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The Future of Wearable Technology in the Workplace

Categories: Technology

 

Mention of a product or service does not constitute and endorsement by NIOSH or the Department of Health and Human Services.

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Author wearing Google Glasses. Photo courtesy of Dr. Nabeel.

An era of remarkable innovation is underway. We’re looking at the advent of brand-new technologies called “Wearable Computers”. Wearable computers, also known as body-borne computers or wearables, are defined as “miniature electronic devices that are worn by the bearer under, with or on top of clothing”. (dictionary.com). We are already starting to appreciate their presence in our daily lives as people start wearing devices like Fitbit, Nike fuel band, Jawbone Up, Pebble Watch, even the device to track dog’s activity, “Whistle”.

In early 2013, I became part of the select group of 8,000 selected for the social experiment conducted by Google called the “Google Glass Explorer Program”.   The goal for this unique national social experiment was to figure out how wearable computers could work in a complex social setting. Last year, I was fortunate to be invited to present my experiences to NIOSH staff in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Be Pioneers to Protect Our Volunteers!

Categories: Emergency Response/Public Sector

oneresponder_beach (2)Emergency responders, such as police officers, fire fighters, and paramedics, are often on the front lines during a disaster, which makes them particularly vulnerable to work-related injuries and illnesses during a response. The scientific community has some knowledge about occupational injuries and illnesses among these groups from surveillance systems currently in place, notably the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII), but the BLS database does not include volunteers.   What about the courageous responders from volunteer organizations or volunteer fire fighters and paramedics at local and county levels?

Can Workplace Exposures Increase Risks of Birth Defects? – Epidemiology in Action

Categories: Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing, Epidemiology, Exposure, Reproductive Health, Women

Epidemiology is the art and science of using data to answer questions about the health of groups. In occupational epidemiology, we use that data to understand how work affects health. This blog entry is part of a series that shares the stories behind the data.

Pregnant and breastfeeding women get a lot of advice from just about everyone on just about everything– what to eat, medications to avoid, how much exercise they should do. When it comes to their jobs, though, the advice seems to dry up. That’s because occupational exposure limits are based on studies of healthy, non-pregnant workers and many early studies of occupational hazards were limited to men. These recommended exposure limits might not be sufficient to protect a developing fetus. We are trying to find out whether things people were exposed to at work like chemicals, noise, shift work, radiation, or germs affect their pregnancy outcomes and health of their children. One of the outcomes we study is birth defects.

Your NIOSH Top 5 for 2014

Categories: Observances

 

What did you read in 2014? While we aren’t privy to your favorite beach read or your book club selections, we do know what caught your eye on the NIOSH blog and website. Your favorite blogs last year are listed below.

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