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Immigrant Worker Safety and Health

Immigrant workers face a disproportionate risk for workplace injury and illness. At the Safety, Health and Social Justice for Immigrant Workers - Lessons from the NIOSH Environmental Justice Projects session of the 2008 American Public Health Association's annual conference "Public Health Without Borders" (October 25-29), a panel will present the experiences from six of the environmental justice projects addressing safety and health concerns of immigrants working in farming, poultry processing, and restaurant and domestic work. For those unable to attend the session, we would appreciate feedback through this blog. Specifically, what experience have others had with developing successful interventions for immigrant workers? Additionally, what types of materials are needed to better assist safety and health professional to provide information and training to foreign-born workers? Read More >

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Research to Practice for Injury Prevention

NIOSH is hosting the fourth National Occupational Injury Research Symposium (NOIRS) on October 21-23, 2008, at the Sheraton Station Square in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. NOIRS is the only national forum for presenting research methods, data, and findings focused exclusively on the prevention of occupational injuries. The goal of the NOIRS is to provide a forum for researchers and other professionals to share their findings and experiences aimed at preventing traumatic occupational injuries through research and prevention. Read More >

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Preventing Health Hazards from Metal Working Fluids

Metal working fluids are used to lubricate, cool, prevent corrosion of, and remove chips from tools and metal parts during grinding, cutting, or boring operations. There are several types of MWFs: straight or soluble oils, semisynthetic oils, and synthetic oils. Exposures to MWFs can occur through inhaling aerosols, skin contact with contaminated surfaces, and splashing of fluids. Employees who have been exposed to MWFs often report skin disorders (skin irritations, oil acne, and rashes); eye, nose, and throat irritation; and respiratory symptoms (cough, asthma, or other breathing problems). Read More >

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