Category:

What’s the “value” of exome sequencing in children with neurodevelopmental disorders?

children in a classroom setting

This is a summary of a recent commentary in Genetics in Medicine by Grosse and Rasmussen. Exome sequencing (ES) is increasingly used as part of the genetics evaluation of neurodevelopmental disorders, and acute illness in newborns of suspected genetic origin, among others. However, barriers to the clinical use of ES include a widespread reluctance of insurers Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags , ,

Can a Healthy Lifestyle Reduce Your Risk of Dementia Regardless of Your Genes? – Part II

three set of figures depicting dementia

A new, long term cohort study suggests that healthy lifestyle is associated with a lower risk for dementia among people considered at lower and intermediate genetic risk but not for those considered at high genetic risk. “Globally, about 47 million people were living with dementia in 2015, and this number is projected to triple by Read More >

Posted on by Scott Bowen, Office of Public Health Genomics; Christopher Taylor, Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags ,

Can an Aspirin a Day Prevent Colorectal Cancer in People with Lynch Syndrome?

a hand holding a pill with several other pills on the table and a pill bottle and a body with an exposed colon

Encouraging news for group at much greater risk of CRC Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common cause of hereditary colorectal (colon) cancer (CRC). People with LS have a 50-70% risk of developing CRC in their lifetimes – far higher than the 4% risk within the general population where CRC is a leading cause of Read More >

Posted on by Scott Bowen, Office of Public Health Genomics; Nicole Dowling, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags