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Category: Zika

Battling Biting Mosquitoes and Jumping Genes in 2016

Last year, an expert from the CDC National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases (NCEZID) found himself in an unlikely position: guest starring on a popular Navajo language radio program to field questions about hantavirus infection. Hantavirus is caused by contact with mouse droppings and can sometimes be fatal. This is just one example of Read More >

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10 Ways CDC Gets Ready For Emergencies

One of the best parts of my job is the opportunity to learn from a wide range of experiences. We have an obligation to not only respond to emergencies today, but to prepare for tomorrow by learning from the past. Our work extends to households affected by disease, communities ravaged by disasters, and U.S. territories Read More >

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Looking Back: 5 Big Lessons from 2016

Looking through the rearview mirror while driving in the planes

CDC is always there – before, during, and after emergencies – and 2016 was no exception. Through it all, we’ve brought you the best and latest science-based information on being prepared and staying safe. Here’s a look back at 5 big lessons from a very eventful year. Follow the links to discover the full stories! Read More >

Posted on by Dr. Stephen Redd, Director, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response2 CommentsTags , , , , , , , ,

Recognizing the Vital Work of Our Nation’s Public Servants

Greg Burel receiving SAMMIE award.

In April 2015, an Ohio doctor made an urgent call to CDC concerning a possible life-threatening botulism outbreak that posed a risk to as many as 50 people who had attended a church potluck dinner. Within hours, CDC, the Ohio Department of Health, and a local hospital had determined that botulism antitoxin was needed to Read More >

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West Nile to Zika: How One Virus Helped New York City Prepare for Another

New York City larviciding helicopter

No one told the Aedes mosquito that New York is the city that never sleeps. The type of mosquito that can spread Zika virus (Zika) is most active during the early morning, day, and early evening. But New York is teeming with people during most of this time, meaning that our scientists had to find Read More >

Posted on by Mario Merlino, Assistant Commissioner, Pest Control and Veterinary Services, New York City Department of Health and Mental HygieneLeave a commentTags , , , , ,

The Power of Preparedness

If there were one thing I’d wish for, it would be the ability to predict when and where the next infectious disease outbreak would occur and stop it before it starts. I can’t do that. And neither can anyone else. At this moment, in addition to combating Zika in the United States and polio in Read More >

Posted on by Dr. Stephen Redd, Director, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response1 CommentTags , , , , ,
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