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Still Lost in Transition? A Fresh Look at Life After Cancer

Woman wearing a headscarf gestures while discussing chemotherapy treatment with women in a breast cancer support group.

Every person with cancer looks forward to the day when they become a cancer survivor. But the transition from active cancer treatment to after-treatment care can be confusing—for both survivors and their health care providers. In a recently published paper, three CDC scientists took a fresh look at the challenges faced by new cancer survivors as they learn to adapt to life after a cancer diagnosis.  Read More >

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Helping Make Sure Families Won’t Have to Say Goodbye Because of Cancer

Reda Wilson has worked in cancer prevention and control more than 30 years, including 18 years at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Division of Cancer Prevention and Control. In celebration of the 30th anniversary of CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR), Reda tells us about her experiences building and expanding cancer registries including NPCR, and why the program is so important to her. Read More >

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Cancer Doesn’t Wait and Neither Should You

Photo or Dr. Lisa Richardson, Director, CDC Division of Cancer Prevention and Control

Dr. Lisa Richardson talks with cancer survivor April Donaldson about the importance of screening during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Read More >

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New Updates to the US Cancer Statistics Data Visualizations Tool

Man working on a desktop computer

The US Cancer Statistics Data Visualizations tool provides quick access to data for researchers, clinicians, policy makers, and public health professionals. New data have been added, and the tool’s layout has been redesigned to improve navigation, data-sharing options, and visual displays. Read More >

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The Cost of Cancer

The total patient economic burden associated with cancer care in 2019 was $21.09 billion. with dollar sign symbol

A cancer diagnosis can affect life in many ways, both for people with cancer and for their families. In addition to the many physical and emotional challenges, many people worry about how they will pay for treatment or what will happen if they aren’t able to work or need to change how they work. Recognizing these costs for individuals and for our society is an important part of understanding the true burden of cancer. Read More >

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