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Selected Category: Healthcare-associated infections

Dr. Peter Pronovost on CDC’s Vital Signs Report: Why Success was Possible

Categories: Antimicrobial Resistance, BSIs, CLABSI, Dialysis, Healthcare-associated infections, MRSA, NHSN

Dr. Peter Pronovost on CDC’s Vital Signs Report: Why Success was Possible

Dr. Peter Pronovost on CDC’s Vital Signs Report: Why Success was Possible

Dr. Peter Pronovost, Johns Hopkins University, provides three video commentaries on CDC’s recent Vital Signs report on central line-associated bloodstream infections in hospitals and dialysis facilities. Dr. Pronovost’s commentary is provided below. Click on the video to watch

Transcript: Why was success possible?

Success was possible because many groups partnered and worked collaboratively.

On the national level, the CDC, AHRQ, CMS, and Health and Human Services all worked together.

At the state level, state hospital associations, state health departments and quality improvement organizations united forces.

And within hospitals, ICU clinicians, infection preventionists, and hospital managers worked together.

Dr. Peter Pronovost on CDC’s Vital Signs Report: How we can work together to leverage our success

Categories: Antimicrobial Resistance, BSIs, CLABSI, Dialysis, Healthcare-associated infections, MRSA, NHSN

Dr. Peter Pronovost on CDC’s Vital Signs Report: How we can work together to leverage our success

Dr. Peter Pronovost on CDC’s Vital Signs Report: How we can work together to leverage our success

Dr. Peter Pronovost, Johns Hopkins University, provides three video commentaries on CDC’s recent Vital Signs report on central line-associated bloodstream infections in hospitals and dialysis facilities. Dr. Pronovost’s commentary is provided below. Click on the video to watch.

Transcript: How we can work together to leverage our success

So what can we do:

“US government – work together to mature the science and develop safety programs – programs with clear evidence for best practices, programs with measures that clinicians believe are valid, programs that deliver results, programs that help clinicians believe they can truly make a difference.

States – coordinate efforts, create infrastructure to implement the science, provide technical support to hospitals seeking to measure and reduce infections, and ensure that all hospitals that have not eliminated CLABSI participate in the national program called On the CUSP: Stop BSI.

Dr. Peter Pronovost on CDC’s Vital Signs Report: Where do we go from here?

Categories: Antimicrobial Resistance, BSIs, CLABSI, Dialysis, Healthcare-associated infections, MRSA, NHSN

Dr. Peter Pronovost on CDC’s Vital Signs Report: Where do we go from here?

Dr. Peter Pronovost on CDC’s Vital Signs Report: Where do we go from here?

Dr. Peter Pronovost, Johns Hopkins University, provides three video commentaries on CDC’s recent Vital Signs report on central line-associated bloodstream infections in hospitals and dialysis facilities. Dr. Pronovost’s commentary is provided below. Click on the video to watch.

Transcript: Where do we go from here?

“We must ensure that all patients in ICUs receive best practices. We have seen dramatic reductions in infections in all types of ICUs – teaching and community, large and small, urban and rural. Yet the results are patchy. Some ICUs remain with high CLABSI rates.

We must apply these lessons to reduce other types of preventable harm such as ventilator-associated pneumonia.

NHSN Trainings Fill Gap in Region VIII

Categories: Healthcare-associated infections, NHSN

Author – Zachary Taylor, MD, MS
Regional Health Administrator, Region VIII
U.S. Department of Health and Humans Services

Healthcare-associated infection (HAI) prevention resources vary a great deal across HHS Region VIII, which includes Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming. Some states have longstanding programs in place, while others need support to strengthen basic program infrastructure, communications, lab capacity, and data collection systems.

Last May, my region secured a grant from the HHS Office of Healthcare Quality to address the gap. I asked states their top needs for HAI reduction. Each state identified the same priority: training on use of the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), which is the CDC’s system for national surveillance of HAIs.

Many hospitals in Region VIII need to continue to provide training to their healthcare personnel and to assure successful uptake of prevention initiatives. Development of state surveillance training competencies through local trainings for appropriate use of surveillance systems like NHSN is an important part of this. Plus, facilities are incentivized to report their central line-associated blood stream infection rates through NHSN starting in January 2011, and their surgical site infection rates starting in January 2012 because of CMS’s new rule tying reimbursement rates to infection reporting.

Regional Projects Spur Creative Strategies for HAI Prevention Across US

Categories: Dialysis, Healthcare-associated infections, NHSN, Outpatient Care

HHS Region Map

HHS Region Map

Author – Rani Jeeva
Team Leader for Healthcare-Associated Infections
HHS Office of Healthcare Quality

HAI elimination is a top priority for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The HHS Steering Committee for the Prevention of Healthcare-Associated Infections was established in July 2008 with the charge to develop a comprehensive strategy to prevent and reduce HAIs. The result was the Action Plan to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections, which outlines national goals for prevention and key actions for achieving them. 

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