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Category: Dermal Exposure

Occupational Exposures to New Drycleaning Solvents

Drycleaning There are about 36,000 commercial drycleaning shops in the United States. Most are owner-operated small businesses with fewer than 10 employees. In addition, some drycleaning shops may be owned and staffed by individuals with limited English language skills and/or may be marginally profitable– factors that may create additional barriers for the owner-operator to maintain a Read More >

Posted on by Diana Ceballos, PhD, MS, CIH; Stephen Whittaker, PhD; and Eun Gyung Lee, PhD, CIH 7 Comments

NIOSH’s Role in the Deepwater Horizon Response

Following the explosion on the Deepwater Horizon and the resulting and ongoing oil spill, occupational health specialists from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) arrived on site in the Gulf on May 2, 2010, as part of the federal interagency effort to anticipate and address occupational and environmental health and safety needs in the Gulf Coast. Read More >

Posted on by Jim Spahr, MPH22 Comments

Skin…Exposed!

Dermal exposures are often given a back seat when chemicals are tested for toxicity or personal protective equipment is designed. However, skin diseases account for 15-20% of all reported occupational diseases in the United States. They result in costs estimated at $1 billion annually.  Read More >

Posted on by Scott Dotson, PhD, and Garrett Burnett, MS, MBA19 Comments

Preventing Health Hazards from Metal Working Fluids

Metal working fluids are used to lubricate, cool, prevent corrosion of, and remove chips from tools and metal parts during grinding, cutting, or boring operations. There are several types of MWFs: straight or soluble oils, semisynthetic oils, and synthetic oils. Exposures to MWFs can occur through inhaling aerosols, skin contact with contaminated surfaces, and splashing of fluids. Employees who have been exposed to MWFs often report skin disorders (skin irritations, oil acne, and rashes); eye, nose, and throat irritation; and respiratory symptoms (cough, asthma, or other breathing problems). Read More >

Posted on by Administrator18 CommentsTags
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