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Public Health Spotlight: Matt McDaniel

Categories: Anthrax, General, Preparedness

ExerciseBy: Diana Yassanye

Workers from the county health department calmly walk door to door putting little bags into mailboxes as they move through the quiet suburban neighborhood. In less than two hours, the team has delivered those bags to 1500 mailboxes, nearly 4500 residents.  In each bag is a bottle of antibiotics that provides protection from the inhalational anthrax that was released in town by some very bad people. The residents who have those antibiotics in their mailboxes can stay home for a few more days, buying time for public health, healthcare, and law enforcement officials to determine who is at risk from the deadly biological agent and who will need more medication.

Sound like a new blockbuster movie?

Project Wildfire: A Community Approach to Surviving Wildfires

Categories: General, Natural Disasters, Preparedness, Response

 

Wildfires burning brush and treesBy Kate Lighthall

Project Wildfire in Deschutes County, Oregon has been recognized by CDC’s Office of Public Health Preparedness and Responses’ (OPHPR) Learning Office and the CDC Foundation as a community effort that reflects and embodies FEMA’s Whole Community approach to emergency management.

Although central Oregon experiences other natural and man-made disasters, wildfires are by far the biggest threat here, especially during the summer months.  In an average year, we experience 450 fires that burn 50,000 acres and homes, threaten lives and impact the economy.  Following two devastating wildfires that burned in Bend, Oregon in 1990 and again in 1996, the Fire Chief of Deschutes County, Oregon, Gary Marshall, received a phone call from Safeco Insurance offering to contribute to the purchase of new firefighting equipment. Marshall politely declined Safeco’s offer because he had a more effective, long-term solution in mind that involved educating the public about the risks of wildfires.

Dragon*Con 2012 – From a Noob Perspective

Categories: General, Preparedness, Response, Zombies

crowd of people moving through the hotel at DragonConBy Kara Stephens

When I offered to coordinate CDC/PHPR’s participation at this year’s Dragon*Con, I truly did not grasp how big of an event it is.   Dragon*Con is considered the largest pop culture convention in the universe – and while trying to navigate through the crowd of roughly fifty two thousand sci-fi, fantasy, gaming, and science enthusiasts the enormity of the event quickly became apparent.

How to Apply Your 5k Training to a Disease Outbreak

Categories: Disease Investigation, Disease Outbreak, Response

 

Runners leaving start line during a race

By Jeff Eggert

It is another beautiful Denver morning. The sun is shining, and Canadian geese are honking in 40 degree weather. A large crowd has begun to gather in the center of a park, huddled around hot coffee and warm bagels while yellow-vested volunteers quickly triage individuals in the crowd towards the appropriate registration line. The Incident Commander holds a last minute briefing with Denver Police Department, Denver Health Paramedic Division and Denver Parks and Recreation covering everything from “securing the perimeter” to “ensuring client and volunteer safety.”

Outbreak Investigation: Meningitis

Categories: Disease Investigation, Disease Outbreak, General, Response

CDC scientist looks through microscope at fungus displayed on screenOne Case Sparks National Action

Imagine… A patient goes to the doctor for a routine steroid injection.   A couple weeks later, the patient feels sick – headache, fever and suddenly uncomfortable in bright light.  Within days, the patient is admitted to the local hospital’s intensive care unit.  Doctors discover that the patient has a life-threatening disease they’ve never treated before. 

Can Your Pet Sense Disasters?

Categories: General, Natural Disasters, Preparedness

 

boy and girl each hugging a dog and smiling

By Regina Quadir

Imagine your dog starts barking and hides under a table right before an earthquake rattles your house.  Is your dog psychic?  The idea that animals can predict earthquakes and other natural disasters is not a new phenomenon.  Scientists have been exploring this topic for years, investigating whether animals possess a sixth sense that allows them to predict natural disasters.  

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