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Category: Work Schedules

NIOSH Research on Work Schedules and Work-related Sleep Loss

Yesterday, in honor of National Sleep Awareness Week, we blogged about sleep and work and the risks to workers, employers, and the public when workers’ hours and shifts do not allow for adequate sleep.   This blog provides a brief overview of some of the work that NIOSH intramural scientists are carrying out to better understand Read More >

Posted on by Claire Caruso, PhD, RN; Luenda Charles, PhD; Tina Lawson, PhD; Akinori Nakata, PhD; Karl Sieber, PhD; Sudha Pandalai, MD, PhD; and Ted Hitchcock, PhD27 Comments

Sleep and Work

Sleep is a vital biological function and many Americans don’t get enough. To coincide with National Sleep Awareness Week, the new NIOSH blog post: Sleep and Work summarizes the risks to workers, employers and the public when long hours and irregular shifts required by many jobs do not allow workers to get adequate sleep. Read More >

Posted on by Claire Caruso, PhD, RN, and Roger R Rosa, PhD70 Comments

Police and Stress

By the nature of their jobs, many police officers face tremendous stress on a daily basis. NIOSH and colleagues at the University at Buffalo are studying the effects of policing and stress on adverse metabolic and early stage cardiovascular outcomes.  Read More >

Posted on by Tara A. Hartley, MPA, MPH, Cecil M. Burchfiel, PhD, MPH and John M. Violanti, PhD59 CommentsTags ,

Truck Driver Safety and Health

Truck drivers face a disproportionately high risk for fatal crash-related injuries and for serious health disorders. The 2004 fatality rate for U.S. heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers was 48.2 per 100,000 workers, approximately 11 times the rate for the general worker population. The Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses estimated 63,570 non-fatal injuries among heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers in 2004—the second highest number among all occupations. Read More >

Posted on by Karl Sieber, PhD150 CommentsTags

Preventing Fire Fighter Fatalities from Cardiovascular Events

Some 1.1 million firefighters selflessly risk their own safety and health for our safety and the safety of our communities. Last month we saw this heroism first hand as over 7,000 firefighters battled the dangerous wildfires in Southern California. Fortunately, no fire fighters lost their lives but 130 suffered injuries as of November 2, according to media reports. It is an inherently dangerous job, but injuries, illnesses, and deaths should not be viewed or accepted as inevitable occurrences. NIOSH and other safety and fire service agencies work to protect fire fighters and prevent the estimated 100 fire fighter fatalities that occur each year. Through its Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program, NIOSH investigates the deaths of fire fighters in the line of duty to formulate science-based recommendations for preventing future deaths and injuries. Read More >

Posted on by John Howard, MD 14 CommentsTags ,
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