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Selected Category: State & Local Success

On the Go in an Emergency: Stephanie’s Hurricane Sandy Story

Categories: Emergency Preparedness & Response, State & Local Success

Image of Stephanine

Stephanie

CDC works around-the-clock to save lives and protect people; however, there are steps you can take to prepare for emergencies, especially those caused by natural disasters such as hurricanes. Now that the 2013 hurricane season is upon us, we wanted to share with you Stephanie’s Hurricane Sandy story.  

When disaster strikes, you might be at home or at a number of other places. This can make it difficult for your family to follow an emergency plan. Packing emergency supplies and information in an emergency kit can make it easier to prepare and respond during a disaster, especially if you have a child with special health care needs.

Lauren was with her daughter, Stephanie, in the intensive care unit at a local hospital when Hurricane Sandy hit. Stephanie has autism and recently underwent a kidney transplant, which requires her to have refrigerated medicine and to be in a climate-controlled environment at all times. When they returned home, there was no electricity or heat, and the family soon realized that they would need a generator to help care for Stephanie’s medical needs. “We first thought of a generator before her kidney transplant, but it took being without electricity to realize we really needed it,” says Lauren. These are familiar challenges faced by many families during storms and other emergencies.

CDC’s Public Health Associate Program: A Win for Young People, A Win for America’s Health Security

Categories: Emergency Preparedness & Response, Public Health Partners, State & Local Success, U.S. Disease Outbreaks

Laura Cianciolo and Cleopatra Adedeji  of CDC's Public Health Associate Program

Left to Right: Laura Cianciolo and Cleopatra Adedeji  of CDC’s Public Health Associate Program

A tuberculosis (TB) case manager. A quarantine public health officer. A district liaison for a state’s Strategic National Stockpile. Not typical job opportunities for recent college graduates, but three of many frontline public health work experiences young people have had across the country thanks to CDC’s Public Health Associate Program. With National Public Health Week 2013 upon us (April 1-7), CDC is working with its partners in state, tribal, local, and territorial public health departments to highlight the need for and value of developing America’s modern public health workforce to continue to save lives and protect people.

Bringing Public Health to Life: Winners of CDC’s 9th Annual Public Health in Action Photo Contest

Categories: Disease Detectives, Emergency Preparedness & Response, Global Health Threats, Innovative Labs, Public Health Partners, State & Local Success, U.S. Disease Outbreaks

1. The Hajj and Disease Surveillance by John P. Abellera: This photo was taken in Mina, Saudi Arabia on the first day of the annual Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca. The Hajj attracts more than 3 million Muslims from over 140 countries and poses serious disease outbreak concerns. The CDC Office of Global Health was invited by the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to provide epidemiologic and technical assistance to KSA’s Ministry of Health in the use of mobile technology and data analysis to enhance disease surveillance.

In anticipation of National Public Health Week (April 1-7, 2013), CDC unveiled the winners of its Ninth Annual Public Health in Action Photo Contest. The 11 winners capture how CDC works around-the-clock to protect people at home and abroad from health and safety threats.  Take a minute to look at the winning photos, read their captions, and see public health come to life. 

CDC Looks Ahead: 13 Public Health Issues in 2013

Categories: Disease Detectives, Emergency Preparedness & Response, Global Health Threats, Innovative Labs, Public Health Partners, State & Local Success, U.S. Disease Outbreaks

As America’s health protection agency, CDC works around-the-clock to save lives and protect people from health threats, whether they start at home or abroad, are chronic or acute, are curable or preventable, or are the result of human error or deliberate attack.

Here’s a look at 13 public health issues CDC is working on for you in 2013:

1. Healthcare-Associated Infections: Protecting Patients, Saving Lives

More than 1 million Americans get a healthcare-associated infection during the course of their medical care, which accounts for billions of dollars in excess healthcare costs. CDC is working toward the elimination of healthcare-associated infections across all settings. CDC continues to target untreatable drug resistant infections that threaten patient safety and, in early 2013, will be releasing updated national and state numbers on healthcare-associated infections prevention in U.S. hospitals. (Above photo: CDC scientist Alicia Shams demonstrating K. pneumoniae growth on a MacConkey agar plate.)

13 Ways CDC Has Been There for America and the World in 2012

Categories: Disease Detectives, Emergency Preparedness & Response, Global Health Threats, Innovative Labs, Public Health Partners, State & Local Success, U.S. Disease Outbreaks

Photo of Hurricane Sandy courtesy of NASA

CDC has America’s back. We work around-the-clock to protect Americans from health and safety threats, both foreign and domestic. We also help people lead longer, healthier, more productive lives by preventing heart attacks, cancer, stroke, diabetes, and other leading causes of death.

Here’s a list of 13 ways CDC has been there for America and the world in 2012:

1. Multistate Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

CDC, in collaboration with state and local health departments and the Food and Drug Administration, is investigating a multistate outbreak of fungal meningitis and other infections among patients who received contaminated preservative-free MPA steroid injections from New England Compounding Center. Several patients suffered strokes that are believed to have resulted from their infections. The investigation also includes other infections from injections in a peripheral joint, such as a knee, shoulder, or ankle. Read the CDC Works for You 24/7 blog post, The Critical Role of State Health Depts. in the U.S. Fungal Meningitis Outbreak: 4 Key Efforts.

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