Category:

Are We Ready for Population Screening for Hereditary Hemochromatosis?

doctor visiting an elderly white man laying in a hospital man with

Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HH) is an inherited iron storage disorder in which the body builds up too much iron, damaging tissues and organs. In most people, HH is caused by two copies of a specific change (mutation) in the HFE gene which is most commonly found in people of European ancestry. In the United States, over Read More >

Posted on by Scott D. Grosse, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags

Artificial Intelligence, Public Trust, and Public Health

robot

As a data-driven agency, CDC has always had highly skilled statisticians and data scientists. As part of the Data Modernization Initiative, CDC is supporting strategic innovations in data science using artificial intelligence and machine learning (Ai/ML). Ai/ML is the practice of using mathematics with computers to learn from a wide range of data and make Read More >

Posted on by Carlos Siordia PhD, Office of Science Fellow and Muin J. Khoury MD, PhD, Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags

Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) versus the gonococcus: How CDC scientists are using WGS to beat antibiotic resistant gonorrhea

gonorrhea with a maginfying glass and DNA

Since 1995, when the first high-quality bacterial genome was completed using Sanger sequencing, the number of publicly available bacterial whole genome sequences (WGS) has grown exponentially, due to advances in next-generation (and now third generation) sequencing technology. The first bacteria sequenced using next-generation technologies included very few that cause sexually transmitted infections (STI) like Chlamydia trachomatis, Read More >

Posted on by Evonne Woodson and Brian Raphael, Laboratory Reference And Research Branch, Division of Sexually Transmitted Diseases Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags

The Road Ahead for Genomics Research: From Technology to Population Health Impact

a long road paved with DNA and a person looking at data and groups of people with one person under a magnifying glass

We often reflect on the promise, progress and challenges in the translation of genomics research into population health benefits. A recent commentary in Nature Reviews Genetics featured 12 key scientific challenges and opportunities in the field. Leading scientists took stock of the current state of science and discussed needed research in the next few years Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury and W. David Dotson, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a comment

Barriers and Facilitators to Recruiting Study Participants in Host Genomic Studies

a Manhattan plot wiht COVID-19 virus

Host genomic studies play an important part in understanding disease susceptibility, severity, and outcomes. These studies require a minimum number of participants to ensure statistical power. Participation barriers and facilitators must be considered in order to effectively recruit a suitable number and diversity of eligible participants. The COVID-19 host genetics initiative aims to explain the Read More >

Posted on by Madison Dixon, MPH Student, Emory University School of Medicine, and Ridgely Fisk Green, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags