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Help! What do you want from a mobile Pocket Guide?

Posted on by Donna Van Bogaert Ph.D. and Glenn Doyle

Since its first printing in 1978, the NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards (NPG) continues to be the Institute’s most popular document. The NPG provides general descriptive, exposure, and protective and emergency recommendations for 677 chemicals commonly found in the work environment. Workers, employers, and occupational health professionals all use the NPG in the course of their work and often in emergency situations.  Fire fighters, for example, use the NPG to prepare themselves for exposures  they might encounter on fire scenes.

The current printed pocket guide is a 424 page, 3 inch by 7 inch, pocket-sized book.  We know many people rely on the printed version, particularly in times of emergency when power may be out or signals down or overextended. The NPG will continue to be available for print. We  also know that there is a growing demand for the NPG in a mobile version that could offer users more convenience and flexibility.   

Right now, NIOSH is developing a free mobile web version of the Pocket Guide. We’d like to hear from those of you who use the NPG.  We’d like to know about how you use the guide, what industry you work in, and what part mobile devices play in your work life. This will help us determine how to organize content and what functions will make the mobile NPG the best possible guide for people like you.   Based on our research, we’ve made some assumptions about how you might use a mobile application.

Please help us with the development of this tool by providing your comments — agreeing, disagreeing, or introducing new important ideas related to the assumptions made in the statements below.

  1. A free mobile web version of the NIOSH Pocket Guide (NPG) would be a valuable tool for safety officers, industrial hygienists, emergency responders, and health professionals who treat workers.
  2. Most professionals using the mobile NPG will be using iphone, ipad, and Android technologies.
  3. Hands free technology would be an important feature of a mobile NPG.
  4. A small mobile device will not be able to show all the NPG fields at one time. The fields most important to show first are: Name, CAS# , Incompatibilities and Reactivities,   Exposure Symptoms, First Aid.
  5. Not everyone will have the resources to access the NPG mobile version. Other ways NIOSH could make the NPG easier to use might include posting a downloadable EXCEL database. Users could decide which pages and fields to print and eliminate information that wasn’t useful in their specific situation.

We want to ensure that the mobile NPG offers as much functionality as possible.  Please provide your input in the comment section below to help us make this new tool useful for you and others in your field.

Donna Van Bogaert Ph.D.  and Glenn Doyle

Dr. Van Bogaert is the Chief of the Information, Resources, and Dissemination Branch at NIOSH

Mr. Doyle is the NIOSH Web Coordinator

Posted on by Donna Van Bogaert Ph.D. and Glenn Doyle

154 comments on “Help! What do you want from a mobile Pocket Guide?”

Comments listed below are posted by individuals not associated with CDC, unless otherwise stated. These comments do not represent the official views of CDC, and CDC does not guarantee that any information posted by individuals on this site is correct, and disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on any such information. Read more about our comment policy ».

    I would be most likely to use this tool as an app on my iPhone. It would be very helpful to have this information with me as I move from lab to lab and work in the Hazardous Waste areas far removed from my desk. It would be nice to have a print or share function. I would be able to email safety information from my location to the site coordinator in an emergency to help facilitate site wide communications.

    Point 1 – I agree. I have already purchased a mobile version of the NPG on my iPhone from ThatsMyStapler, Inc. I should have paid more attention when I purchased it as I assumed it was made availabe from NIOSH.

    Point 2 – I agree.

    Point 3 – I definitely agree. It would be nice if it was integrated with voice recongition utilities such as Siri on the iPhone.

    Point 4 – Agree to some extent. As a practicing Industrial Hygienist, I would also like quick access to PPE information such as respiratory protection recommendations, exposure limites and IDLH values, etc.

    Point 5 – Agreed.

    I would add this to my disaster apps. which include DOT- ERG 2012, NLM- WebWiser, NML- Mobile REMM among others (all for i-phone). I am a laboratory professional who is also involved in disaster preparedness . I have used your “pocket” guide since the first edition. Now, it will truly be a pocket guide. SCA

    The current NIOSH Pocket Guide is an invaluable tool in our training programs teaching construction workers in the 40-hr Hazardous Waste Worker course, the 16-hr Confined Space Entry course, and others. For most of our adult students, it’s the first time they’ve experienced success in chemistry, including in High School! The various properties of chemicals that construction workers are exposed to is a priority for us, for use in Android and Apple products. For us, hands-free applications would be interesting, but not the most important. Compatibility with WISER and with DOT are important for us. Making the tool useable by construction workers on the job is key; identifying chemicals, emergency response, personal protection, symptoms, all of these are important. Kudos on your plan to develop an app.

    I agree with all of the statements. As was said previously, adding this tool to those I already maintain in an “app” format would be very helpful. This should be much more user friendly than the pdf version.

    I use the NPG in our training constantly with our apprentices and journeymen. It is amazing how many of them find the information very helpful on the job site. Since many of the members now use the latest technologies, putting an app together is a great idea. I feel that the PEL and REL should be included as well as the IDLH of the chemicals and obviously any PPE requirements if not already part of the app. These are the things that our membership need to know right now before working in a hazardous situation.

    I also agree with all the above. This application must be compatible with wiser and the DOT.This will save a lot of time. By including the reactivity data and response procedures, will go a long way.
    I just downloaded another app from NOAA called the CRW that is like wiser but have not used yet.I also have the other apps as well.
    The Pel Rel and the IDLHs are key and the PPE of course,but then having to get my reactivity data and if necessary the neutralizing chemical. or response data takes even more time.
    I want to be able streamline that process in order to use the right response option, or to rule it out quickly because of other chemicals that may be present, or because of the ones that have been produced and their reactivity data which is site specific.

    This is especially true, when sometimes the process’s involved in just some industrial applications we are at, may include chemicals and materials to make over 500+ products. Hands free is also ok and voice activation if needed.

    Like Don Ellenberger, our training program uses the NPG as a primary reference for the HAZWOPER and Confined Space training. I definitely agree with points 1 & 2. Point 3 is not as important to me. I agree in principle with point 4 except that I see the chemical and physical properties section as a very important feature. I agree with point 5.

    The blog does not explicitly refer to the other databases that are included on the NPG CD-ROM. I’d like to see the addition of at least the Recommendations for Chemical Protective Clothing database, particularly if it could be updated.

    All evaluation comments are valid.Formating of information very important, which enhances usefulness during emergencies and normal assessments. Electronic down load must have copying ease to assist user transferring of information. Thank you allowing feedback comments for user friendly resource.

    I pretty much agree with every point and would definitely use a mobile version on both the iphone and ipad. Kind of amazed that NIOSH has not already done this.

    An excellent idea. I would definitely add this app to my i-phone.
    I agree with all 5 assumptions except I would need REL, PEL, IDLH, and PPE info over exposure symptoms and first aid.
    Hopefully, the app could be set up so that you could easily scroll through the fields so this would not be a significant issue.

    One of the items that has been missing in the NIOSH Pocket Guide (NPG) is where is the chemical most likely used or found in the various industries and possible links to further information. The NPG is one of the most valuable resources available to augment SDS sheets and aid both employees and management in communicating the hazards associated with chemicals. Since many new chemicals come into the workplace every year it would be nice to list them with as much information that is available at the time. A printing app may also be helpful for Trainers and concerned employers to help provide training as well as a jobsite resource since many employers are “banning” the use of cell phones on jobsites. I would like to you for the opportunity to comment and to thank all of the other commenters for valuable contributions!

    We are excited about all of the comments that have come in so far. Please continue to contribute as good insights and ideas come to you. The NIOSH Mobile Pocket Guide project is a three-year project funded by a National Occupational Research Agenda grant. This fall we plan to have our first draft prototype and will keep you all posted on this blog on progress with the project.

    Point 4: You may want to consider producing a Mobile version and an IPad version with more field available.

    Please update all exposure limits with current information.

    Consider making Health Hazards information consistent with new GHS classifications.
    Consider providing links to SDSs for some substances.

    This may be obvious but I can’t tell you how many developers overlook this very important feature:

    Make sure the app is compatible not just with iOS but also with the Android OS.

    Also, since phone sizes can be small, rather than try to cram all the information on a single screen maybe breaking it down into sections so that it can be opened using an accordion style tab set up.

    Just some ideas I hope the developers can keep in mind.

    jerman

    1. Absolutely! A mobile version offers access to an incredibly valuable resource without having to remember to bring the book.
    2. Most likely.
    3. Hands free technology would be a nice to have but certainly would not be a must.
    4. Primary information displayed should be based on the name(s), CAS # and other identification methods. From there the user should be able to link to other relevant information such as PPE, IDLH etc easily.
    5. A downloadable excel database would also be an excellent support mechanism. Especially to be able to print “added value” information to keep paper documentation to a minimum.

    The mobile Pocket Guide is an excellent idea. I agree with the comments already given. It would be an excellent addition to the hard copy.

    Make the web version able to convert units, such as: ATM or mmHg to PSIa or PSIg, mg/m^3 to percent or ppm. This resource is not as useful in the field when the units given have to be converted to something responders actually use, and having to convert units adds an opportunity for miscalculation.

    1. I am in huge agreenment that a mobile version offers access to an incredibly valuable resource without having to remember to bring the book.
    2. Generally, yes. However, I am a Blackberry user (work issued) and have been recently moved to Blackberry 10. I would like to see a native app for Blackberry; however Android apps can be ported over to Blackberry. Not as good as native, but workable. An app for Iphone, Android, and Blackberry would be excellent. I don’t feel that people should be limited by their technology, so possibly a mobile site would be beneficial to cover the ground of all phones and tablets.
    3. I don’t feel that hands free technology is a must.
    4. Primary information displayed should a quick reference summary, with links to the various sections.
    5. Rather than an excel database, a mobile site would better accomodate this.

    I like the option of sharing the information – email, twitter, SMS….

    1. Agreed, it is also an important educational tool. As such, on the help menus, it would be helpful to include glossaries and links to other resources. If you are looking for app ideas, cross-references to chemical name synonims, DOT plackards, GHS plackards, units of measure conversions and CAS number lookup would be useful.

    2.Most professionals using the mobile NPG will be using iphone, ipad, and Android technologies – Agreed, mostly Android in my workplace. Please design the app to provide a “low graphics” or small interface option to display the data.

    3.Hands free technology would be an important feature of a mobile NPG – this would be a nice feature, but I would emphasize the other aspects of the interface before this piece. Voice recognition for the various ways in which people pronounce chemical names would be challenging.

    4.A small mobile device will not be able to show all the NPG fields at one time. The fields most important to show first are: Name, CAS# , Incompatibilities and Reactivities, Exposure Symptoms, First Aid. Agreed, GHS plackards could be made small and shown along the sides or top of the screens.

    5.Not everyone will have the resources to access the NPG mobile version. Other ways NIOSH could make the NPG easier to use might include posting a downloadable EXCEL database. Users could decide which pages and fields to print and eliminate information that wasn’t useful in their specific situation. Agreed

    Excellent Idea!

    I would like to see this be used on iPads or the iPod Touch to be used OFFLINE as we would not have internet access out in the field. We would use this in case of emergencies and leave it in our Safety Van. We would like Fire Hazard information such as flashpoint, proper extinguishing media and measures, etc. and Industrial Hygiene information such as OSHA, NIOSH, ACGIH OELs and proper respirator to use.

    1. Yes a free mobile app would be used by not only IHs but Emergency Responders, Lab workers, people dealing with waste, and so on.

    2. Yes most would be on Apple products as well as Android based phones as tablets.

    3. Hands free, such as voice searh, would be nice but not a deal breaker if it was not included.

    4. With the abality to pinch and zoom on my mobile device the forth point does not seem like an issue, however, common information at the top would be helpful.

    5. I agree with the 5th point as well.

    As an avid user of electronic devices to assist me in the performance of my job, the ability to access relevant information at the push of a button (outside of the office) is invaluable. As a Health Safety and Environmental manager, immediate access is quite a benefit in resolving challenges in the field and as a tablet (Android) user I can perform any task on site instead of having to return to the office to complete the report with refernece material.
    CAS is primary and should be seachable as well as multiple names for specific chemicals.

    Thanks

    It would be great to have quick access to the guide on my Android devices. right now, I have the guide bookmarked in my web browser of my Nexus so that I have access to it on the shop floor and in the field. The issue I have now is that, accessing it via the bookmarks, I spend a lot of time resizing and moving the page around to get the info I want.

    Offline would be nicer, for sure, as I don’t always have internet access.

    1. Agree. This would be very helpful when on-route to an emergency. I have the NIH WISER program on my mobile device now and would love to add the NPG too.

    2. Agree. We would be using iPhones and iPads.

    3. I don’t know if I would use a hands-free ability.

    4. Disagree, the most important fields are Name, Synonyms, incompatibilities, Respirator recommendations. As a first responder, I would want to know what respirator to wear. The Chemical & Physical properties are important as well. Flash point will indicate flammability, IP will tell me if I can use a PID to detect, VP will indicate volatility. All these are important when responding to spills.

    5. I don’t know if I would use the excel database, but others may find this useful.

    Please include Windows 8 in your development as some of us have the Windows phone. Looking forward to such a useful app.

    One of the issues with the current book, when used “in the field” is the need to convert units. I don’t use mmHg or ATMs, I use PSIa or PSIg. It would be very nice to have the option to change to a different unit, so that there would be no need of converting. Any time you calculate a conversion, you introduce the possibility of a math error, and you spend time. having a drop down box for units saves a respoonder from making the calculation or spending the time.

    Other examples include Degrees Fahrenheit to Celcius, ppm to % to mg/ M^3, gram-moles to pound-moles, etc.

    You could also (as has been suggested) have a link to an MSD for the chemical.
    Hotlink the terms used to the definitions and/or publications found in Tables 1-5.

    I use the present pocket guide to help my customers decide what respiratory protection is required in any given situation where hazards to the worker are present.
    It is a tremendously useful tool as is, but what I would really like is for the numbers of hazards to be increased. I would not likely use it from a mobile device, since all of the infromaiton that is presently show is useful in making protection decisions. Both the web access version and the downloadable pdf version are versions I would continue to use and to urge my customers to use.

    1. Agree
    2. Agree
    3. disagree. I don’t use hands free for most applications. The current pocket guide is not hands free.
    4. Agree, but I would only list the chemical name and CAS number. I would put all the other fields as buttons that could be selected to get specific information. For example a Physical properties button, respiratory protection button, incompatibilities/reactivities button. Ones that didn’t apply could be ghosted.
    5. This would be terrrific. As an IH, I often try to scrub data to find information. For example, I needed to know the flash point of common solvents for a ventilation calculation. It would have been beneficial to find all listed solvents with a flash point under 100 F by sorting the guide.

    Nice blog. Thanks for sharing this blog with us. We at Webgeometrics a Mobile Application Development Company provides mobile web development services.

    1) AGREE. As an IH I use the NIOSH pocket guide as a quick reference almost daily and recommend it to anyone I work with. In many situations carrying around the book just isnt possible but I am never without my Android smartphone. If I had the pocket guide on my Android I would feel much more prepaired for anything that could come up.

    2) Agree.

    3) Agree but could be an upgrade/update after initial launch. The mobile web NPG would be very usful even without this functionality.

    4) IDLH would also be important.

    5) Agree

    I am working in water and wastewater treatment. My work has many risks with hazardous chemicals. This is very useful for me

    Thanks for sharing

    A mobile app for the Android platform would be useful not only for travel situations, but for facility working areas that do not have computer access.

    I think there’s a lot of value to it being available both in hard copy and as an app. I have the ThatsMyStapler version on my Ipad and Ipod for emergency response, but when I teach college level Haz Mat classes, many of my students opt to leave the hard copy on their desks and instead reach for their hand held devices during exercises.

    1 – Agree. A free mobile web version of the NIOSH Pocket Guide (NPG) would be an extremely valuable tool, and would likely be used extensively in various fields.
    2- Agree – Almost every oneo f the professionals in this field tend to use either iPhone, iPad, and Android technologies. I use a Blackberry, but this technology has been phasing out over time.
    3 – Unsure. I’m not quite sure how hands-free technology would be implemented.
    4 – Agree. Having these fields (Name, CAS# , Incompatibilities and Reactivities, Exposure Symptoms, First Aid) are the main hits. Another field to include would be TLV / PELs.
    5 – Agree. A downloadable EXCEL database would be quite useful, including being able to decide which pages and fields to print and eliminate information that isn’t useful in the specific situation.

    Mobile or hardcopy, NIOSH should make sure to include all MSHA-regulated chemicals/dusts and corresponding MSHA PELs in the next edition of the NIOSH Pocket Guide. That would do much to extend the utility of the Pocket Guide for those with safety/health responsibilities in the mining industry–a major industry fraght with occupational hazards. This is long overdue. Just do it, NIOSH!

    I would appreciate if the app will come with the option to share and email the details.

    Though it would be helpful and handy to have this app on my phone.

    1. – Agree, I have been looking for this for a few years. Right now my primary mobile source of similar information is WIZER app.

    2. – I agree with this also, currently using iPhone.

    3. – Hands free would be helpful, but I wouldn’t consider this critical to the app development.

    4. – For me, the suggested fields are important. I also use the chemical and physical properties frequently for both training for hazmat and in emergency response. It would be good to have the primary sections that are currently in the PG as initial “tabs” or in a “list” so you could quickly access the section you are looking for. The web version is my preferred source of data during an incident in where I have access to a computer and internet, or the printed guide.

    5. – This is a good idea. I like how the web version has all the abbreviations spelled out so you don’t have to look them up. This may be a good work around for those that do not have mobile app, but have laptop and can store the database on their desktop.

    I would recommend that the NPG be updated before the time and effort goes into making the app. The respirator selection part does not incorporate teh current NIOSH policy wrt to carcinogenswith an OEL. It also uses APFs from the 2004 NIOSH Selection Guide which are different than OSHA and in some cases higher than the OSHA APFs potentially jepordizing workers. In addition the tables for respriator selection taken from the OSHA standards and included in the NPG are out dated.

    I have searched other sources previously, but I would use this as my first choice when available. The greatest challenge I experience is being an investigator of obscure synonyms on mSDSs, so any cross-referencing powers that can be incorporated would be great.

    I created the NPG several years ago for iPhone/iPad under my corp : ThatsMyStapler.

    It filled a niche as there wasn’t an easy way to utilize the PDF form of the NPG on iPhone. The web version wasn’t usable either by my first clients (my wife and coworkers) as the lab was in the basement where wifi wasn’t (and still isn’t) available.

    I welcome a mobile version of the NPG for Android/iPhone/Blackberry from NIOSH – as the owners of the data, it should be up to the organization to keep the data up-to-date and thorough across several devices.

    That said, I hope there will an excel version of the data released as this will allow, as others have mentioned, further analysis/filtering/sorting of the data and the ability for other developers like me to create a value-added product where one isn’t yet available.

    Mobile APP for Iphone. I am an emergency responder, and EHS Manager. I would benefit greatly form the mobile product for emergency response, disaster response, and site health and safety audits. The chemical and physical properties section is very important to me, along with TLV/PEL/REL, and IDLH. Hands free is not high on my priority list.

    A vast number of technicians within my department would welcome a free NPG app, on either an I-phone or android app. Many already have Wiser and the NPG would provide another reference within easy reach on response. Would like to see the guide search function use spelling, CAS, DOT UN # as an entry point into the data, then sub-catagories presented such as “health effects”, “chemical/physical properties”, “regulatory levels”, etc. broken out for quick research into pertinent fields. Would also like to have the ability to view the chemical page as it would be in NPG and if not asking for too much, save as a PDF for easy printing. Not too excited about the excel spreadsheet, since the updating of information may prove to be an issue.

    1. Strongly agree
    2. agree
    3. Disagree – hands-free would not be a priority for me
    4. Somewhat Agree – First aid not a priority for me, obviously important but don’t know how many people use NPG for first aid advice – I would add exposure limits (RELs, PELs, IDLH), maybe some selct physical parameters like BP, FP, IP, VP, SG – I want to know where the chemical is going to be in the environment.
    5. Disagree – not a priority for me – having a mobile ap, plus the hard copy, plus the existing web version, I don’t see a need for an excel spreadsheet or other version

    I am a hazmat responder and health & safety officer

    The only thing I could think is for it to be a fully searchable document by at LEAST Name, Synonym, CAS#.

    Also, As a Bioenvironmental Engineer the most information usually required are the primary exposure routes, is it a Carcinogen, Mutagen, or Teratogen. And if it is a Skin or Sensitiser (ie: ACGIH TLV Booklet).

    All the previous info should still be included.

    I think it is a natural progression of this resource. It would be a benefit to my emergency response work and a good thing to show in my training.

    Let’s make it happen!

    I have used the current incarnation of the NIOSH pocket guide app several times. I have and Android phone and tablet and it works well on both. I assumed that it was from NIOSH but it must not be. If you go to the Google play store it can be found. This is great news for those of us in Haz-Mat and are with a munici[al FD.

    Those of us that are very familiar with the NIOSH book have little difficulty mining useful information from it as is. However I have been wondering for a couple of years now why there are no voice activated command applications for the NIOSH guide.

    For the novice user of the book it would probably be very helpful for them to just ask what the chemical and physical properties for a particular product are or it’s IDLH to determine the viability of a victim.

    While it may be difficult for a phone application to understand a voice activated chemical name inquiry ( we all have difficulty wiith some pronunciations of chemicals at times) the user could type in the chemical name and then hit a voice activation tab and ask specifically for things like boiling point, vapor pressure, vapor density, IDLH, LEL & UEL etc.

    This is great. As an OHSA, HAZMAT and Confined Space Instructor this will be perfect as an onsite/on demand access tool for references to chemical safety. I currently have to tag along volumes of NPG, DOT 2012 ERG; TLV & BEi’s and physically look up information for associates and clients. Will appreciate availability of the App for Android devices. Anxiously waiting!!!!

    I would definitely use this with my iPhone. I think tech NIOSH Pocket Guide (NPG) would be good. I also work in different labs in our college and there is a lot of construction going on around. Helpful indeed.

    John

    I use Android Phone.NIOSH Pocket Guide (NPG) is a great technology, but I am a teacher if the technology is necessary for me. hopefully this technology has many benefits especially for the workers, employers, and professionals to avoid the Chemical Hazards (NPG). I agree

    I am the Public Sector Consultant for Utah OSHA Consultation and I use the pocket guide mostly as a teaching tool. I encourage all employers to have a copy on hand for quick, easy reference. Most of these employers are not emergency responders, though some are. I have heard from a number of both non-EMS and EMS employers that they would like the pocket guide available on their smart phone so that they could use it away from the office. In this day and age of the smart phone in everyone’s hand, this would be a great resource. All of the things you can do to make it user friendly would be good additions. I would love a version that I could have on my laptop, to help with teaching.

    A spanish version, please!!! This book is widely used in Latin America, is a great source of information for HazMat management and emergency respose. ¡Gracias!

    I have worked in Emergency/ Rescue services and also in Safety in Industrial settings I cannot put into words how valuable a app for the pocket guide would be. The information provided is one of the most proactive safety preplanning prevention tools around and when things go wrong the guide is the most important tool to mitigating an event in the safest manor possible. Please do it now implement the guide

    Please make it an iPhone app. Preferably able to use without wifi connection if required wiser is a good example. Also provide a full site access on computer. Include confined spaces , gas testing with gas chris sensitivities etc. I use the guide for preventive measures and mitigation Please add medical & testing Include a comment blog site and incorporate social media following.

    MSDS Data sheet link (smartphone) app to Facilitate quick identification, with cross references to chemical compounds used in said product.

    I think an app would be great, but a paperback version would be handy too.

    in an emergency you would want the best of both.

    Not everyone will have the resources to access the NPG mobile version. Other ways NIOSH could make the NPG easier to use might include posting a downloadable EXCEL database. Users could decide which pages and fields to print and eliminate information that wasn’t useful in their specific situation. Agreed

    This book is widely used in Latin America, is a great source of information for HazMat management and emergency respose good job

    As a Bioenvironmental Engineer the most information usually required are the primary exposure routes, is it a Carcinogen, Mutagen, or Teratogen. And if it is a Skin or Sensitiser (ie: ACGIH TLV Booklet).

    First i would like to give thank for writing on such an important and interesting topic. I consider that is really a great app and helpful for all working employee too. Is this app available for android 4.2.2 version anymore?

    Thanks
    Jose

    1. Agree
    2. Agree
    3. disagree. I don’t use hands free for most applications. The current pocket guide is not hands free.
    4. Agree, but I would only list the chemical name and CAS number. I would put all the other fields as buttons that could be selected to get specific information. For example a Physical properties button, respiratory protection button, incompatibilities/reactivities button. Ones that didn’t apply could be ghosted.
    5. This would be terrrific.

    I would be most likely to use this tool as an app on my iPhone. It would be very helpful to have this information with me as I move from lab to lab and work in the Hazardous Waste areas far removed from my desk. It would be nice to have a print or share function. I agree

    I would use the NPG if it was as simple as the Transport Canada “ERG 2012” mobile app, with just inputting the CAS# or name and then taking you to the proper page.

    The mobile Pocket Guide is an excellent idea. I agree with the comments already given. It would be an excellent addition to the hard copy.

    It is a good pocket guide to easily understand about mobile and mobile technology. We are working for same mobile theme.

    I agree with you that NIOSH Pocket Guide (NPG) would be a valuable tool for the peoples of all professions. Also I like your blog. I always share your blog with my facebook friends.

    As a Bioenvironmental Engineer the most information usually required are the primary exposure routes, is it a Carcinogen, Mutagen, or Teratogen. And if it is a Skin or Sensitiser (ie: ACGIH TLV Booklet).

    I am Iphone user and I am very satisfied from using it! They shall developed NIOSH and focusing it on the Apple platforms!

    The mobile Pocket Guide is an excellent idea. I agree with the comments already given. It would be an excellent addition to the hard copy.

    I think it is great you guys are making a mobile app for us! I agreed with every point that you posted so great job. Thank you so much for the information you provide us with.

    I definitely agree. It would be nice if it was integrated with voice recongition utilities such as Siri on the iPhone.

    Yes it is, As a Bioenvironmental Engineer the most information usually required are the primary exposure routes, is it a Carcinogen, Mutagen, or Teratogen.

    The idea is excellent. I consider that is really a great app and helpful for all working employee too.It would be an excellent addition to the hard copy.Thanks a lot.

    Things like NPG mobile guide should be created more often. Thanks for reminding all of us about how beneficial this product can be via this blog.

    woow,, IT VERY COOL IDEA ..
    I am working alongside chemical factory every day, then the mobile version of this app will be very useful.

    First of all I would like to say thanks for sharing such nice Article. I will be glad to read a such nice post. It’s really so Informational and I learn much from them. Keep posting.

    With Regards,

    The mobile Pocket Guide is an excellent idea. I agree with the comments already given. It would be an excellent addition to the hard copy.

    Yes, you are right that mobile Pocket Guide is an excellent idea. Health care Freeware site that has a load of online databases of healthcare information and downloadable software. Investing in Medical Information Software today is the best way to run your practice well with the aid of modern medical technology. You can also try free (M)SDS and GHS iOS application and Android Mobile Apps from online sources.

    1. Agree
    2. Agree
    3. disagree. I don’t use hands free for most applications. The current pocket guide is not hands free.
    4. Agree, but I would only list the chemical name and CAS number. I would put all the other fields as buttons that could be selected to get specific information. For example a Physical properties button, respiratory protection button, incompatibilities/reactivities button. Ones that didn’t apply could be ghosted.
    5. This would be terrrific.

    Need to find out long term effects, and how long chemicals stay in body with health effects of 32 chemicals in drinking water at Tyndall AFB/Panama City, Florida all above safe EPA’s drinking water standards- EPA ID: FL1570024124.

    I agree with the 5 assumptions above. I would include as the major abilities a good search tool, and a print function. My hazmat team would use this in a iOS environment and I would personally use an Android version. Thanks for considering this!

    I would definitely find the mobile app useful for several occurrences. The most important one would be in an emergency situation. I would be able to interact with the safety department and advise them of potential chemicals within the facility.

    Mobile guide for phones is very good but an additional guide for tablets would make a bigger screen and more user friendly. A search engine to connect the synonyms to the main guide would also help.

    I don’t use hands free for most applications.I would use this in a iOS environment and I would personally use an Android version. Great Work! Thanks for sharing.

    Yes, you are right that mobile Pocket Guide is an excellent idea. Health care Freeware site that has a load of online databases of healthcare information and downloadable software. Investing in Medical Information Software today is the best way to run your practice well with the aid of modern medical technology. You can also try free (M)SDS and GHS iOS application and Android Mobile Apps from online sources.

    thanks for this Admin, Mobile guide for phones is very good but an additional guide for tablets would make a bigger screen and more user friendly. A search engine to connect the synonyms to the main guide would also help.

    I agree with the 5 assumptions above. I would include as the major abilities a good search tool, and a print function. My hazmat team would use this in a iOS environment and I would personally use an Android version. Thanks for considering this!

    I might also be probably to utilize this kind of tool as a possible iphone app in my own new iphone 5. It could be very useful to obtain these records with me when i move via lab to lab and perform inside Harmful Squander areas considerably taken from my own desk.My partner and i could electronic mail safety details via my own location on the web site adviser in an crisis to assist help web site broad devices.

    I would be most likely to use this tool as an app on my iPhone. It would be very helpful to have this information with me as I move from lab to lab and work in the Hazardous Waste areas far removed from my desk.

    I don’t use hands free for most applications.I would use this in a iOS environment and I would personally use an Android version. Great Work! Thanks for sharing.

    Regarding an iPhone app I’d like to see one that has Force Touch support. That is you could drill down into an entry that’s being displayed for more detailed information.

    Have the camera do look ups for the end user. Point the phone at a spilled bottle of some chemical (able to see name, CAS etc.) and it’s hazards are displayed.

    Make the app easy to use for folks while PPE is being worn.

    All the comments seem well thought out and I concur. Please consider an android version as well for those of us who are not apple groupies.

    Great Idea
    I would like to see this be used on iPads or the iPod Touch to be used OFFLINE as we would not have internet access out in the field. We would use this in case of emergencies and leave it in our Safety Van. We at [name removed] would like Fire Hazard information such as flashpoint, proper extinguishing media and measures, etc. and Industrial Hygiene information such as OSHA, NIOSH, ACGIH OELs and proper respirator to use.

    I agree with all 5 assumptions except I would need REL, PEL, IDLH, and PPE info over exposure symptoms and first aid.
    Hopefully, the app could be set up so that you could easily scroll through the fields so this would not be a significant issue.

    good idea
    1. yes i agree
    2. agree ((need fo iOS and android)
    3. not required
    4. agree (Name, CAS# , Incompatibilities and Reactivities, Exposure Symptoms, First Aid.)

    5. now everyone can access mobile version (make it as offline )

    p.s. need user friendly and search friendly app.

    The idea is excellent. I consider that is really a great app and helpful for all working employee too.It would be an excellent addition to the hard copy.Thanks a lot.

    Interesting, I didn’t even realize how old this article was.
    I’ll still help:
    1.agree
    2.agree
    3.not required
    4.agree
    5.agree
    Hopefully that helps! If you need any more help, let us know

    I agree with you that NIOSH Pocket Guide (NPG) would be a valuable tool for the peoples of all professions. Also I like your blog. I always share your blog with my facebook friends.

    The idea is excellent. I consider that is really a great app and helpful for all working employee too.It would be an excellent addition to the hard copy.Thanks a lot.

    Someone is keeping track of my analytic measures; that’s wonderful. Some blogs use that as a measure of making a difference; I don’t. I look at what people say. I read every comment even if I don’t respond. A lot of folks say that the information has been interesting; that the blog is well written; that I should continue. No one says how they use the material, or, for that matter, if they do.

    I agree, because with a free mobile web version of the NIOSH Pocket Guide (NPG) will be very helpful, because we do not have to carry the book :)

    I think Mobile Pocket Guide is very good and useful thing for everyone. You should keep it up for permanently…Thanks

    Hello,
    its a very good planning to discover a pocket mobile guide for us. You may include medical guideline in your pocket guideline. It will obviously help us. thanks for your planning. you may visit my site below.

    I am a volunteer firefighter. I have a windows phone. Be nice if everything ran on windows in addition to apply and android devices

    I would stay with a printed version, but should it be more convenient to handle. And put it in every new car which is bought by a company needed this information. Anyway, free app is good, but you need to have a smartphone, space in it for an app, which you wont use everyday and it must be always charged if needed to read. Printed version is always there.

    Thanks for sharing such a informative article , i liked it very much , as i am working in chemical industry so its very useful for me .. thanks a lot once again

    In addition to an MS Excel app you may want to develop MS Access database.

    An app for Blackberry or Windows phone will help the small minority of users that own those types of phones.

    An app in Spanish may help a growing community of Industrial Hygienists in this country.

    I would stay with a printed version, but should it be more convenient to handle. And put it in every new car which is bought by a company needed this information. Anyway, free app is good, but you need to have a smartphone, space in it for an app, which you wont use everyday and it must be always charged if needed to read. Printed version is always there.

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