Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Genomics and Health Impact Blog Posts

The need for a next-generation public health response to rare diseases.

a crowd of people in grey and one individual standing out in color and double helices on the border of the image

In recognition of Rare Disease Day 2017, we republish, with permission, a modified extract from our recent commentary in Genetics in Medicine. Few public health research activities trigger stronger calls to public health action than research into the burden of disease. This research uses standard measures to quantify actual or potential losses that populations may Read More >

Posted on by Rodolfo Valdez (guest blogger), Scott D. Grosse (guest blogger), National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities & Muin J. Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

Implementation Science in Genomic Medicine: Why we need it now!

DNA, a hand holding a test tube, electronic health record, a doctor talking to a girl and a person looking at data

With the launch of the precision medicine cohort initiative, All of UsSM  Research Program, the importance of incorporating implementation science in genomic medicine is greater than ever to ensure population health benefits for all. Historically, the speed of genomic discovery has far exceeded the time required to put these potentially life-saving medical discoveries into practice. Read More >

Posted on by Megan C. Roberts (guest blogger), David A. Chambers (guest blogger), Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland and Muin J. Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags , ,

Can we use genetic screening of healthy populations to save lives and prevent disease? Join the conversation.

a doctor looking into a crystal ball filled with people - he is surrounded by a babies feet with bloodspots and a crowd of people and a stop sign with cancer on it and a stethoscope listening to a heart

On January 30, 2017, CDC held a special workshop to discuss the role of public health in the implementation of genetic screening programs beyond the newborn period. The workshop brought together panelists from the worlds of medical genetics and public health practice, including cancer, birth defects, and laboratory science. Workshop presenters and a CDC panel discussed Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention4 CommentsTags ,

The Appropriateness and Cost of Thrombophilia Panel Testing: It’s Complicated

blood clot

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are two manifestations of venous thromboembolism (VTE), an underdiagnosed, serious, and sometimes-preventable medical condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a deep vein (DVT) and subsequently breaks up and travels to the lungs (PE). DVT/PE is a serious public health problem [PDF 1.15 MB] affecting Read More >

Posted on by Scott Bowen, MPH, Office of Public Health Genomics, Division of Public Health Information Dissemination, Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services and Scott D. Grosse, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags ,

2016: The Year of Precision Public Health!

2016 with DNA on the 0 and a bunch of people

In our 2015 end-of-year blog post entitled: “Public health genomics 2015: Looking back, looking ahead”, we predicted that 2016 will feature a more in-depth exploration of “key concepts for the development of precision public health beyond genomics to include a variety of personal and environmental data for preventing disease and promoting health.” One year later, Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 Comment

From One Hundred Thousand Genomes in the United Kingdom to Millions of Genomes in the United States: What Lessons Can we Learn?

A map of the US and UK with sequencing

In recent years, the United Kingdom (UK) has made a major commitment to developing a large scale population cohort study (100,000 genome project), linking high quality genomic sequence data to electronic health record information for the purposes of scientific discovery and clinical care improvement.  The plan is for this project to continue well into the Read More >

Posted on by W. Gregory Feero, Guest Blogger, Maine Dartmouth Family Medicine Residency, and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a comment

Happy Thanksgiving: Collect & Act on Your Family Health History

a multigenerational family eating a Thanksgiving meal with DNA

As you celebrate Thanksgiving with your family this November, remember that this special day is also National Family Health History Day. Family health history is important to your health and can help you detect unique disease risks and manage them before becoming sick, or find the right diagnosis and treatments when you have a certain Read More >

Posted on by Bob Wildin MD, Guest Blogger, Genomic Healthcare Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute and Muin J. Khoury MD, PhD, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

Tracking Translation of Human Genome Discoveries into Prevention and Control of Common Chronic Diseases: The Action is in Cancer!

cancer cells with DNA and a few people in the foreground

Genomics seems to be everywhere these days. From the Human Genome Project to the Precision Medicine Initiative and from the Cancer Moonshot to breakthroughs in genome editing, we are overwhelmed with information about genomics. The hope and hype of discoveries are intermixed daily in published scientific articles and media coverage of how they might improve Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury MD, PhD, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, and Lisa Richardson, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a comment

What Gets Measured Gets Done: Public Health Progress in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

a heart with a graph and people in the foreground

Just 4 years ago, one of us (MJK) co-chaired the Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) Foundation’s first FH Global Summit: Awareness to Action held in Annapolis, Maryland. The Summit brought together people from academia, government, the private sector, clinicians, as well as patients with the ambitious goals of raising awareness of FH, identifying key knowledge gaps, and Read More >

Posted on by Joshua Knowles MD, guest blogger, Stanford University School of Medicine and Muin J. Khoury MD, PhD, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia1 CommentTags

The Cancer Moonshot, Hereditary Cancers and Population Genetic Screening

Cancer Moonshot with an image of a moon surrounded by DNA and a crowd of people

In September 2016, the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel delivered a report with 10 ambitious recommendations to shape cancer research for the next five years. One recommendation is to “expand use of proven prevention and early detection strategies.” [PDF 199 KB] There is a lot we can do to prevent cancer now— even with no Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Lisa C. Richardson, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a comment
TOP