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Category: Emergency Response/Public Sector

Cops and Cars

Police officer line-of-duty deaths have increased 40% from 2009 to 2010. Traffic-related incidents are the leading cause of death among our nation's law enforcement officers. Help NIOSH better understand police officer attitudes and beliefs about motor-vehicle safety practices by providing input.  Read More >

Posted on by Hope M. Tiesman, PhD, and Rebecca Heick, PhD42 Comments

NIOSH’s Role in the Deepwater Horizon Response

Following the explosion on the Deepwater Horizon and the resulting and ongoing oil spill, occupational health specialists from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) arrived on site in the Gulf on May 2, 2010, as part of the federal interagency effort to anticipate and address occupational and environmental health and safety needs in the Gulf Coast. Read More >

Posted on by Jim Spahr, MPH22 Comments

Respiratory Protection for Terrorist Threats and Other Emergencies

This September 11th marks eight years since the devastating attacks on the World Trade Center. Since then, NIOSH has developed a systematic approach to identify the hazards that responders would face, assess the capabilities of existing respiratory protection equipment to provide protection against viable threats using benchmark testing, and set certification standards that stretch the capabilities of the protective technologies to enhance the protection offered to responders during CBRN events. Read More >

Posted on by Jonathan V. Szalajda, MS3 Comments

Using No-nose (Noseless) Bicycle Saddles to Prevent Genital Numbness and Sexual Dysfunction

Over 40,000 workers including police officers, emergency medical technicians, and security staff ride bicycles as part of their job. Research has shown that riding with a traditional bicycle saddle can create pressure in the groin and may lead to a loss of sensation and a decrease in blood supply to the genitals. No-nose bicycle saddles can significantly reduce this pressure and alleviate the resulting negative health consequences. Read More >

Posted on by Steven M. Schrader, PhD, Brian D. Lowe, PhD, Michael J. Breitenstein, BS60 CommentsTags ,

Improved Criteria for Emergency Medical Protective Clothing

Over one million firefighters and an additional 500,000 emergency medical technicians and other first responders are engaged in emergency medical service (EMS) operations. NIOSH research has led to revised standards for personal protective equipment for EMS workers and, in turn, the development of new equipment and products providing a level of protection not previously available to the nation's EMS responders.  Read More >

Posted on by Administrator6 Comments

Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program

In 1998 the NIOSH Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program was created to conduct independent investigations of fire fighter line of duty deaths and to formulate recommendations for preventing future deaths and injuries. As NIOSH enters the 10th year of the Fire Fighter Program we are working to better reach small and rural fire departments with the results of our fatality investigation reports and prevention recommendations. We request your assistance in helping us achieve this goal. Read More >

Posted on by Administrator9 CommentsTags

Respiratory Health Consequences Resulting from the Collapse of the World Trade Center

As we mark seven years since the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, guest blogger Dr. Prezant of the World Trade Center Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program and Albert Einstein College of Medicine discusses the respiratory health consequences resulting from the collapse of the World Trade Center. Read More >

Posted on by Administrator10 CommentsTags

Introduction: Respiratory Health Consequences Resulting from the Collapse of the World Trade Center

As we mark seven years since the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, guest blogger Dr. Prezant of the World Trade Center Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program and Albert Einstein College of Medicine discusses the respiratory health consequences resulting from the collapse of the World Trade Center. Read More >

Posted on by AdministratorTags
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