Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Genomics and Health Impact Blog Posts

Integrating genomics into population-based cancer surveillance in the era of precision medicine

individuals all over a map of the US with DNA and a magnifiying glass on one person

Population-based cancer surveillance provides a quantitative measurement of cancer occurrence in the United States and globally. Core activities of surveillance include measuring cancer incidence and characterizing each cancer with regard to histopathology, stage, and treatment in the context of survival. Cancer surveillance has been crucial in informing policy and practice, as well as clinical and Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia and Lynne Penberthy, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer InstituteLeave a commentTags

A New Public Health Assessment of the Disease Burden of Hereditary Hemochromatosis: How Clinically Actionable is C282Y Homozygosity?

blood cells

This blog post is based on a recent paper by Grosse, Gurrin, Bertalli, and Allen in Genetics in Medicine. Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) attributable to mutations in the HFE gene is the most common autosomal recessive disorder among adults of northern European origin. It occurs in 1 in 300 non-Hispanic whites in the United States. Approximately Read More >

Posted on by Scott D. Grosse, Guest blogger, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags , ,

Accelerating Evidence Generation to Fulfill the Promise of Genomic Medicine

a long road with a lighting speed trail, a computer monitor with electronic health record displayed and DNA in the sky

This blog post is a summary of a recently published paper in Genetics in Medicine. Genomic tests should demonstrate analytical and clinical validity and clinical utility prior to wider adoption in clinical practice. However, clinical utility remains elusive for many such tests. A recent collaborative review of systematic reviews that compared the analytic and clinical Read More >

Posted on by Christine Y Lu, guest blogger, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Leave a commentTags ,

Cascade Screening for Familial Hypercholesterolemia in the United States: Public Health Impact and Challenges

a predigree with hearts on a US map

This post is a summary of our recently published paper in JAMA and outlines the public health impact and challenges for cascade screening for Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) in the United States.   What is the public health impact of cascade screening for FH? FH is a dominantly-inherited genetic disorder affecting about 1 in 250 people and Read More >

Posted on by Joshua W. Knowles, guest blogger, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Cardiovascular Institute Stanford University, California; Daniel J. Rader, guest blogger, Department of Human Genetics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Atlanta, GALeave a commentTags ,

Is pharmacogenetic-guided treatment cost-effective? No one size fits all!

a pill filled with DNA and dollar signs around

A recently published article by M. Verbelen and colleagues in The Pharmacogenomics Journal is called, “Cost-effectiveness of pharmacogenetic-guided treatment: are we there yet?” As Betteridge’s law of headlines states, any headline that ends in a question mark can be answered by the word No. Regrettably, although that article presents useful information, it ends up by Read More >

Posted on by Scott D. Grosse, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities and W. Dave Dotson, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags

Integrating Genomics into Public Health Surveillance: Ushering in a New Era of Precision Public Health

a crowd of people standing on sequincing and DNA and data graphs

Public health surveillance has been defined as “the ongoing systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data, closely integrated with the dissemination of these data to the public health practitioners, clinicians, and policy makers responsible for preventing and controlling disease and injury.” Surveillance provides an essential scientific foundation for both clinical and public health practice. In Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a comment

Whole Genome Sequencing for All? The Quest for Evidence Continues

a clinician holdig a stethoscope with DNA on the side

In 1999, Dr. Francis Collins predicted what the practice of genomic medicine in primary care may look like in 2010. He used a hypothetical patient named John, a 23-year-old man with high serum cholesterol. Based on his father’s history of early onset heart disease, John underwent a battery of genetic tests. He was found to Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention2 CommentsTags

Precision Public Health: Harnessing the Power of the Human Microbiome

four figures holding puzzle pieces standing on microbiome cells and DNA on the sides

The discovery of antibiotics by Sir Alexander Fleming in 1928 revolutionized medicine. However, antibiotics cannot differentiate between the beneficial bacteria that help keep us healthy and the pathogens that make us sick. Like a wildfire, antibiotics wipe out all bacteria. Consequently, we have been altering our microbiomes for almost a century, putting ourselves at risk Read More >

Posted on by Alison Laufer Halpin, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID)3 CommentsTags

Are there any shortcuts on the translation highway to genomic medicine?

a long curved road with a curve caution sign and the road is paved with ATCG

Note to our readers: A modified version of this blog post has been published in JAMA. Rapid advances in genomics have led to a new era of precision medicine, resulting in a dramatic increase in the number of genomic tests available for research and clinical practice. As of April 18, 2017, the Genetic Testing Registry, Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a comment

Genome Sequencing for Healthy Individuals? Think Big and Act Small!

a crowd of people with a magnifying glass on a few and DNA

In a 2013 blog post, we asked the question: “When should we all have our genomes sequenced?” At that time, we concluded that the time is not right and that “if we want to use whole genome sequencing in the course of regular preventive care and health promotion, research should be conducted to evaluate its Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Greg Feero, guest blogger, Maine Dartmouth Family Medicine ResidencyLeave a commentTags ,
TOP