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Your Health – Your Environment Blog

A blog to increase public knowledge about environmental health by sharing our concerns and our work as well as information you can use in your daily life.

Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather

Categories: National Center for Environmental Health, Severe Weather

extremeheat

Now is the time to prepare for the high temperatures that kill hundreds of people every year. Extreme heat caused 7,415 heat-related deaths in the United States from 1999 to 2010. Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat.

Stay Safe During Lightning

Categories: National Center for Environmental Health, Severe Weather

lightning

The consequences of lightning strikes are serious. Lightning is one of the leading causes of weather-related fatalities. During 2003–2012, lightning caused an average of 35 deaths per year in the United States. Read more about Lightning strikes and how to stay safe.

 

A Model Aquatic Health Code for Healthy Pools

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Emergency and Environmental Health Services, Toxic Substances

Child on slide. Photo from Creatas Images.

Child on slide. Photo from Creatas Images.

Since 1978, the number of illness outbreaks associated with recreational water has increased significantly. Many of these illnesses can be prevented by proper maintenance, water treatment, and updated disease prevention practices. At the request of local and state health departments, and the aquatics industry, CDC led a national effort to develop the Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC).

The MAHC is a free resource based on science and best practices.

Voices from the Field featuring Candis Hunter

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Division of Toxicology and Human Health Sciences, Voices from the Field

LCDR Candis M. Hunter. Photo courtesy of LCDR Candis Hunter.

LCDR Candis M. Hunter. Photo courtesy of LCDR Candis Hunter.

In this NCEH/ATSDR blog series titled “Voices from the Field,” readers gain first-hand accounts of NCEH/ATSDR staff experiences working in communities to protect public health. This post features LCDR Candis M. Hunter, a project officer and environmental epidemiologist in the Division of Toxicology and Human Health Sciences, Environmental Epidemiology Branch. Read on to learn more about her personal experience working with ATSDR’s Navajo Birth Cohort Study (NBCS).

How much do you know about Environmental Public Health?

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Biomonitoring, Division of Laboratory Sciences, Division of Toxicology and Human Health Sciences, Emergency and Environmental Health Services, National Center for Environmental Health

Environmental_PH

Can your environment make you sick? What about extreme heat or cold, polluted water, truck exhaust, pesticides, tobacco, or Salmonella? When you think about it, harmful substances anywhere in your environment might affect your health. So what exactly is your environment?

Your environment is everything around you — the air you breathe, the water you drink, the community you live in, the places where your food is grown or prepared, your workplace, and your home. When your environment is safe and healthy, you are more likely to stay healthy. But hazardous substances or dangerous events in your environment can cause harmful health effects. Environmental public health is about protecting populations—families, communities, cities, states, nations and tribes—from environmental threats to their health, safety, and well-being.

Voices from the Field: Uranium in the Navajo Nation

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Health Investigations

Paul Charp

Paul Charp is a senior health physicist with ATSDR’s Division of Community Health Investigations (DCHI). DCHI works to reduce person’s exposures to toxic substances. A health physicist is an individual who has specific training in radiation safety protecting people and their environment from potential radiation hazards. The typical health physicist has an understanding of many scientific disciplines including physics, biological sciences, engineering, and chemistry.

Health Impact Assessment in Transportation Planning

Categories: Emergency and Environmental Health Services, National Center for Environmental Health

Woman-Pushing-Stroller

It’s more than Safety

Southeast McLoughlin Boulevard (Oregon 99E), in the northwestern corner of Oregon’s Clackamas County, was designed primarily for motor vehicle traffic rather than pedestrian traffic to its auto-oriented businesses and shopping areas. McLoughlin Boulevard can be an unsafe and inhospitable environment for pedestrians and bicyclists. Not surprisingly, the local population has higher-than-county-average rates of four key transportation-related health outcomes: asthma, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity.

Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather

Categories: Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health

extremeheat

 

Getting too hot can make you sick. You can become ill from the heat if your body can’t compensate for it and properly cool you off.
Heat exposure can even kill you: it caused 7,233 heat-related deaths in the United States from 1999 to 2009.

Learn more about the steps you can take to prevent heat-related illnesses, injuries, and deaths during hot weather and protect yourself from extreme heat.

ALS Awareness 2015

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), National Center for Environmental Health

Monessa Tinsley-Crabb. Photo courtesy of Monessa Tinsley-Crabb.

Monessa Tinsley-Crabb. Photo courtesy of Monessa Tinsley-Crabb.

May is ALS Awareness Month. Far too little is known about ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease). Learn more about how the National ALS Registry is changing that

Who can forget the 2014 ALS Ice Bucket Challenge? In response to the challenge, participants dumped buckets of ice cold water on their heads and posted the videos on the internet. Then they, in turn, issued the challenge to others. The purpose of the challenge was to raise money for ALS. And it was successful. Since July 29, 2014, the ALS Association and other ALS organizations have received over $100 million in donations from that initiative.

Not since Lou Gehrig made his famous “Luckiest Man on Earth” speech in 1939 has so much public attention been focused on ALS. That was the year that the beloved New York Yankees baseball player was diagnosed with ALS. Since then ALS has also been known as “Lou Gehrig’s disease.”

ALS, a progressive neuromuscular disease, usually leads to death within 2–5 years of diagnosis. Seventy six years have passed since Lou Gehrig was diagnosed and still no one knows what causes ALS—and there is still no cure.

You Can Control Your Asthma

Categories: Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health

asthma_month_badge 2015

May is Asthma Awareness Month: Learn how to control your asthma.

Asthma is one of the most common lifelong chronic diseases. One in 14 Americans lives with asthma, a disease affecting the lungs, causing repeated episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing.

Learn more about asthma.

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