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Calling on All of Us Public Health Scientists

The All of Us Research Program data provide a unique platform for public health scientists interested in using large-scale data to improve population health. Scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and elsewhere can now access and analyze data from the National Institutes of Health’s All of Us Research Program. In this post, Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Katherine Kolor, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Sheri Schully, Geoffrey Ginsburg, All of Us Research Program, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MarylandLeave a commentTags

Fulfilling the Promise of Epigenetics Requires More Studies in Diverse Populations

a diverse group of people and a double helix

Two recent articles, one in Nature Genetics and another in Genome Medicine, report the lack of racial and ethnic diversity in epigenetic research. This needs to change in order to fulfill the promise of epigenetics as a tool for health equity science. Health equity is the state where everyone has a fair and just ability Read More >

Posted on by Emily Drzymalla, Danielle Rasooly, Muin J. Khoury, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags

Precision Health Innovations in the Pandemic Era

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Two recent articles, one in Nature Medicine and another in Nature Biotechnology, highlight areas of health innovation that have been accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic. This blog post focuses on two precision health applications of technology—(1) genomics and (2) wearable devices and smartphone apps—that are likely to have a lasting impact beyond the pandemic. Increased Read More >

Posted on by Danielle Rasooly, Emily Drzymalla, and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags

Polygenic Risk Scores in Clinical Practice? Still Making the Case

a polygenic risk score curve with a double helix, a doctor pointing at a tablet with icons surround it, and a doctor talking to her patient

Two recent systematic reviews show the lack of data on clinical utility of polygenic risk scores and major challenges in implementation. The Promise of Polygenic Risk Scores in Population Health Many common diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and heart disease, result from the combination of genetic factors and physical and social environmental factors. Genome-wide association Read More >

Posted on by Jeffery Osei, Department of Epidemiology, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia; W. David Dotson, Marta Gwinn, Ridgely Fisk Green, Muin J. Khoury, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta GeorgiaLeave a commentTags ,