Category: cancer

The Future of Epidemiology in the Age of Precision Medicine: Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, and Beyond

NCI-NHLBI Blog Graphic NCI adn NHLBI Common Themes for the Future of Epidemiology: Leadership, Resources, Cohorts, Methods, Workforce, Integration, Evaluation

We live in the era of “Big Data.” Evaluating the health impact of large scale biological, social, and environmental data is an emerging challenge. Epidemiology, the study of the distribution and determinants of human disease in populations, is a foundational science of public health and provides important insights for medical practice and disease prevention. Epidemiology has Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury M.D., Ph.D., Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Gina S. Wei, M.D., M.P.H., Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute1 Comment

Using Genomics in Precision Prevention of Breast Cancer

Hands joined in circle holding breast cancer struggle symbol and surrounded by DNA

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the United States. It is estimated that 3%-5% of breast cancer cases are hereditary, most often involving mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Such mutations confer high lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The United States Preventive Services Task Force has issued specific recommendations Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics and Lisa C Richardson, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

Human Disease and Bad Luck: Acting on Genetic & Environmental Factors to Reduce Cancer Risk

a pair of die, DNA and a hand holding a globe with a tree inside wiht sequencing in the background

In January 2015, a paper in Science created a “buzz” in the scientific community and the media. Based on statistical modelling, the authors suggested that “only a third of the variation in cancer risk among tissues is attributable to environmental factors or inherited predispositions. The majority is due to ‘bad luck,’ that is, random mutations Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics and Lisa C. Richardson, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 Comment

Making Universal Screening for Lynch Syndrome a Reality: The Lynch Syndrome Screening Network

flow chart individual

Every day, about 400 people in the United States are diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Approximately twelve of them have Lynch syndrome, a hereditary condition that increases the risk of colorectal cancer and other cancers.  Identifying people with Lynch syndrome could have substantial health benefits for them, their families, and communities.   Read More >

Posted on by Deb Duquette, MS, CGC & Sarah Mange, MPH- Michigan Department of Community Health; Cecelia Bellcross, PhD, MS- Emory University; Heather Hampel, MS, CGC- The Ohio State University; Kory Jasperson, MS, CGC- Huntsman Cancer Institute (Authors are all from the Lynch Syndrome Screening Network (LSSN) Founding Board of Directors)1 CommentTags , , , , ,