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Selected Category: Construction

Protect Yourself at Work: A Series of Print and Video Materials for Spanish-speaking Immigrant Workers

Categories: Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing, Communication, Construction, Occupational Health Equity, Service Sector


Recently, NIOSH released a series of multi-media communication products for organizations that serve Spanish-speaking immigrant workers entitled Protéjase en el trabajo (Protect yourself at work). This series of products is a result of a multi-faceted project that includes 1) a partnership between NIOSH and the Mexican Consulates in the U.S. and 2) the development of illustrated materials for workers created through community outreach, engagement and input. The series includes 4 booklets/brochures, 2 posters, and 5 testimonial videos. The purpose of these materials is to provide evidence-based information to raise awareness about potential occupational safety and health issues and encourage workers to seek assistance for work-related questions or concerns. These new products are not meant to take the place of existing training and educational materials or intended to replace industry guidance and training, but instead serve as another venue to provide education and knowledge to these workers.

Overlapping Vulnerabilities

Categories: Construction, Occupational Health Equity, Small Business, Young Workers


cvr2015-178cNot all workers have the same risk of being injured at work, even when they are in the same industry or have the same occupation. Different factors can make some workers more vulnerable than others to workplace illness or injury. These include social dynamics, such as age, race, class, and gender; economic trends, such as growth of the temporary workforce; and organizational factors, such as business size.

The term “occupational health disparities” refers to increased rates of work-related illness and injuries in particular vulnerable populations. A growing body of research explores how a particular characteristic—such as being an immigrant/foreign-born worker, a worker under the age of 25, or an employee of a small business—can increase an individu­al’s risk for workplace injury or illness, and it suggests effective ways to improve the safety and health of these workers.

NIOSH, Nail Guns, and Consensus Standards: Where We Stand

Categories: Construction


Recently, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) released a revision to ANSI SNT-101, “American National Standard for Power Tools – Safety Requirements for Portable, Compressed-Air-Actuated, Fastener Driving Tools (ANSI SNT-101 2015)” (i.e., nail guns). NIOSH participated in the consensus process used to revise the standard. In all stages, NIOSH recommended changes that were consistent with the current scientific research about the safety risks attributable to nail guns, and interventions that are available to reduce them. Despite NIOSH’s participation throughout the consensus process, the revised ANSI standard does not reflect current scientific research evidence and is therefore not sufficiently protective of workers. We encourage stakeholders to rely on NIOSH publications on nail guns for the most protective recommendations concerning nail gun safety.

The Stand-Down Is On! Join the National Safety Stand-down to Prevent Falls in Construction

Categories: Construction, Falls, Observances

fallsThe construction industry is one of the most dangerous, and within construction, falls are the leading cause of death and injury. Every year, workers fall from ladders and roofs, down stairs, through floors and holes, and off of scaffolding. In 2013 across the United States, three-hundred and five construction workers died because of a fall. These fatalities were preventable.

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