Category: National Center for Environmental Health

October is “National Protect Your Hearing Month.”

Are you the only one who's hearing that ringing?

Did you know that …? Repeated exposure to loud noise over the years can damage your hearing—long after exposure has stopped. Read More >

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Plain Language Past and Present, Part III: Award Winners

OCC safety

Plain Language Past and Present is a three-part blog series highlighting some of the interesting early efforts and events that championed the cause, long before 2010’s Plain Writing Act made it law. Part I examined John O’Hayre’s 1966 Gobbledygook Has Gotta Go, and underscored how overly formal, complex language can make writing wordy, pretentious, incomprehensible—or Read More >

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Fireworks Safety Month!

Fireworks Safety Month

The National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) at CDC supports #Fireworks Safety Month and recommends the use of hearing protection devices while participating in noisy activities this summer. Below are some examples of noisy activities Watching summer fireworks on the 4th of July Mowing the lawn Using a gas-powered lawn edger to manicure the lawn Read More >

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Using Data to Make Decisions and Inform Decision-Makers

Hotspot Map

Webster’s dictionary defines data as “factual information used as a basis for reasoning, discussion, or calculation.” This holds true at the La Crosse County Health Department (LCHD), an agency nestled between the Mississippi River and the bluffs of West Central Wisconsin. Here, data are a cornerstone to furthering policy and actions to improve the community’s Read More >

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Plain Language Past and Present, Part II

simplify

The Plain Writing Act, which requires government agencies to use plain writing in all documents, was passed in 2010—but the push to make writing clearer had been ongoing for decades. In this three-part blog series, Plain Language Past and Present, we highlight some of the interesting early efforts and events from the U.S. government website Read More >

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In Fond Memory of a Beloved and Respected Colleague, “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court.”

King Artur

Chris passed away on Sunday, May 3, 2020. In tribute to him, this blog is a reposting from September 19, 2016. “I often used to feel like ‘A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court’ — an out-of-place urban planner among physicians, epidemiologists, and nurses at CDC,” says Chris Kochtitzky, an Associate Director for Program Development Read More >

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Three Tips for Choosing the Right Hearing Protector

earplugs

We live in a noisy world. Some noises can damage our hearing, leading to hearing loss, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and difficulty communicating especially in background noise. Permanent noise-induced hearing damage is incurable. Read More >

Posted on by CAPT William J. Murphy, Ph.D., Christa L. Themann, MA, CCC-A,CAPT Chucri (Chuck) A. Kardous, MS, PE, and CAPT David C. Byrne, Ph.D., CCC-A.Leave a comment

International Noise Awareness Day – Wednesday, April 29, 2020

International Noise Awareness Day is an annual observance held on the last Wednesday of April. This global campaign aims to raise awareness of the impact of noise on the health and welfare of people. Read More >

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Plain Language Past and Present, Part I: The Legacy of “Gobbledygook”

simplicity

Ever been confused—or annoyed—by stuffy, stiff, hard-to-understand writing in a government document or statement? You’re not alone. For this reason, the Plain Writing Act of 2010 was passed, ordering U.S. government agencies to write in plain English. To support the law, the government created a website, https://www.plainlanguage.gov/law/, featuring guidelines, resources, and before-and-after examples. There’s also Read More >

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Legionnaires’ Disease and Water Management Programs

Water management programs are the primary mechanism for ensuring clean water to serve a building’s occupants.

Rob Cole squints against the desert wind as he gathers his equipment and crosses the hotel parking lot. Another person diagnosed with Legionnaires’ disease reported staying at this hotel. Rob, a Senior Environmental Health Specialist at Southern Nevada Health District, is investigating the case and preparing to begin a facility environmental investigation. Meanwhile in coastal Read More >

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