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Category: Healthcare

Assaults on Nursing Assistants

Recent NIOSH research finds that 35% of nursing assistants working in nursing homes reported injuries from aggression by residents and 12% reported human bites. These reports of workplace violence are even higher among those working in homes with special units for Alzheimer patients.  Read More >

Posted on by SangWoo Tak, ScD, MPH11 CommentsTags

Strains, Sprains, and Pains in Home Healthcare: Working in an Uncontrolled Environment

Home healthcare providers face an uncontrolled environment with each residence they enter. The most prevelant occupational injuries among them are strains and sprains. However, workers and employers can do many things to improve conditions and reduce injuries.  Read More >

Posted on by Traci Galinsky, PhD, and Garrett Burnett, MS, MBA54 Comments

N95 Respirators and Surgical Masks

The emergence of H1N1 has created considerable interest about the use of surgical masks and respirators as infection control measures. Given the recent issuance of revised CDC infection control guidance for healthcare personnel that include recommendations for use of N95 respirators, NIOSH has posted a new blog that examines the scientific principles behind the design and performance of these devices. Read More >

Posted on by Lisa Brosseau, ScD, and Roland Berry Ann143 CommentsTags

H1N1: Protecting Healthcare Workers

As of July 31, 2009, there were 162,380 documented cases of human infection with H1N1 throughout the world, including the United States. As of August 6, 2009, there were 6,506 hospitalized cases and 436 deaths in the U.S. From the time of its emergence earlier this year, H1N1 has prompted a concerted response from health agencies. Read More >

Posted on by Maryann D'Alessandro, PhD, and Ed Fries54 Comments

Preventing Back Injuries in Health Care Settings

Healthcare workers often experience musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) at a rate exceeding that of workers in construction, mining, and manufacturing. These injuries are due in large part to repeated manual patient handling activities, often involving heavy manual lifting associated with transferring, and repositioning patients and working in extremely awkward postures. Read More >

Posted on by Jennifer Bell, PhD; Jim Collins, PhD, MSME; Traci L. Galinsky, PhD; Thomas R. Waters, PhD, CPE 123 CommentsTags , , ,

References for Preventing Back Injuries in Health Care Settings

References Return to the blog entry 1. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2007, Incidence rates for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work per 10,000 full-time workers by industry and selected events or exposures leading to injury or illness, 2006. U.S. Department of Labor. Washington, DC. 2. State of Washington [2006]. An act Read More >

Posted on by Administrator

Influenza Pandemic and the Protection of Healthcare Workers with Personal Protective Equipment

NIOSH is committed to ensuring that its research is relevant and making a difference in the lives of workers. As such, in 2005, NIOSH asked the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to form a standing committee to provide strategic guidance in addressing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) issues for workers. One issue the committee deemed of high importance is PPE for healthcare workers in the event of pandemic influenza. Read More >

Posted on by Administrator38 CommentsTags ,

Preventing Needlesticks in Surgical Personnel

Each year an estimated 385,000 needlesticks and other sharps-related injuries are sustained by hospital-based healthcare personnel; an average of 1,000 sharps injuries per day.  Read More >

Posted on by Walter Alarcon, MD, MSc6 CommentsTags ,
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