Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Your Health – Your Environment Blog

A blog to increase public knowledge about environmental health by sharing our concerns and our work as well as information you can use in your daily life.

Share
Compartir

You’re as Young as You Feel

Categories: Emergency and Environmental Health Services, National Center for Environmental Health

1950s-TV

Do you remember your first black and white television? Did you ever wonder how crawling under your desk could protect you from an atomic bomb? Did you watch the Beatles when they made their first American appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show?

If you can answer yes to these questions, you are very likely a “baby boomer,” born after World War II from 1946 through 1964.By 1965, baby boomers made up over 40% of the U.S. population.

World Trade Center Health Registry

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR)

When buildings collapsed at the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 in New York, our nation and the world at large were devastated. Nearly 2,800 people died, including 343 firefighters, 23 police officers, 37 Port Authority police officers, and more than 2,200 civilians.

Along with the death and devastation immediately wrought by the attacks, there was concern from the outset that the collapse of the Twin Towers could have consequences for the health of

  • responders,
  • clean-up workers,
  • residents,
  • office workers,
  • school children, and
  • others in the area.

A Model Aquatic Health Code for Healthy Pools

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Emergency and Environmental Health Services, Toxic Substances

Child on slide. Photo from Creatas Images.

Child on slide. Photo from Creatas Images.

Since 1978, the number of illness outbreaks associated with recreational water has increased significantly. Many of these illnesses can be prevented by proper maintenance, water treatment, and updated disease prevention practices. At the request of local and state health departments, and the aquatics industry, CDC led a national effort to develop the Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC).

The MAHC is a free resource based on science and best practices.

Who Is Most at Risk in Disasters?

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Emergency Preparedness, International Environmental Health, National Center for Environmental Health, Severe Weather

Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Katrina

Imagine that one of the steps to your front porch is broken. Do you wait until someone falls and gets hurt to repair it, or do you fix it before that happens? How about smoke alarms? Do you wait until you have a fire in your home before you install one, or do you install one because you want to prevent a fire?

Of course, the logical choice is to remove safety hazards before injuries happen, or to install devices to warn your family of danger before that danger occurs. If eliminating hazards is effective in keeping homes safe, wouldn’t the same principle apply to natural and man-made disasters?

Voices from the Field: Hydrogen Sulfide in Detroit

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Toxic Substances, Voices from the Field

Mark Jason

Mark Johnson is ATSDR’s Region 5 director in Chicago, Illinois. Read about how he helped stop harmful hydrogen sulfide exposures in Detroit, Michigan.

Air Samples Catch Harmful Levels of Hydrogen Sulfide at the Detroit Water Treatment Plant

Hydrogen sulfide is a flammable, colorless gas that smells like rotten eggs. Exposure to hydrogen sulfide is a potential health concern, even for short periods. In 2012, the EPA-Region 5 Air Enforcement program notified ATSDR that air samples near the Detroit Wastewater Treatment Plant showed readings as high as 12,000 parts per billion (ppb). Since the Acute Minimal Risk Level for hydrogen sulfide was 70 ppb, Johnson knew something had to be done.

New ATSDR Brownfield and Land Reuse Site Tools Now Available

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Health Investigations, Toxic Substances

Land-Reuse-Before-and-After

Example of land reuse, photo courtesy of ATSDR.

NCEH/ATSDR works to keep you safe and secure from things in the environment that threaten the public’s health. Read on to learn more about how the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) protects communities from harmful exposures at hazardous waste sites.

Is there a vacant lot in your neighborhood that’s an eyesore? Do you wonder what the site was before? Could it have been a gas station or dry cleaner? Are there harmful contaminants that you or others in your community could be exposed to? Finding out the answers to these questions is now much easier!

ATSDR Introduces New Resources

In its ongoing effort to protect people from potentially harmful exposures at hazardous waste sites, ATSDR offers two free tools: the ATSDR Dose Calculator and ATSDR Brownfields and Land Reuse Site Tool.

With these new resources, you can quickly see the risks of chemical exposures at potentially hazardous sites. “ATSDR developed these tools after a survey of local health departments

GRASP Propels Polio Vaccination by Locating Remote Nigerian Villages

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), International Environmental Health, National Center for Environmental Health

GRASP Vaccines

Thanks to nationwide immunization, by 1979 the United States had effectively eliminated polio, a crippling and sometimes fatal disease. However, in much of the world, polio continued to spread. Polio is incurable and contagious, so widespread and thorough vaccination is the only way to eradicate it completely.

In 1988, national governments organized by the World Health Organization (WHO) and other health organizations formed the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) to eliminate polio worldwide by providing access to vaccinations. By 2006, polio had been contained to only four nations.

Meet the Scientist – Jennifer Lyke

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Health Investigations, Meet the Scientist Blog Series

The NCEH/ATSDR “Meet the Scientist” series provides insight into the work the talented people who are working to keep you safe and secure from things in the environment that threaten our nation’s health

ATSDR Region Six Representative, Jennifer Lyke. Photo courtesy of Jennifer Lyke.

ATSDR Region Six Representative, Jennifer Lyke. Photo courtesy of Jennifer Lyke.

For three decades, scientists at CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) have kept America safe from hazards in the environment. For example, scientists at ATSDR have worked in more than 900 communities across the nation to assess and explain the health risks involved in exposures to hazardous substances and to educate communities so they can keep families safe. Read on to learn more about ATSDR Region Six Representative Jennifer Lyke. She has received multiple awards for her regional work, including an ATSDR Leadership in Public Health award in 2005 and an EPA National Achievement Award (Bronze medal) in 2009.

Meet the Scientist: Xiaoyun “Sherry” Ye

Categories: Meet the Scientist Blog Series, National Center for Environmental Health, Toxic Substances

DLS Scientist, Xiaoyun “Sherry” Ye.  Photo courtesy of Sherry Ye.

DLS Scientist, Xiaoyun “Sherry” Ye. Photo courtesy of Sherry Ye.

The NCEH/ATSDR “Meet the Scientist” series provides insight into the work of NCEH/ATSDR scientists. The series also aims to give you a sense of the talented people who are working to keep you safe and secure from things in the environment that threaten our nation’s health.

Meet Xiaoyun “Sherry” Ye, winner of NCEH/ATSDR Excellence in Applied Research and Excellence in Public Health Protection awards. Sherry’s an NCEH/ATSDR Division of Laboratory Sciences (DLS) scientist who helps keep you and your family safe from BPAs.

When the Lights Go Out

Categories: Emergency Preparedness, Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health, Severe Weather

Protect yourself from CO poisoning during summer storms

lightning

Summer weather brings with it the threat of thunderstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes. Heavy rain, lightning and high winds can knock out electric power for a few minutes to several days.

When power outages occur after severe weather (such as hurricanes or tornadoes), using alternative sources of power can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up in a home and poison the people and animals inside.

Older Posts

Pages in this Blog
  1. [1]
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. >>
 
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO
A-Z Index
  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #