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Data for Action: Tracking Infections

Categories: ARRA, CLABSI, Healthcare-associated infections, NHSN, State HAI Prevention

Dr. Scott Fridkin

Dr. Scott Fridkin

CDC’s Dr. Scott Fridkin
Deputy Chief of DHQP’s Surveillance Branch
Author of Today’s State-Specific Healthcare-Associated Infections Report

As you may know, CDC captures and regularly releases national healthcare-associated infection (HAI) data through our National Healthcare Safety Network, a system that monitors infections at 2,800-plus healthcare facilities across the nation. Most recently, though, the NHSN team has been working to analyze and report HAI data at the state level, and some of our work was released today in a report called the First State-Specific Healthcare-Associated Infections Summary Data Report.

This report includes national HAI data from states with mandates to publicly report central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and represents the first time CDC has released state-specific data. It’s also the first time we’ve used a measure called the standardized infection ratio (SIR) to summarize state or national data. Nationally, we saw an 18 percent decrease in CLABSIs. State results were encouraging as well, with most states showing lower than expected SIRs.

This week, we also released HAI plans submitted by states and U.S. territories. As states and territories move forward with implementing their plans, future SIR reports will allow them to track and improve progress over time.

Together, these pieces give us a snapshot of where we stand as a nation and will allow us to track progress over time toward goals in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Action Plan to Prevent HAIs.

What’s the next step? We plan to release SIR reports twice a year to help states monitor their progress over time. Future reports will include other infection types (such as surgical site infections) and all states. The more we dig into HAI data, the better we can tailor our prevention efforts. Our goal – to make healthcare as safe as possible.

Public Comments

Comments listed below are posted by individuals not associated with CDC, unless otherwise stated. These comments do not represent the official views of CDC, and CDC does not guarantee that any information posted by individuals on this blog is correct, and disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on any such information. Read more about our comment policy ».

  1. June 3, 2010 at 6:30 pm ET  -   CK

    Sorry, did not realize the numbers change. Was referring to the comment dated 5-27-10 Simms

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  2. June 3, 2010 at 6:28 pm ET  -   CK

    Comment number five raises the question, “if you had a personal experience with this, how did you handle it?” What did you do to protect or help the patient? Maybe we can learn from that.

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  3. June 3, 2010 at 8:01 am ET  -   JEAN AGAN

    It is wonderful to know that long term care is being included, and that our voices may be heard. We want the care we render, in addition to being homelike, warm and resident centered, to be top of the line and to adhere to the highest standard. We want to be on the cutting edge of preventing HAI. Thank you again for putting us in the loop at the beginning. That is how we grow, learn and become leaders in the industry. Together we can!

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  4. May 31, 2010 at 5:30 pm ET  -   Michael E. Bailey

    The First State Specific Report is a good baseline for one kind of healthcare associated infection. And it is important that CDC is putting a spotlight on this issue. Now it will be important for hospitals to take specific, concrete steps to reduce these infections in their facilities. These infections must be reduced to the lowest amount possible, eliminated from the hospitals if possible. But I also agree with an other writer that voiced a concern that some hospitals may try to cut costs and deflate their statistics by simply moving infected patients to other parts of the hospital other than ICU. Hospitals need to report each instance of these bloodlinfe infections, not just those that are admitted to ICU. Having to report each instance of healthcare related bloodline infection regardless of what part of the hospital a patient is located in will create a powerful incentive for the hospital to do everything it can to try and reduce the causes of infection instead of moving pateints to general medical wards or other places where the hospital may not have to do a report. I think this is one health related infection the report looked at but there are other types of hfealthcare related infections and they also need a spotlight on them so their incidence can be reduced to the lowest level possible. Best wishes, Michael E. Bailey.

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  5. May 27, 2010 at 11:38 pm ET  -   COLLEEN S.

    I TOO HAVE FIRST HAND KNOWLEDGE OF THIS KIND OF PRACTICE. MY SON WAS ADMITTED IN A REGULAR MEDICAL ROOM, ALTHOUGH THE STAFF WAS WELL AWARE OF HIS LEGS & TORSO WERE WEEPING & BLOOD INFECTION, TO A ROOM WERE TWO PATIENCE HAD PASSED AWAY IN, FROM COMPLICATIONS DUE TO MRSA/SEPSIS. I NOW KNOW THAT THEY SHOULD HAVE PUT HIM IN ICU INSTEAD. HE PASSED AWAY LAST SEPTEMBER 26, 2009, DUE TO SEPTIC SHOCK…HIS ORGANS HAD SHUT DOWN ONE-BY-ONE UNTIL THE END, OVER A PERIOD OF A FEW MONTHS. HE HAD BEEN SEEN SEVERAL TIMES BY ER DOCTORS FROM JUNE OF 2008~HE WAS CUT ON HIS LEFT CALF BY A RUSTY NAIL , WHILE HELPING WITH REMOVAL OF DAMAGED ITEMS FROM A STILL PARTIALLY FLOODED BASEMENT, (DURING THE FLOODS HERE IN IA)! I JUST DON’T UNDERSTAND HOW THEY COUD HAVE MISSED WHAT WAS REALLY WRONG, INSTEAD THE STARTED TREATING EACH FAILING ORGAN! I PRAY THAT TOGETHER WE CAN STOP THESE KINDS OF OVERSITES! HE HAD JUST TURNED 31 YRS YOUNG~
    WE THANK YOU FOR ALL YOUR EFFORTS IN RESOLVING THESE PROBLEMS!
    ONE BROKEN HEARTED MOM

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  6. May 27, 2010 at 5:49 pm ET  -   emt

    this post is very usefull thx!

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  7. May 27, 2010 at 2:43 pm ET  -   Margaret Sims

    I suspect hospitals are going to find ways to circumvent the reporting of peripheral line infections by not admitting patients with infecttions to ICU…if they can help it. I have personal experinece with one such case. The patient was septic yet was admitted to a medical floor with an infected mediport. I strongly suggest you look into this practice.

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