Category:

Precision Public Health and the COVID-19 Response

crowd connected with each other and a person in the middle magnified by a magnifiying glass surrounded by coronavirus

This blog is a summary of our recent paper in the Journal of the American Association. The public health response to COVID-19 requires a mix of general and targeted public health interventions, i.e., precision public health. Precision public health uses data from traditional and emerging sources to target interventions for populations by person, place, and Read More >

Posted on by Sonja A. Rasmussen, Departments of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Epidemiology, University of Florida College of Medicine and College of Public Health and Health Professions, Gainesville, Florida; Muin J. Khoury, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Carlos del Rio, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine and Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags

The Long Road to Population-based Genomic Screening

Since 2012, the CDC Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health (OGPPH) has identified three autosomal dominant conditions for which there exist evidence-based recommendations to prevent morbidity and mortality from either cancer or heart disease. Using our evidence-based framework, we have collectively labeled the following conditions as tier 1 genomic applications: 1) hereditary breast and Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia and Michael F. Murray, Clinical director, Center for Genomic Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut3 Comments

Beyond Tuberculosis: BCG Vaccine and Epigenetics

Tuberculosis (TB) infection is spread from person to person by respiratory droplets containing the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This infection mainly affects the lungs and may be fatal if left untreated. TB remains a leading cause of death worldwide. In 1921, a live attenuated vaccine, called the BCG vaccine, was introduced to protect against TB. The Read More >

Posted on by Emily Drzymalla, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta GA and Marta Gwinn, CFOL International, Atlanta GALeave a commentTags