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Category: Women

Preventing Back Injuries in Health Care Settings

Healthcare workers often experience musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) at a rate exceeding that of workers in construction, mining, and manufacturing. These injuries are due in large part to repeated manual patient handling activities, often involving heavy manual lifting associated with transferring, and repositioning patients and working in extremely awkward postures. Read More >

Posted on by Jennifer Bell, PhD; Jim Collins, PhD, MSME; Traci L. Galinsky, PhD; Thomas R. Waters, PhD, CPE 123 CommentsTags , , ,

Violence Against Teachers and School Staff

Because of an increase in the prevalence of school-based policies aimed at reducing violence in youth and recent reports suggesting that teachers and other school staff may face daily threats of workplace violence, NIOSH was prompted to examine risk factors and prevention policies and practices for workplace violence for K-12 school staff. Read More >

Posted on by Administrator57 CommentsTags ,

Influenza Pandemic and the Protection of Healthcare Workers with Personal Protective Equipment

NIOSH is committed to ensuring that its research is relevant and making a difference in the lives of workers. As such, in 2005, NIOSH asked the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to form a standing committee to provide strategic guidance in addressing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) issues for workers. One issue the committee deemed of high importance is PPE for healthcare workers in the event of pandemic influenza. Read More >

Posted on by Administrator38 CommentsTags ,

Preventing Needlesticks in Surgical Personnel

Each year an estimated 385,000 needlesticks and other sharps-related injuries are sustained by hospital-based healthcare personnel; an average of 1,000 sharps injuries per day.  Read More >

Posted on by Walter Alarcon, MD, MSc6 CommentsTags ,

Contingent Workers

One analysis of 2005 federal data found that 16% of contingent workers have family incomes less than $20,000, a proportion twice as high as that of noncontingent workers. Only 13% of contingent workers had health insurance provided by their employer, compared with 72% of noncontingent workers. Read More >

Posted on by Kristin J. Cummings, MD, MPH, and Kathleen Kreiss, MD1 Comment
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