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Category: public health

Rare Diseases, Genomics and Public Health: An Expanding Intersection

Rare Diseases with DNA and an intersection

Rare Disease Day is celebrated on the last day of February each year. On that day, millions of patients and their families around the world share their stories in order to raise awareness about rare diseases and their impact. There are thousands of diseases that are individually rare but collectively common. In the United States, Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics; Rodolfo Valdez, epidemiologist, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

National Family History Day 2015: Thinking globally and acting locally

Multi Generation Family Celebrating Thanksgiving

Though you probably will not find greeting cards in stores celebrating this fact, Thanksgiving has been known as National Family History Day in the U.S. since 2004.  The Office of the U.S. Surgeon General and many federal, state and private partners have marked each year with events and announcements promoting the collection and use of family Read More >

Posted on by W. Gregory Feero, MD, PhD, Maine Dartmouth Family Medicine ResidencyLeave a commentTags , ,

Precision Medicine vs. Public Health: a False Dichotomy?

a crowd of people with two individuals circled in red and arrows pointed at them

The recent focus on precision medicine has attracted criticism from the public health community that firmly believes that health is determined by far more than health care, and that more sophisticated medical technologies may not adequately address important determinants of population health. There is no argument that a focus on the wider environmental, structural and Read More >

Posted on by Ron Zimmern, PHG Foundation and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a comment

Infectious Diseases: Precision Medicine for Public Health

a person with a respirator holding a disc wioptical mappingth

Until now, most medical treatments have been designed for the “average patient.” As a result of this “one-size-fits-all” approach, treatments can be very successful for some patients but not for others. Precision Medicine, on the other hand, is an innovative approach that takes into account individual differences in people’s genes, environments, and lifestyles. The Precision Read More >

Posted on by Marta Gwinn, Consultant, McKing Consulting Corp, Office of Public Health Genomics and Duncan MacCannell (NCEZID), Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags

Precision Medicine, Implementation Science and Public Health: How Do We Scale Up From 1 Million to 300 Million?

figure with magnifying glass looking at the US map

Planning for the 2015 Presidential Precision Medicine Initiative is in full swing. After the initial announcement in January 2015, several workshops were held to help in design and execution of the longitudinal cohort study of 1 million persons. The workshops covered important topics including a Building a Precision Medicine Research Cohort, Scientific Opportunities, Digital Health Data, Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags

Precision Public Health and Precision Medicine: Two Peas in a Pod

  The 2015 US Precision Medicine Initiative promises a new era of biomedical research and its application in health care. The initiative is enabled by rapid advances in biomedical sciences, including genomics and bioinformatics, as well as the progress in communication, information technologies and data science. Targeted cancer therapies are a near term goal for Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags ,

The Success of Precision Medicine Requires a Public Health Perspective

a magifying glass focusing on a figure in red with surrounding figures in blue

The announcement of a new major US Precision Medicine initiative comes more than a decade after the completion of the Human Genome Project, the ambitious project that culminated in sequencing all 3 billion base pairs of our genome. Continuous improvement in the quality of sequencing, dramatic reduction in price, and ongoing advances in multiple sectors Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags , ,

What is a “rare disease”? Polio eradication and primary immunodeficiency

a child getting the polio vaccine

During the last two decades, surveillance and strategic vaccination campaigns deployed by the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) have reduced polio incidence worldwide by more than 99 percent. Wild poliovirus (WPV) cases are now uncommon, with only 222 new cases reported worldwide so far in 2014.* Endemic transmission is now limited to areas of just Read More >

Posted on by Marta Gwinn, Consultant, McKing Consulting Corp, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionLeave a commentTags , , ,

Every Cause Needs a Champion: Jean Chabut as a Public Health Genomics Pioneer

Cham·pi·on noun \ˈcham-pē-ən\: someone who fights or speaks publicly in support of a person, belief, cause, etc.  Most public health programs can point to a key person or group who was instrumental in assuring not only the program’s successful introduction but also its long-term viability. Jean Chabut was that champion for public health genomics in Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury and Scott Bowen, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags

Public Health Approach to Big Data in the Age of Genomics: How Can we Separate Signal from Noise?

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The term Big Data is used to describe massive volumes of both structured and unstructured data that is so large and complex it is difficult to process and analyze. Examples of big data include the following: diagnostic medical imaging, DNA sequencing and other molecular technologies, environmental exposures, behavioral factors, financial transactions, geographic information & social Read More >

Posted on by Muin J Khoury, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags ,
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