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Public Health Genomics: What’s Next?

a figure looking at a sign labeled Public Health Genomics with an arrow going to another sign labeled Precision Public Health and a double helix in the background

In the 1990’s, the excitement surrounding the Human Genome Project led the public health community to plan for the future role of genomics in health care and disease prevention. The field of public health genomics was launched to identify opportunities for the new science to impact health, inform public health programs and health care providers Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a comment

Let’s not get too excited about genome sequencing of healthy newborns. Here’s why!

Newborn screening (NBS) is the largest public health genetics program around the world.  Each year in the United States, thousands of babies are saved from lifelong disability and death by timely diagnosis and treatment. While most newborns are screened with biochemical tests that use drops of blood from a heel prick, new advances in genome Read More >

Posted on by Scott D. Grosse, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, Jeffrey R. Botkin, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia1 Comment