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Your Health – Your Environment Blog

A blog to increase public knowledge about environmental health by sharing our concerns and our work as well as information you can use in your daily life.

Drought and Health

Categories: Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services, National Center for Environmental Health, Severe Weather

burned corn

When rainfall is lower than average for an extended period of time, drought can occur. Some of the numerous and far-reaching health implications of drought include reduced quantity and quality of drinking water, diminished air quality, and increases in illness and disease.

Cycles of drought have affected North America for the last 10,000 years. Droughts can last from a single season to many decades and can affect from a few hundred to millions of square miles. Drought can affect areas or communities differently depending on several additional variables. These variables include:

Tracking Extreme Heat

Categories: Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services, National Center for Environmental Health, Severe Weather

heat

CDC’s Environmental Public Health Tracking Network is a dynamic surveillance system that provides information and data about environmental hazards and the health problems that may be related to them.

It presents what we know about where environmental hazards exist, where exposures happen, and how targeted action can protect health, reduce illness, and save lives.

The Tracking Network is a unique resource that brings together environmental and health information that cannot be found, or is hard to find, anywhere else.

Meet the Scientist – Dr. Lourdes (Luly) Rosales-Guevara

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Meet the Scientist Blog Series

What do scientists and mystery buffs have in common? The challenge of a good investigation.

ATSDR scientist Lourdes (Luly) Rosales-Guevara. Photo courtesy of Dr. Rosales-Guevara.

ATSDR scientist Lourdes (Luly) Rosales-Guevara. Photo courtesy of Dr. Rosales-Guevara.

The journey to public health.

Originally from Cuba, Dr. Lourdes (Luly) Rosales-Guevara’s family was granted political asylum in the United States after they left Cuba on April 6, 1968. She was 16 years old. Dr. Rosales-Guevara was educated in Zaragoza, Spain, where she also attended Medical School, graduating in 1980 with a degree in Medicine and Surgery. After completing her medical education, she successfully completed the ECFMG (Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates) 3-day examination, thus allowing her to seek a Residency Program in Pediatrics.

Luly, as she prefers to be called, did an internship in Morristown Memorial Hospital (affiliated with Columbia University Medical Center in New York) and a pediatric residency in St. Joseph’s Regional Medical Center, in Paterson, New Jersey (affiliated with University Hospital, Newark, New Jersey). She holds medical licenses in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut.

Get the Picture? NCEH Wins Awards for Clear Communication

Categories: Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health

Have you ever tried to follow written instructions for putting together a piece of furniture or setting up new equipment? If you have, you probably know how frustrating those instructions can be. Without diagrams, following them can be nearly impossible.

What about following instructions on a government website? How has that worked out for you? Well, understanding government language should be getting easier for all of us, thanks to the Plain Writing Act of 2010.

Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health, Toxic Substances

trees

CO is found in fumes produced by portable generators, stoves, lanterns, and gas ranges, or by burning charcoal and wood. CO from these sources can build up in enclosed or partially enclosed spaces. People and animals in these spaces can be poisoned and can die from breathing CO.

Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather

Categories: National Center for Environmental Health, Severe Weather

extremeheat

Now is the time to prepare for the high temperatures that kill hundreds of people every year. Extreme heat caused 7,415 heat-related deaths in the United States from 1999 to 2010. Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat.

Stay Safe During Lightning

Categories: National Center for Environmental Health, Severe Weather

lightning

The consequences of lightning strikes are serious. Lightning is one of the leading causes of weather-related fatalities. During 2003–2012, lightning caused an average of 35 deaths per year in the United States. Read more about Lightning strikes and how to stay safe.

 

A Model Aquatic Health Code for Healthy Pools

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services, Toxic Substances

Child on slide. Photo from Creatas Images.

Child on slide. Photo from Creatas Images.

Since 1978, the number of illness outbreaks associated with recreational water has increased significantly. Many of these illnesses can be prevented by proper maintenance, water treatment, and updated disease prevention practices. At the request of local and state health departments, and the aquatics industry, CDC led a national effort to develop the Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC).

The MAHC is a free resource based on science and best practices.

Voices from the Field featuring Candis Hunter

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Division of Toxicology and Human Health Sciences, Sharing Our Stories, Voices from the Field

LCDR Candis M. Hunter. Photo courtesy of LCDR Candis Hunter.

LCDR Candis M. Hunter. Photo courtesy of LCDR Candis Hunter.

In this NCEH/ATSDR blog series titled “Voices from the Field,” readers gain first-hand accounts of NCEH/ATSDR staff experiences working in communities to protect public health. This post features LCDR Candis M. Hunter, a project officer and environmental epidemiologist in the Division of Toxicology and Human Health Sciences, Environmental Epidemiology Branch. Read on to learn more about her personal experience working with ATSDR’s Navajo Birth Cohort Study (NBCS).

How much do you know about Environmental Public Health?

Categories: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Biomonitoring, Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services, Division of Laboratory Sciences, Division of Toxicology and Human Health Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health

Environmental_PH

Can your environment make you sick? What about extreme heat or cold, polluted water, truck exhaust, pesticides, tobacco, or Salmonella? When you think about it, harmful substances anywhere in your environment might affect your health. So what exactly is your environment?

Your environment is everything around you — the air you breathe, the water you drink, the community you live in, the places where your food is grown or prepared, your workplace, and your home. When your environment is safe and healthy, you are more likely to stay healthy. But hazardous substances or dangerous events in your environment can cause harmful health effects. Environmental public health is about protecting populations—families, communities, cities, states, nations and tribes—from environmental threats to their health, safety, and well-being.

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