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APIC promotes “Infection Prevention and You”

Categories: HAI Guidelines, Healthcare-associated infections

Infection Prevention and You banner

Guest Author – Vicki G. Allen, MSN, RN, CIC
Manager of the Infection Prevention and Control Department
CaroMont Regional Medical Center

This year APIC is marking International Infection Prevention Week (IIPW), October 20-26, by launching a multiyear campaign themed "Infection Prevention and You.” The focus is to engage everyone — patients, families, and healthcare personnel — in infection prevention, as well as to promote a voice and a partnership toward receiving quality and safe patient care.

APIC’s new Infection Prevention and You APIC’s new “Infection Prevention and You” website will be continually updated and revised to reflect the most current information. For example, we recently added a page on preventing infection in the locker room. One section of the website is geared to patients and families, and the other is geared to healthcare personnel who are not necessarily infection preventionists. The resources are aimed at helping everyone understand their role in infection prevention and patient safety. The website includes tips and tools including a new infographic [PDF - 1.25 MB] that depicts how patients and families [PDF - 554 KB] can play an active role, what healthcare-associated infections [PDF - 491 KB] are, and what infection preventionists do to keep patients safe.

We all have a vested interest in patient safety and infection prevention. This new website provides easy access to information for all users! To keep abreast of the ever changing world of pathogens, and receive information you can use to educate your audiences, don’t forget to sign up for APIC’s monthly newsletter on infection prevention. This is a great way to keep up with the latest news in the infection prevention world and to receive helpful tips and recommendations on keeping you and your loved ones healthy and infection-free!

So, what can you do to help? Check out the website, share with your friends, and make sure to “Like” APIC’s new Facebook page.

Thanks for all you do to advance patient safety!

Public Comments

Comments listed below are posted by individuals not associated with CDC, unless otherwise stated. These comments do not represent the official views of CDC, and CDC does not guarantee that any information posted by individuals on this blog is correct, and disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on any such information. Read more about our comment policy ».

  1. October 22, 2013 at 11:03 am ET  -   Sergio Aguilar M.D., M.P.H.

    Is true that prevention of hospital infections is important but the home infection prevention is also important (a poster for home use). Because its importance in public health a poster with the following points could be constructed (just written in http://consumers.site.apic.org/infection-prevention-in/your-home )
    1) Wash or sanitize your hands
    2) Use safe cooking practices.
    3) Don’t share personal items.
    4) Do not place purses or diaper bags on the kitchen table,
    5) Keep pet environments clean:
    a) Remember to prevent pets from drinking out of the toilet.
    b) Keep pets vaccinated and bathed, and clean up accidents promptly.
    c) Provide clean bedding, water, and food dishes.
    d) Protect your pet and your family and keep disease out of your home by preventing fleas, ticks, and other pests from getting in.
    6) Clean and disinfect frequently touched
    7) Avoid clutter
    8) Organize your cleaning supplies
    9) Make it a family affair
    Thanks

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  2. October 22, 2013 at 9:21 am ET  -   Errol Prasad

    Keep ALL your vaccinations up-to-date. This prevents acquisition and transmission of vaccine-preventable diseases.

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  3. October 22, 2013 at 9:18 am ET  -   Marva L. Hull

    Things are getting better with emphasis on getting,but still you see the same old stethescope hung around a doctors neck traveling from room to room touching each patient as it carefully listens to breath sounds,and that tie [male dr.] travels right along with them making rounds and germs.Why if you can get a private room you can’t seem to get a private stethescope?this has always been a pet peeve of mine,no doctor should be allowed to have a stethescope on his person,they should come with the supplies the patient gets upon admission to be used only on that patient,necks and pockets are not sterile holders they are germ holders.I won’t even mention the Dentist office staff as they are clueless and think one pair of gloves can be used,to do this and that touch this and that and then put into your mouth.We need more teaching about what damage hands and gloves can so if used improperly,the days of thinking the gloves are there to protect your hands[staff] and not the patient need to be addressed and updated for todays germ filled world.

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