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Your Health – Your Environment Blog

A blog to increase public knowledge about environmental health by sharing our concerns and our work as well as information you can use in your daily life.

Health Impact Assessment in Transportation Planning

Categories: Emergency and Environmental Health Services, National Center for Environmental Health

Woman-Pushing-Stroller

It’s more than Safety

Southeast McLoughlin Boulevard (Oregon 99E), in the northwestern corner of Oregon’s Clackamas County, was designed primarily for motor vehicle traffic rather than pedestrian traffic to its auto-oriented businesses and shopping areas. McLoughlin Boulevard can be an unsafe and inhospitable environment for pedestrians and bicyclists. Not surprisingly, the local population has higher-than-county-average rates of four key transportation-related health outcomes: asthma, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity.

Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather

Categories: Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health

extremeheat

 

Getting too hot can make you sick. You can become ill from the heat if your body can’t compensate for it and properly cool you off.
Heat exposure can even kill you: it caused 7,233 heat-related deaths in the United States from 1999 to 2009.

Learn more about the steps you can take to prevent heat-related illnesses, injuries, and deaths during hot weather and protect yourself from extreme heat.

ALS Awareness 2015

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), National Center for Environmental Health

Monessa Tinsley-Crabb. Photo courtesy of Monessa Tinsley-Crabb.

Monessa Tinsley-Crabb. Photo courtesy of Monessa Tinsley-Crabb.

May is ALS Awareness Month. Far too little is known about ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease). Learn more about how the National ALS Registry is changing that

Who can forget the 2014 ALS Ice Bucket Challenge? In response to the challenge, participants dumped buckets of ice cold water on their heads and posted the videos on the internet. Then they, in turn, issued the challenge to others. The purpose of the challenge was to raise money for ALS. And it was successful. Since July 29, 2014, the ALS Association and other ALS organizations have received over $100 million in donations from that initiative.

Not since Lou Gehrig made his famous “Luckiest Man on Earth” speech in 1939 has so much public attention been focused on ALS. That was the year that the beloved New York Yankees baseball player was diagnosed with ALS. Since then ALS has also been known as “Lou Gehrig’s disease.”

ALS, a progressive neuromuscular disease, usually leads to death within 2–5 years of diagnosis. Seventy six years have passed since Lou Gehrig was diagnosed and still no one knows what causes ALS—and there is still no cure.

You Can Control Your Asthma

Categories: Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health

asthma_month_badge 2015

May is Asthma Awareness Month: Learn how to control your asthma.

Asthma is one of the most common lifelong chronic diseases. One in 14 Americans lives with asthma, a disease affecting the lungs, causing repeated episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing.

Learn more about asthma.

HCDI Influences Billion Dollar Spending

Categories: Emergency and Environmental Health Services, National Center for Environmental Health

Couple Biking in Neighborh

CDC’s Healthy Community Design Initiative (HCDI) is a key source of federal expertise to help states and communities integrate health considerations into transportation and community planning decisions. As part of a pilot project with Nashville, Tennessee, HCDI is influencing how billions of dollars of transportation spending will occur. Keep reading to learn more about how HCDI can impact the health of millions of Americans through this project.

A Snapshot of HCDI’s Influence

  • At the local and state levels, HCDI has funded or provided technical assistance to one-quarter of the more than 300 Health Impact Assessments conducted in the United States to date.
  • At the national level, HCDI works with partners on transportation and health research initiatives.
  • At the metropolitan level, HCDI has most recently partnered with the Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) to pilot methods that integrate public health into transportation planning.

Air Quality Awareness Week/Twitter Chat

Categories: Emergency and Environmental Health Services, National Center for Environmental Health

Air Quality Awareness Week 2015 Family Outdoors

What can you do to protect your health during Air Quality Awareness Week? Pay attention to the Air Quality Index (AQI). The AQI is a tool that tells you when high levels of air pollution are predicted and tells you how air pollution affects your health. Finding the AQI is easy. It’s on the Web, on many local TV weather forecasts, or you can sign up for free e-mail tools and apps. The AQI is easy to use. If the AQI predicts a “Code Orange” (unhealthy for sensitive groups) day don’t cancel your plans—use the AQI to help you plan a better time or place for them.

The AQI tells you about five major air pollutants in the U.S. that are regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency, including ozone and particle pollution. Ozone and particle pollution may harm the health of hundreds of thousands of Americans each year.

To learn more about how air quality affects your health join experts from CDC, EPA, NOAA, and the National Park Service Thursday, April 30, at 1:00 pm EDT for a TwitterChat about air quality, physical activity, and health.

Meet the Scientist Featuring Dr. Andreas Sjodin

Categories: Division of Laboratory Sciences, Meet the Scientist Blog Series, National Center for Environmental Health

DLS scientist Andreas Sjodin.  Photo courtesy of Andreas Sjodin.

DLS scientist Andreas Sjodin. Photo courtesy of Andreas Sjodin.

The NCEH/ATSDR “Meet the Scientist” series provides insight into the work of NCEH/ATSDR scientists. The series also aims to give you a sense of the talented people who are working to keep you safe and secure from things in the environment that threaten our nation’s health.

For three decades, scientists at CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) have been keeping America safe from hazards in our environment. For example, scientists at ATSDR have worked in more than 900 communities across the nation to assess and explain the health risks involved in exposures to hazardous substances and educate community members so they can keep their families safe.

Earth Day and Environmental Justice: Connected and Working Together Side-By-Side

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health

environmental justice earth day 2015

Sparks for Environmental Movement

On April 22nd, the world will celebrate the 45th anniversary of Earth Day. Conceived by former U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson, Earth Day was established to focus on creating a healthier environment by protecting our planet and its resources. Perhaps, Earth Day set the tone for environmental protection, education, and advocacy. Senator Nelson said the idea of Earth Day evolved over a period of seven years starting in 1962. This was a time when the fight for civil rights characterized activism against injustice, brutality, and dehumanization, and a time when Woodstock represented a peace and love generation.

HCDI Influences Billion Dollar Spending

Categories: Emergency and Environmental Health Services, National Center for Environmental Health

Couple Biking in Neighborh

CDC’s Healthy Community Design Initiative (HCDI) is a key source of federal expertise to help states and communities integrate health considerations into transportation and community planning decisions. As part of a pilot project with Nashville, Tennessee, HCDI is influencing how billions of dollars of transportation spending will occur. Keep reading to learn more about how HCDI can impact the health of millions of Americans through this project.

A Snapshot of HCDI’s Influence

  • At the local and state levels, HCDI has funded or provided technical assistance to one-quarter of the more than 300 Health Impact Assessments conducted in the United States to date.
  • At the national level, HCDI works with partners on transportation and health research initiatives.
  • At the metropolitan level, HCDI has most recently partnered with the Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) to pilot methods that integrate public health into transportation planning.

Are You a Public Health Nerd?

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR)

public health nerd

Do you like science and care about saving lives? If so, you might just be a public health nerd!

In 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched the Public Health Nerd (#PHNerd) online campaign to mobilize people who are passionate about public health and its role in creating and sustaining a healthy, stable society. The campaign promotes awareness about CDC’s work to protect the nation’s health and safety. It also hopes to encourage learning and increase knowledge about public health.

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