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Category: genetics

Evidence Matters in Genomic Medicine- Round 2: Integrating Cancer Genomic Tests

stacked boxes with lettering

  In a previous blog, CDC’s Office of Public Health Genomics announced a list of health-related genomic tests and applications, stratified into three tiers according to the availability of scientific evidence and evidence-based recommendations as a result of systematic reviews.  The list is intended to promote information exchange and dialogue among researchers, providers, policy makers, and Read More >

Posted on by Michael P. Douglas and W. David Dotson, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags , , ,

Think After You Spit: Personal Genomic Tests May Offer a Teachable Moment

Patient is showing physician her DTC genetic test results

Personal genomic tests are now widely available and sold directly to consumers, but population-based data are limited on awareness, use and impact of these tests. In collaboration with 4 state public health genomics programs, we have recently reported  on consumer awareness and use of personal genomic tests using the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury and Katherine Kolor, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags , , ,

Peeling the Pyramid, Scaling the Onion—How to Implement Genomic Medicine

pyramid of onion slices

In spite of the promise of genomics and related technologies for a new era of precision healthcare and disease prevention, only a handful of genomic tests and applications have been recommended for use in clinical practice. Nevertheless, implementation of even the few recommended genomic tests is lagging.  For example, implementing the 2005 USPSTF recommendation on genetic Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , , ,

Workings of an Evidence-Based Genomic Panel

EGAPP logo

  Synopsis of the 24th Meeting of the Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention (EGAPP) Working Group The EGAPP working group (EWG) has held 24 meetings in the 7 years since they were first convened; the latest EGAPP meeting was May 7-8, 2012 on the campus of CDC in Atlanta. Since it is Read More >

Posted on by W. David Dotson and Michael P. Douglas, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , , , , , ,

Sharing the Burden of Obesity

world globe balanced on top of a scale including a DNA strand as the equator

  On May 7-9, the CDC Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, hosted a conference on Weight of the Nation™ in Washington, D.C.  The conference served to highlight progress in the prevention and control of obesity through policy and environmental strategies. The­ Weight of the Nation is also the title of an HBO Documentary Read More >

Posted on by Marta Gwinn, Consultant, McKing Consulting Corp, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags , , , ,

Genomic Tests and Population Health: An Online Catalog to Promote a Conversation on Evolving Evidence

stacked boxed with A T C G on them

  With the rapid emergence of genomic tests, healthcare providers, patients and policy makers need to know how useful they are and whether the benefits of their use outweigh potential harms to patients, families, and the population. CDC’s Office of Public Health Genomics now offers a list of health-related genomic tests and applications, stratified into Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention4 CommentsTags , , , , ,

Smoke Screen…

  Never Let Genetics Blind You to the Harsh Reality of Cigarettes The emerging field of genomics might one day provide some tools to help address the smoking epidemic.  However, smokers should never think that their genes can protect them from devastating harms or provide an easy way for them to quit later. In 2012, Read More >

Posted on by Scott Bowen, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers For Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , , ,

Ushering Public Health Practice into the 21st Century

Public Health Genomics

The April 2012  special issue of the journal Public Health Genomics includes 13 articles from the many presentations at the 4th National Conference on Genomics and Public Health in the United States: “Using Genetic Information to Improve Health Now and In the Future”.  The three-day conference sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,  Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , ,

Evidence Matters in Genomic Medicine

EGAPP logo

A new IOM report makes recommendations that aim to ensure that progress in omics-based test development is grounded in sound scientific evidence and is reproducible, resulting in improved health care and continued public trust in research.  Another new IOM roundtable workshop report discussed the differences in evidence required for clinical use, regulatory oversight, guideline inclusion, coverage, Read More >

Posted on by Michael P. Douglas and W. David Dotson, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags , ,

Making Universal Screening for Lynch Syndrome a Reality: The Lynch Syndrome Screening Network

flow chart individual

Every day, about 400 people in the United States are diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Approximately twelve of them have Lynch syndrome, a hereditary condition that increases the risk of colorectal cancer and other cancers.  Identifying people with Lynch syndrome could have substantial health benefits for them, their families, and communities.   Read More >

Posted on by Deb Duquette, MS, CGC & Sarah Mange, MPH- Michigan Department of Community Health; Cecelia Bellcross, PhD, MS- Emory University; Heather Hampel, MS, CGC- The Ohio State University; Kory Jasperson, MS, CGC- Huntsman Cancer Institute (Authors are all from the Lynch Syndrome Screening Network (LSSN) Founding Board of Directors)1 CommentTags , , , , ,
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