Category: tier 1 guidelines

Trends in Tier 1 Genomic Applications 2013-2022

two figures looking at genomics trends with the text Tier 1 Applications

The CDC Tier 1 genomic applications database can help consumers, providers, health care organizations and public health programs accelerate the translation of genomic discoveries into improved population health.       Background Advances in genomics and precision medicine are proceeding at a rapid pace. Many genomic tests have reached clinical practice without clear indication as to whether their Read More >

Posted on by Mindy Clyne, W. David Dotson, Muin J. Khoury, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags ,

An Expanding List of Tier 1 Genomic Applications: Evidence-based Guidelines for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy and Public Health

a heart in a body with the text: Tier 1 Genomic Applications

The CDC Tier-Classified Guideline Database includes three Tier 1 guidelines on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). A 2014 guideline from the European Society of Cardiology, a 2017 guideline from the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and Heart Rhythm Society, and a 2020 guideline from the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology all recommend Read More >

Posted on by Michael A. Burke and Laurence S. Sperling, Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, W. David Dotson and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia1 CommentTags , ,

Tier 1 Guidelines on Family-Based Screening for Hereditary Hemochromatosis

Tier 1 Guidelines for Hereditary Hemochromatosis with a photo of a family with adult children

An important function in public health genomics is to identify evidence-based genomic applications that can save lives and prevent disease. In maintaining the PHGKB Tier Coded Guidelines database, we routinely look for Tier 1 applications of genomic testing strategies that have evidence-based guidance supporting implementation in specific clinical scenarios. We only consider recommendations that have Read More >

Posted on by W. David Dotson, Katherine Kolor, Muin J. Khoury, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Office of Science; and Scott D. Grosse, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental DisabilitiesLeave a commentTags ,