiving: Collect & Act on Your Family Health History

a multigenerational family eating a Thanksgiving meal with DNA

As you celebrate Thanksgiving with your family this November, remember that this special day is also National Family Health History Day. Family health history is important to your health and can help you detect unique disease risks and manage them before becoming sick, or find the right diagnosis and treatments when you have a certain Read More >

Posted on by Bob Wildin MD, Guest Blogger, Genomic Healthcare Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute and Muin J. Khoury MD, PhD, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

What Gets Measured Gets Done: Public Health Progress in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

a heart with a graph and people in the foreground

Just 4 years ago, one of us (MJK) co-chaired the Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) Foundation’s first FH Global Summit: Awareness to Action held in Annapolis, Maryland. The Summit brought together people from academia, government, the private sector, clinicians, as well as patients with the ambitious goals of raising awareness of FH, identifying key knowledge gaps, and Read More >

Posted on by Joshua Knowles MD, guest blogger, Stanford University School of Medicine and Muin J. Khoury MD, PhD, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia1 CommentTags

The Cancer Moonshot, Hereditary Cancers and Population Genetic Screening

Cancer Moonshot with an image of a moon surrounded by DNA and a crowd of people

In September 2016, the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel delivered a report with 10 ambitious recommendations to shape cancer research for the next five years. One recommendation is to “expand use of proven prevention and early detection strategies.” [PDF 199 KB] There is a lot we can do to prevent cancer now— even with no Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Lisa C. Richardson, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a comment

Five Misconceptions About the Role of Genomics in Public Health

5 Misconceptions arrow pointing to 5 and Facts arrow pointing to a hand holding a double helix with a crowd in the background

In a recent post, I reviewed the progress of genomics in public health over the past two decades and pondered on the lingering skepticism about genomics in the public health community. I propose that this skepticism is driven, at least in part, by 5 common misconceptions about the role of genomics in public health. In Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a comment

From Genes to Public Health 1996-2016: The Train Has Left the Station

train leaving the station with DNA

In 1996, a working group from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published an article in the American Journal of Public Health entitled: “From Genes to Public Health: Applications of Genetic Technology in Disease Prevention.” The agency-wide group assessed the implications of the Human Genome Project and related technologies for public health and disease Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

Precision Public Health: Reconciling Biological and Social Determinants of Health

a mother and child surrounded by DNA and several images of environmental factors

On June 6-7, 2016, I had the honor of participating in the “Precision Public Health” summit hosted by the Gates Foundation and the White House Office of Science and Technology at the University of California in San Francisco. The summit focused on developing a global “precision” agenda to improve health and prevent death and disease Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

The Shift From Personalized Medicine to Precision Medicine and Precision Public Health: Words Matter!

crowd with on figure standing out and DNA on the top

Advances in genomics and other ‘omic’ technologies have ushered in a new era variably called “personalized” or “precision” medicine, which takes into account individual genetic and other sources of variability in disease treatment and prevention. In the past decade, we have seen a significant growth in interest and usage of the terms personalized and precision Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a comment

Does genetic risk information improve healthy behavior? Let’s not throw out the baby with the bath water!

a double helix in a green circle, a glass of alcohol in a red circle wth a slash through it, a No Smoking stop sign, excercise equipement, an apple and a Screening door tag

In a recent systematic review with meta-analysis, Hollands et al evaluated the impact of communicating genetic risk information on risk-reducing health behaviors and motivations for behavior change. The authors reviewed 18 studies with 7 behavioral outcomes, including smoking cessation, diet and physical activity. They found no significant effects of communicating DNA based risk estimates on Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags ,

Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing and Public Health Education

a woman looking at her spit in a test tube, sequencing wrapped around a hand, a person looking at double helix on a monitor, a person discussion her genetic test results with a counslor and a crowd of people

We have previously blogged about the value (or lack thereof) of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests in improving health. In a 2011 blog entitled “think before you spit” we cautioned that there was very little evidence that the use of such tests improves health and prevents disease for healthy people in the population. The blog was Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , , ,
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