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Category: Safety and Health Data

Collecting Data on Worker Hearing Loss: Epidemiology in Action

Epidemiology is the art and science of using data to answer questions about the health of groups. In occupational epidemiology, we use that data to understand how work affects health.  This blog entry is part of a series that shares the stories behind the data. Hearing loss is one of the most common chronic health conditions Read More >

Posted on by Elizabeth Masterson, PhD, CPH, COHC8 Comments

Can Predictive Analytics Help Reduce Workplace Risk?

“Prediction is very difficult, especially if it’s about the future.” — Niels Bohr   Text message to chemical plant manager: Chlorine leak expected on line 2 tomorrow. Inspect and repair. High priority email and automatic call to coal mine superintendent: 83% chance of roof fall on section 4. Evacuate immediately and take corrective actions. Monthly Read More >

Posted on by Gregory R. Wagner, M.D.26 Comments

Connecting Occupational Public Health and Patient Care Through Electronic Health Records (EHRs)

This week is Health IT Week which recognizes efforts to improve the quality of healthcare delivery, increase patient safety, decrease medical errors, and strengthen the interaction between patients and healthcare providers via electronic health records (EHR).  NIOSH is working to improve occupational safety and health through health information technology. In 2007, NIOSH undertook a seemingly straightforward Read More >

Posted on by Margaret Filios, M.Sc., RN; Genevieve Barkocy Luensman, Ph.D.; John R Myers, MS; Marie Haring Sweeney, Ph.D.; Kerry Souza, Sc.D., MPH11 Comments

Including Work Information in Electronic Health Records

  Today’s “Health IT Buzz,” the blog of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), features a blog co-written by Kerry Souza of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and Michael Wittie of the ONC. Posted during “Health Center Week”, the blog highlights the Read More >

Posted on by Kerry Souza, ScD, MPH 2 Comments

A Voice in the Wilderness: Alice Hamilton and the Illinois Survey

Today, on Workers Memorial Day we remember those who died from work-related causes and take stock of what we still need to accomplish to reduce the toll of workplace injury, disease, and death. As we do this, it may be helpful to look back at how far we have come and remember one woman in Read More >

Posted on by Leslie Nickels, PhD, MEd7 Comments

Occupations with High Obesity Prevalence in Washington State

  If work and the workplace contribute to poor health behaviors, should employers attempt to improve those behaviors?  It likely is in the employer’s best interest to do so. Poor health behaviors can lead to chronic disease.  Workers with chronic disease may be at higher risk for workplace injury, have more absenteeism, and diminished productivity Read More >

Posted on by Wendy Lu, MPH; David Bonauto, MD, MPH; Joyce Fan, PhD;Casey Chosewood, MD; Sara E. Luckhaupt,MD, MPH 10 Comments

Using Workers’ Compensation Records for Safety and Health Research

Workers’ compensation insurance has been established in all states to provide income protection, medical treatment, and rehabilita­tion for employees who are injured or become ill as a result of work.  Workers’ compensation claims and medical treatment records along with other information resources have been used to conduct occupational safety and health research and surveillance and Read More >

Posted on by David F. Utterback, Ph.D.; Alysha R. Meyers, Ph.D., AEP; Steve Wurzelbacher, PhD, CPE, ARM55 Comments

What’s Next for the NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods

  Many products essential to daily life are produced using  chemicals that can endanger human health unless properly controlled.  While the end product may be safe for the consumer, the workers who manufacture the product may be occupationally exposed to the chemical ingredients more directly or at higher concentrations than the consumer who uses the Read More >

Posted on by Dale Shoemaker, PhD; Rosa Key-Schwartz, PhD; Gayle DeBord, PhD; and Yvonne Gagnon, MPH3 Comments
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