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Decade of Progress: Gaps to Address (Part 1 of 2)

Categories: Decennial, Healthcare-associated infections

The Decennial theme, “Changing paradigms in infection prevention: towards elimination of adverse events” begs the question -- Is elimination finally feasible?Vicky Fraser Co-Chair of the Decennial Scientific Program Committee

It is hard to believe that the Decennial Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs) is here this week. Although we have been planning this meeting for the past two years, so much has changed in the area of HAI prevention during this period, not to mention the past decade.

What is most exciting is the addition of new partners who have joined efforts in this field, including state and local public health departments, other federal agencies, and even consumers. This conference will be an opportunity for experts from around the globe to come together to share experiences, best practices and vision related to one of the most significant healthcare challenges of our time – eliminating HAIs.

Now in its 50th year, the Decennial Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections will bring together more than 3,000 scientists and healthcare professionals to explore a highly diverse scientific program. This year’s theme, “Changing paradigms in infection prevention: towards elimination of adverse events,” begs the question – Is elimination finally feasible?

Public Comments

Comments listed below are posted by individuals not associated with CDC, unless otherwise stated. These comments do not represent the official views of CDC, and CDC does not guarantee that any information posted by individuals on this blog is correct, and disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on any such information. Read more about our comment policy ».

  1. October 7, 2010 at 4:31 pm ET  -   Karen Elarde-mCCuaig

    I am wondering what measures at the front desks of hospitals and clinics people are doing to control the spread of bedbugs?

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  2. April 7, 2010 at 2:03 pm ET  -   jean

    MUCH GOOD INFORNATION ABOUT HOSPITALS, BUT DON’T FORGET ABOUT NURSING HOMES. PARTICULARLY IN SMALL RURAL AREAS, HOSPITAL MAY BE ON ONE SIDE OF STREET AND NURSING HOME ON THE OTHER. WE ALL TAKE CARE OF THE SAME FOLKS BUT MUST BECAUSE OF OUR RESIDENT POPULATION DO SOME THING DIFFERENTLY- PLEASE HELP NURSING HOMES DEAL WITH HAI TOO, BUT IN AN ENVIRONMENT THAT IS HOMELIKE AND MUST BE- THANX FOR LISTENING

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  3. March 26, 2010 at 11:11 pm ET  -   Michael E. Bailey

    Healthcare Associated Infections can be eliminated or at least be greatly cut back now. It takes proper care and cleaning and maintenance and inspection of the equipment. It is less a technical issue and more of a financial one. Does the healthcare industry really want to spend the money necessary to eliminate HAI? The newest state-of-the-art hospitals with the most advanced medical information technology and latest medical equipment are probably the ones that are also the safest and healthiest to be a patient or staff member in. Such facilities are also tremendously expensive. Hospitals that want to reinvent themselves from the ground up with the newest equipment and facilities almost have to be part of a major national medical corporation like Kaiser Permanente or part of a state university system to afford to do it. It would be interesting to compare incidents of HAIs in hospitals with the areas the hospitals are located in such as low income neighborhoods, rural areas, middle and upper income areas. Best wishes, Michael E. Bailey.

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