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Genomics and Health Impact Blog Posts

If You Build It Will They Come? The Urgent Need for Implementation Science in Genomic Medicine

an empty baseball field with DNA

As the evidence base for genomic medicine grows, evaluating and implementing genomics to improve health care and population health remains an ongoing challenge. There is no guarantee that “if we build it they will come,” paraphrasing the well-known expression from the movie, Field of Dreams. To improve adoption, uptake and sustainability of genomic medicine applications, Read More >

Posted on by Mindy Clyne, Megan Roberts, Guest Bloggers, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute and Muin J, Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags ,

Public health genomics information is now easily accessible online

screenshot of PHGKB homepage

The amount of emerging genomic information related to healthcare and public health is staggering. PHGKB is a one-stop shop for information relevant to genomics translation and population health impact for almost all diseases across the life span. MyPHGKB allows end users to customize their own PHGKB databases and type of information. The Public Health Genomics Read More >

Posted on by Wei Yu and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags , , ,

Happy Thanksgiving 2017: Take time to collect, share, and act on your family health history, it may save your life!

Happy Thanksgiving 2017 with an image of DNA and pumpkins and leaves

Regular readers of this blog may have noticed that we have an almost identical message around each Thanksgiving Day. Collect, share, and act on your family health history! It seems every year we emphasize a slightly different version of this message. In 2016, we highlighted the emergence of new tools that can help consumers and Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a comment

Genomics and Precision Medicine: How Can Emerging Technologies Address Population Health Disparities? Join the Conversation.

different people standing on DNA in front of a world map

Advances in genome sequencing, other “omic” technologies, and big data promise a new era of personalized medicine. However, there is an ongoing discussion how these new technologies can be used to understand and address existing population health disparities. On October 11, 2017, the Precision Medicine and Population Health Interest Group in the Division of Cancer Read More >

Posted on by Wylie Burke, Professor Emeritus and former Chair, Department of Bioethics and Humanities, University of Washington, Charles Rotimi, Director, Center for Research on Genomics and Global Health, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes for Health, Debbie Winn, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Vence Bonham and Michael Hahn, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes for Health, Muin J, Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags

Integrating Pharmacogenomics in Practice: One GIFT at a Time or a Package Deal?

a present opened with DNA capsuls spilling out of them

Testing for genetic variants related to warfarin metabolism has been the poster child for pharmacogenomics in clinical practice for over a decade. A recent publication of the Genetic Informatics Trial (GIFT) provides additional evidence for the clinical benefits of incorporating pharmacogenomics testing into the management of warfarin initiation. In this multicenter study of older individuals Read More >

Posted on by W. Gregory Feero M.D., Ph.D. Faculty, Maine-Dartmouth Family Medicine Residency Program, Augusta, Maine and Muin J. Khoury, MD, PhD, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , ,

Trends and Factors Affecting Utilization of BRCA Testing in the United States: The Need for Improved Surveillance

hands holding a pink ribbon with the US map in the background

This blog post is a summary of two recent CDC papers on the trends in utilization of BRCA testing in the United States, and metropolitan-nonmetropolitan areas differences in testing. Women with pathogenic BRCA mutations have an estimated 45–65% risk of breast cancer and a 17–39% risk of ovarian cancer by age 70, as compared with Read More >

Posted on by Katherine Kolor, Zhuo Chen, and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

Integrating genomics into population-based cancer surveillance in the era of precision medicine

individuals all over a map of the US with DNA and a magnifiying glass on one person

Population-based cancer surveillance provides a quantitative measurement of cancer occurrence in the United States and globally. Core activities of surveillance include measuring cancer incidence and characterizing each cancer with regard to histopathology, stage, and treatment in the context of survival. Cancer surveillance has been crucial in informing policy and practice, as well as clinical and Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia and Lynne Penberthy, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer InstituteLeave a commentTags ,

A New Public Health Assessment of the Disease Burden of Hereditary Hemochromatosis: How Clinically Actionable is C282Y Homozygosity?

blood cells

This blog post is based on a recent paper by Grosse, Gurrin, Bertalli, and Allen in Genetics in Medicine. Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) attributable to mutations in the HFE gene is the most common autosomal recessive disorder among adults of northern European origin. It occurs in 1 in 300 non-Hispanic whites in the United States. Approximately Read More >

Posted on by Scott D. Grosse, Guest blogger, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags , ,

Accelerating Evidence Generation to Fulfill the Promise of Genomic Medicine

a long road with a lighting speed trail, a computer monitor with electronic health record displayed and DNA in the sky

This blog post is a summary of a recently published paper in Genetics in Medicine. Genomic tests should demonstrate analytical and clinical validity and clinical utility prior to wider adoption in clinical practice. However, clinical utility remains elusive for many such tests. A recent collaborative review of systematic reviews that compared the analytic and clinical Read More >

Posted on by Christine Y Lu, guest blogger, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Leave a commentTags ,

Cascade Screening for Familial Hypercholesterolemia in the United States: Public Health Impact and Challenges

a predigree with hearts on a US map

This post is a summary of our recently published paper in JAMA and outlines the public health impact and challenges for cascade screening for Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) in the United States.   What is the public health impact of cascade screening for FH? FH is a dominantly-inherited genetic disorder affecting about 1 in 250 people and Read More >

Posted on by Joshua W. Knowles, guest blogger, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Cardiovascular Institute Stanford University, California; Daniel J. Rader, guest blogger, Department of Human Genetics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Atlanta, GALeave a commentTags ,
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