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“Safety Matters” —Bringing Work Safety and Health to the Classroom

Categories: Training, Young Workers

young worker_8 fw

Illustration by Chi-Yun Lau

Every day, young workers face injury, illness and even death on the job. Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics show that about 1.5 million teenagers from 15 through 17 years old work in the United States. Studies show that nearly 8 of 10 high school students in the United States work at some point during their school years. Each year, about 60,000 of these young workers are injured seriously enough to warrant a trip to the emergency room. Data also show that workers under age 25 are twice as likely as adults to be injured on the job.

Safety and Health for Immigrant Workers

Categories: Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing, Construction, Occupational Health Equity, Outdoor Work, Personal Protective Equipment, Training


The United States workforce, like the population in general, is becoming more ethnically diverse. “We are and always will be a nation of immigrants,” President Obama stated recently in announcing his initiative on immigration reform. The Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project estimates that immigrants will make up roughly 23% of adults of working age in 2050, up from 15% in 2005 (Passel & Cohn, 2008). It is also predicted that immigrants and their children will make up 83% of the growth in the working age population of the U.S. during this same time period (Congressional Budget Office, 2005). Immigration from Latin America to the U.S. has grown dramatically over the past 2 decades and will figure prominently in these numbers. Currently, about 18 million Latino immigrants live in the U.S. (Batalova & Terrazas, 2010).

Latino workers suffer significantly higher rates of workplace fatalities (5.0 per 100,000 workers) than all workers combined (4.0), non-Latino white workers (4.0) or non-Latino black workers (3.7) (Cierpich, Styles, Harrison, et al., 2008). Considered alone, Latino immigrants to the U.S. have a workplace fatality rate of 5.9 per 100,000 which is almost 50% higher than the rate for all workers (4.0). In 2013, two-thirds of work-related deaths among Latinos were among foreign-born individuals, up from slightly more than half in 1992. These data suggest that fatalities among immigrant workers may be the driving force behind the elevated rates of workplace injuries and illnesses among Latinos in the U.S.

Free Online Emergency Responder Health Monitoring and Surveillance Training

Categories: Emergency Response/Public Sector, Training

An Emergency Responder Health Monitoring and Surveillance (ERHMS) system is a critical component in protecting emergency workers from the safety and health risks inherent in emergency response work.  An ERHMS system includes specific recommendations and tools for all phases of a response, including the pre-deployment, deployment, and post-deployment phase.  Medical monitoring and surveillance can help  identify worker exposures and  symptoms early in the course of an emergency response which in turn can prevent or reduce  adverse physical and psychological outcomes.

Free On-line Violence Prevention Training for Nurses

Categories: Construction, Healthcare, Training, Violence

In 2012, the Healthcare and Social Assistance (HCSA) sector was amongst the largest industry sectors in the U.S. employing an estimated 19.4 million workers (13.5% of the total workforce)[1]. On average, over the last decade, U.S. healthcare workers have accounted for two-thirds of the nonfatal workplace violence injuries in all industries involving days away from work [2].  Healthcare workers face the risk of both physical violence and non-physical violence, such as verbal abuse, on the job.  These numbers represent only the assaults that resulted in time away from work and not the less severe physical injuries or the psychological trauma that HCSA workers experience from workplace violence. Additionally, these data only capture the reported incidents.  The literature suggests that the number of assaults reported by healthcare workers is greatly underreported.

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