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Pet Preparedness

Categories: General, Preparedness, Preparedness Month, Response

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Countless disasters have shown that pet owners can quickly become a vulnerable population in the face of a natural disaster or emergency. Should you stay at home with your pet? Should you take your pet with you? Where can you go with your pet? Should you leave your pet behind?

It is extremely important for the safety of pet owners and pets, to have a plan for caring for pets during a disaster.

A Prepared Caregiver

Categories: General, Natural Disasters, Preparedness, Preparedness Month, Public Health

Photo of older hands holding younger hands.

Back in 2007, Annie and her siblings began seeing early signs of Alzheimer’s Disease in their mother. Annie’s mother, Margaret was 79 years old and had begun to become confused and get lost while driving. Annie no longer felt she should be left alone to take care of herself. She decided it would be best for her mother to move into a small apartment addition she built onto her house.

Preparing an Older Generation

Categories: General, Preparedness, Preparedness Month, Public Health

Older person in a walker.

The generation that brought us the Internet, the civil rights movement, tie-dye and classic rock, is turning 65. It is estimated that nearly 7,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, and by the year 2030 most of the baby boomers will be entering their elderly years. As the largest generation prepares for retirement and senior living, we must consider how to prepare this population for disasters.

Emergency Planning for All Abilities

Categories: General, Natural Disasters, Preparedness, Preparedness Month, Public Health

Photo of a Push to Open button on a door for accessibility.

By Georgina Peacock

Nickole Cheron was stuck in her home for eight days after a rare winter storm buried Portland, Oregon, under more than a foot of snow in 2008. Fortunately for Nickole, whose muscles are too weak to support her body, she signed up for “Ready Now!,” an emergency preparedness training program developed through the CDC-supported Oregon Office of Disability and Health. Nickole said the training was empowering, and reinforced her ability to live independently with a disability.

Children Are Not Little Adults

Categories: General, Natural Disasters, Preparedness, Preparedness Month

Kids listening to a story

By Steven E. Krug, MD, FAAP

Imagine it. An earthquake shakes a California community, waking people whose homes have caught fire; responders must treat multiple children whose brief inhalation of smoke has rendered severe airway injuries. Or imagine a tornado rips through a town during the school day, and dozens of children need medical attention, but they’ve been separated from their identification and medical records. These are just two of the many disaster scenarios that pediatricians can help respond to—and also to plan for – so that the distinct medical needs of children are met.

3 Simple Steps to Protect Your Family

Categories: General, Natural Disasters, Preparedness, Public Health

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A brutal snowstorm strikes at mid-day. Roads grow increasingly congested as commuters across the city scramble to get home before conditions worsen. Ice begins to jam roads, and resulting accidents turn interstates into parking lots and neighborhood roads into skating rinks. Some parents grow increasingly desperate to reach their children as roads become impassable, leaving students stranded on buses and at school. Other parents pick up their children only to become stuck in their cars.

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