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Category: genomics

Recommendations and Reality: What Personal Stories of Hereditary Cancer Can Tell Us

four photos of Sarah, Dave, Zac and Gloria (reading order starting top left)

In public health and clinical medicine, recommendations for interventions are generally based on the evidence supporting improved health outcomes. Studies that inform these recommendations often focus on the evidence for benefits, especially when those benefits include lives saved. The harms that affect quality of life are more challenging to quantify and sometimes go unmeasured. Recommendations Read More >

Posted on by Ridgely Fisk Green, Carter Consulting, Inc., and Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Katrina Trivers, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags ,

Infectious Diseases: Precision Medicine for Public Health

a person with a respirator holding a disc wioptical mappingth

Until now, most medical treatments have been designed for the “average patient.” As a result of this “one-size-fits-all” approach, treatments can be very successful for some patients but not for others. Precision Medicine, on the other hand, is an innovative approach that takes into account individual differences in people’s genes, environments, and lifestyles. The Precision Read More >

Posted on by Marta Gwinn, Consultant, McKing Consulting Corp, Office of Public Health Genomics and Duncan MacCannell (NCEZID), Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

Precision Medicine, Implementation Science and Public Health: How Do We Scale Up From 1 Million to 300 Million?

figure with magnifying glass looking at the US map

Planning for the 2015 Presidential Precision Medicine Initiative is in full swing. After the initial announcement in January 2015, several workshops were held to help in design and execution of the longitudinal cohort study of 1 million persons. The workshops covered important topics including a Building a Precision Medicine Research Cohort, Scientific Opportunities, Digital Health Data, Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

Precision Medicine and Public Health: Improving Health Now While Generating New Knowledge for the Future

a crowd

In a previous post, I commented on the importance of a public health perspective to ensure the success of the proposed precision medicine large national research cohort. Here I offer additional thoughts on the need to balance short term public health gains with long term knowledge generation from this effort. Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

The Ultimate Selfie

reflect4

Now within reach, our personal genomic sequence offers an incredible reflection of who we are, and great promise to improve human health, but there are serious concerns about embracing it too quickly. Empowered Consumers in the Era of Me If social media is any indication, we, like Narcissus of ancient myth, are surely self-obsessed creatures. Read More >

Posted on by Scott Bowen and Muin J Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention2 CommentsTags , , , ,

Using Genomics in Precision Prevention of Breast Cancer

Hands joined in circle holding breast cancer struggle symbol and surrounded by DNA

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the United States. It is estimated that 3%-5% of breast cancer cases are hereditary, most often involving mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Such mutations confer high lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The United States Preventive Services Task Force has issued specific recommendations Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics and Lisa C Richardson, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

When a Country Cannot be a Cohort: Challenges of Implementing a Large Precision Medicine Cohort Study in the United States

a huge crowd versus a small group of people

The recently proposed US precision medicine initiative promises a new era of healthcare with targeted disease treatment and prevention. It prominently features a longitudinal study of a national cohort of a million or more people to customize interventions based on a person’s genetics and other factors. The long term goal of this study is to Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags ,

Precision Public Health and Precision Medicine: Two Peas in a Pod

two peas is a pod: first pea has a crowd of figures with one under a magnifying glass- second pod has that individual being examined by a doctor- the pod has DNA on it

  The 2015 US Precision Medicine Initiative promises a new era of biomedical research and its application in health care. The initiative is enabled by rapid advances in biomedical sciences, including genomics and bioinformatics, as well as the progress in communication, information technologies and data science. Targeted cancer therapies are a near term goal for Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags ,

Human Disease and Bad Luck: Acting on Genetic & Environmental Factors to Reduce Cancer Risk

a pair of die, DNA and a hand holding a globe with a tree inside wiht sequencing in the background

In January 2015, a paper in Science created a “buzz” in the scientific community and the media. Based on statistical modelling, the authors suggested that “only a third of the variation in cancer risk among tissues is attributable to environmental factors or inherited predispositions. The majority is due to ‘bad luck,’ that is, random mutations Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics and Lisa C. Richardson, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 Comment

100,000 Studies: A Milestone for Human Genome Epidemiology (HuGE) and the HuGE Navigator

a HUGE odometer with 100000 on it

The HuGE published literature database now contains more than 100,000 citations, a milestone reached at the end of 2014. The Office of Public Health Genomics has compiled this database since 2001 via weekly systematic sweeps of PubMed performed by a single curator. For the first five years, a complex PubMed query was used to identify Read More >

Posted on by Marta Gwinn, Consultant, McKing Consulting Corp, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , , ,
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