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Decade of Progress: Gaps to Address (Part 2 of 2)

Categories: Decennial, HICPAC, Healthcare-associated infections, NHSN

Scott Fridkin Co-Chair of the Decennial Scientific Program Committee

Challenges before us…

  1. Making HAI tracking and reporting efforts feasible & sustainable in all hospitals
  2. Expanding detection and prevention efforts within outpatient settings
  3. Finding new treatment and prevention strategies for serious pathogens

I agree, Vicky.

In the last 10 years, we have seen accelerated progress in infection prevention in acute care facilities. Hospitals are implementing bundles of prevention strategies, using checklists based on HICPAC guidelines, and reinventing a culture of safety within their facilities. Importantly, more than 2,600 hospitals are tracking infections to monitor progress and better target infection prevention efforts.

However, several challenges now lie before us. These include: making HAI tracking and reporting efforts feasible and sustainable in all hospitals, expanding detection and prevention efforts within outpatient settings, and finding new treatment and prevention strategies for serious pathogens. These three issues will likely prove to be our biggest obstacles to tackle in the coming decade.

Defining the goal of elimination motivates us to stretch our thinking. The Decennial will explore both what we know and do well, and what we still need to know or do.

In essence, the Decennial is an opportunity to re-define the field of infection prevention and patient safety with our traditional partners and many new active partners. As this is done, all of us can accelerate progress toward the next level of infection prevention and realize a newer, safer, healthcare delivery system we all can be proud of.

Public Comments

Comments listed below are posted by individuals not associated with CDC, unless otherwise stated. These comments do not represent the official views of CDC, and CDC does not guarantee that any information posted by individuals on this blog is correct, and disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on any such information. Read more about our comment policy ».

  1. May 6, 2010 at 3:20 pm ET  -   COLLEEN S

    I’VE BEEN READING THROUGH THE BLOG COMMENTS AND SEE THAT THERE ARE SEVERAL ISSUES THAT ARE BEING ADDRESSED, BUT ARE THEY BEING USED IN THE HOSPITALS, HEALTH FACILITIES, ETC.? IS THERE A GROUP THAT TRACKS WHAT THE HOSPITALS, ETC ARE DOING TO CHANGE THERE OLD PRACTICES. ALSO, IS THERE ANY EDUCATION CLASSES FOR THEM SO THEY CAN BETTER IDENTIFY THE INFECTION VISUALLY~ PATIENCE WITH & WITHOUT SYMPTOMS? I AM VERY CONCERNED WITH THIS ISSUE, I LOST MY ONLY CHILD, MY SON, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009, DUE TO THE “SUPERBUG”! WE ALL NEED TO DO OUR PART IN MAKING SURE WE GET A CONTROL ON THIS INFECTION!
    BEST REGARDS,
    COLLEEN S.

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  2. March 26, 2010 at 11:35 pm ET  -   Michael E. Bailey

    The two places in the hospital that are incubators of HAIs, the biggest ones, are probably the outpatient clinic and the emergency room. There was a hospital in South Central Los Angeles that had all kinds of problems with HAIs, staff problems, training problems. Not even changing ownership could save this facility and finally it was downgraded from a hospital to an outpatient clinic facility. In some ways closing the hospital was safer for the patients because they could be served by other hospitals with higher motivated staff and better equipment. In some ways it was bad for patients because when this facilitiy’s emergency room closed, that meant patients needing emergency care had a longer distance to travel to get to it. And the HAIs in the outpatient department have maybe been at least brought under control by the new management. Health information technology will play an important roll in reducing HAIs because the Health IT is better able to keep more detailed and up to the minute tracking of patients conditions and detect any changes at an early stage when they will be easier to deal with. Best wishes, Michael E. Bailey.

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