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Genomics and Health Impact Blog Posts

Precision Public Health: Reconciling Biological and Social Determinants of Health

a mother and child surrounded by DNA and several images of environmental factors

On June 6-7, 2016, I had the honor of participating in the “Precision Public Health” summit hosted by the Gates Foundation and the White House Office of Science and Technology at the University of California in San Francisco. The summit focused on developing a global “precision” agenda to improve health and prevent death and disease Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

The Shift From Personalized Medicine to Precision Medicine and Precision Public Health: Words Matter!

crowd with on figure standing out and DNA on the top

Advances in genomics and other ‘omic’ technologies have ushered in a new era variably called “personalized” or “precision” medicine, which takes into account individual genetic and other sources of variability in disease treatment and prevention. In the past decade, we have seen a significant growth in interest and usage of the terms personalized and precision Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a comment

Does genetic risk information improve healthy behavior? Let’s not throw out the baby with the bath water!

a double helix in a green circle, a glass of alcohol in a red circle wth a slash through it, a No Smoking stop sign, excercise equipement, an apple and a Screening door tag

In a recent systematic review with meta-analysis, Hollands et al evaluated the impact of communicating genetic risk information on risk-reducing health behaviors and motivations for behavior change. The authors reviewed 18 studies with 7 behavioral outcomes, including smoking cessation, diet and physical activity. They found no significant effects of communicating DNA based risk estimates on Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags ,

Newborn screening for severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) saves lives and money: a cost-effective public health policy

Couple with their child

Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID), also known as “bubble boy disease,” is a rare inherited disorder of the immune system that leads to recurrent severe infections. In the absence of effective treatment, SCID is usually fatal within the first 2 years of life. Treatment by hematopoietic cell transplantation can minimize the devastating effects of SCID, Read More >

Posted on by Scott D. Grosse, Health Economist, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , ,

Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing and Public Health Education

a woman looking at her spit in a test tube, sequencing wrapped around a hand, a person looking at double helix on a monitor, a person discussion her genetic test results with a counslor and a crowd of people

We have previously blogged about the value (or lack thereof) of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests in improving health. In a 2011 blog entitled “think before you spit” we cautioned that there was very little evidence that the use of such tests improves health and prevents disease for healthy people in the population. The blog was Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , , ,

Rare Diseases, Genomics and Public Health: An Expanding Intersection

Rare Diseases with DNA and an intersection

Rare Disease Day is celebrated on the last day of February each year. On that day, millions of patients and their families around the world share their stories in order to raise awareness about rare diseases and their impact. There are thousands of diseases that are individually rare but collectively common. In the United States, Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics; Rodolfo Valdez, epidemiologist, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

Cancer Precision Medicine: More Population Sciences Ahead!

cancer precision medicne sign pointing ahead into a crowd of people

We explore briefly the expanding role of population sciences in the implementation of the NIH Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI). The initiative includes a major component on cancer precision treatment, and a large scale cohort study program to generate knowledge applicable to all areas of health and disease, including cancer risk factors and outcomes. Genomics is Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury MD, PhD, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia and Debbie Winn PhD, Deputy Director, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MarylandLeave a commentTags

Precision Medicine: the Arrival of Genomics to the Clinic is the Beginning of a Longer Journey

examining room with DNA sequencing on the wall

It has been a year since the announcement of the new US Precision Medicine Initiative. As new funding is awarded to investigators across the country, the pace of assembling the cohort of a million or more individuals will accelerate. This cohort will link information from genomic, behavioral, social, environmental, and health outcomes to discover and Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Gregory Feero, MD, PhD, Maine Dartmouth Family Medicine ResidencyLeave a commentTags ,

Public Health Genomics 2015: Looking Back, Looking Ahead

2015 - the 0 has DNA on it and a 6 is sliding down - people in the foreground

In 2015, the United States launched the precision medicine initiative that includes a cancer component and a national cohort research study of one million or more people. While much of this initiative will take years to develop outputs for use in health care, a public health perspective is crucial to ensure the initiative’s success in Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

National Family History Day 2015: Thinking globally and acting locally

Multi Generation Family Celebrating Thanksgiving

Though you probably will not find greeting cards in stores celebrating this fact, Thanksgiving has been known as National Family History Day in the U.S. since 2004.  The Office of the U.S. Surgeon General and many federal, state and private partners have marked each year with events and announcements promoting the collection and use of family Read More >

Posted on by W. Gregory Feero, MD, PhD, Maine Dartmouth Family Medicine ResidencyLeave a commentTags , ,
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