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CDC’s Public Health Grand Rounds Presents “Promoting Hearing Health across the Lifespan”

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Public Health Grand Rounds

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has announced the next session of Public Health Grand Rounds, “Promoting Hearing Health across the Lifespan” which will be held on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. (ET).

Public Health Grand Round sessions are open to the public:

A live webcast will be available on CDC’s website. The link will be live five minutes before the presentation. View Public Health Grand Round sessions on CDC’s archive page at your convenience. Sessions are archived 3-4 days after each presentation.

Hearing loss is the third most commonly reported chronic health condition in the US and untreated can lead to anxiety, depression, loneliness, and stress. The World Health Organization estimates that over 5% of the world’s population – 360 million people – has disabling hearing loss. In addition to hearing loss, chronic noise exposure has been associated with heart disease, increased blood pressure, and numerous other adverse health effects. Given its associated implications on communication, education, and employment, hearing loss places a significant burden on society. Preventive initiatives, hearing conservation programs, and habilitation/rehabilitation efforts need to be tailored to specific populations, stages of life, and hearing risk factors. Innovative hearing health programs should be developed, evaluated, and implemented. This Public Health Grand Rounds will discuss factors that affect hearing health and initiatives to improve individual and societal outcomes regarding hearing.

Join CDC for this session of Public Health Grand Rounds as experts discuss strategies on the reduction of noise induced hearing loss among children, teens and adults. The experts will describe a public health campaign to reduce the incidence and prevalence of noise induced hearing loss among school-aged children, the use of hearing protection devices and, WHO’s work on the prevention of deafness and hearing loss abroad.

  • Dr. Shelly Chadha, an otolaryngologist directing the World Health Organization’s work on prevention of deafness and hearing loss including advocacy for prioritization of hearing care; technical support to countries for development of hearing care strategies and development of tools and guidance.
  • Dr. Deanna Meinke, a researcher and professor of audiology and speech-language sciences at the University of Northern Colorado and Co-Director of Dangerous Decibels, a public health campaign designed to reduce the incidence and prevalence of noise induced hearing loss by changing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of school-aged children.
  • John Eichwald, an audiologist in the Office of Science of CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health working on reduction of noise induced hearing loss among children, teens and adults resulting from loud sound exposure at home and in the community.
  • Dr. William Murphy, a Captain in the U.S. Public Health Service and co-leader of the Hearing Loss Prevention Team at CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health specializing in measurement and rating of hearing protection devices, fit testing of hearing protection devices and in the assessment of impulse noise and its effects on hearing.

For questions about this Grand Rounds topic:

Feel free to e-mail your questions before or during the session.

For more information on Hearing Loss visit https://www.cdc.gov/hearingloss/default.html

Tweet this: “Be sure to watch the next #CDCGrandRounds on #HearingLoss – live on Facebook 6/22 1PM ET. http://bit.ly/2stLbMp

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