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Category: genomics

Celebrating a Decade of Evidence-Based Evaluation of Genomic Tests

Ira Lubin, Doris Zallen, Dave Dotson, Sheri Schully, Marc Williams, Ned Calonge, Roger Klein, Muin Khoury and Cecile Janssens at the EGAPP meeting

CDC’s Office of Public Health Genomics (OPHG) launched the Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention Initiative (EGAPP) in 2004. The independent EGAPP Working Group (EWG) celebrated a decade of achievements and accomplishments at their meeting in Atlanta on October 27-28, 2014. The EWG is comprised entirely of volunteers, encompassing multiples areas of expertise Read More >

Posted on by W. David Dotson and Muin J Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , , ,

What is a “rare disease”? Polio eradication and primary immunodeficiency

a child getting the polio vaccine

During the last two decades, surveillance and strategic vaccination campaigns deployed by the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) have reduced polio incidence worldwide by more than 99 percent. Wild poliovirus (WPV) cases are now uncommon, with only 222 new cases reported worldwide so far in 2014.* Endemic transmission is now limited to areas of just Read More >

Posted on by Marta Gwinn, Consultant, McKing Consulting Corp, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , , ,

Family health history is a non-modifiable risk factor—or is it?

a family biking

“I met three different women who had been tested [genetic testing for mutations in the BReast CAncer susceptibility (BRCA) genes] early on, in 1996, when the BRCA test first came out. They told me their family history story of mothers, aunts, uncles, and a dad who suffered from breast or ovarian or related cancers, and Read More >

Posted on by Ridgely Fisk Green,Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers For Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , ,

Every Cause Needs a Champion: Jean Chabut as a Public Health Genomics Pioneer

Cham·pi·on noun \ˈcham-pē-ən\: someone who fights or speaks publicly in support of a person, belief, cause, etc.  Most public health programs can point to a key person or group who was instrumental in assuring not only the program’s successful introduction but also its long-term viability. Jean Chabut was that champion for public health genomics in Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury and Scott Bowen, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags

Public Health Approach to Big Data in the Age of Genomics: How Can we Separate Signal from Noise?

graph

The term Big Data is used to describe massive volumes of both structured and unstructured data that is so large and complex it is difficult to process and analyze. Examples of big data include the following: diagnostic medical imaging, DNA sequencing and other molecular technologies, environmental exposures, behavioral factors, financial transactions, geographic information & social Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags ,

Outsmarting Antimicrobial-Resistant Pathogens

bacterial cultures

The evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is occurring at an alarming rate and is outpacing the development of new countermeasures. —White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, September 18, 2014 In the contest between humans and pathogens, each faction has an evolutionary advantage: we have the brains to plot antimicrobial strategies but they Read More >

Posted on by Marta Gwinn, Consultant, McKing Consulting Corp, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention & Clifford McDonald, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, NCEZID, CDCLeave a commentTags ,

Suicide, Family History, and Genomics

Robin Williams speaks to troups

We must continue to search for new methods to effectively address the tremendous problem of suicide. Despite recent interest, genomics does not provide the solution today, but there is a lot that we can do now using an established public health approach to prevention.   Millions were shocked by the news that comedian Robin Williams Read More >

Posted on by Scott Bowen, OPHG and Brad Bartholow with National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC StaffLeave a commentTags , ,

Is Genomics Widening the Schism Between Medicine and Public Health?

Grand Canyon

In 2007, we published a paper entitled: “Will genomics heal or widen the schism between medicine and public health?” We explored the long standing split between medicine and public health and how the emergence of genomics and other technologies can affect it. The “schism” was identified by Kerr White in his 1991 book in which Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , ,

Nobody is average but what to do about it? The challenge of individualized disease prevention based on genomics

Nobody is Average- a normal distribution curve with figures inside it and DNA as the curve

  Each week, Garrison Keillor shares with National Public Radio listeners the latest news from Lake Wobegon where “all the women are strong, all the men are good looking, and all the children are above average.” The concept of “average” is deeply rooted in our scientific analysis of all health related traits such as height, Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , ,

Geography, Genetics and Leading Causes of Death

a mortality map of the US with secuencing in the background

In the United States, the 5 leading causes of death are heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, cerebrovascular diseases (stroke), and unintentional injuries. On May 2, 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released an MMWR report on the annual number of potentially preventable deaths from these 5 causes in the United States. Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , , ,
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