Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Public Health Matters Blog

Sharing our stories on preparing for and responding to public health events

Share
Compartir

Selected Category: Response

Helping Children Cope With a Disaster

Categories: General, Natural Disasters, Preparedness, Response

David J Schonfeld, MD, FAAP

Children often become distressed after a disaster, especially if it has directly impacted them or someone they care about.  They may also feel sad or sorry for others and want very much to help them.  Worries that something similar will happen to them or their family may lead them to ask a lot of questions so that they can better understand what has happened and therefore what they can do to protect themselves and their family.  Parents and other adults who care for children can do a lot to help them understand and cope.

On the Scene: Wildfire Communication in Colorado

Categories: General, Natural Disasters, Response

By Nicole Hawk

An estimated 75,000 wildfires occur in the United States each year, and each one has potential public health concerns including evacuating safely, dealing with smoke, or cleaning up spoiled food after a power outage.  In June 2013, Colorado faced multiple devastating wildfires, including the Royal Gorge Fire in Cañon City, which required the evacuation of a state prison, and the Black Forest Fire in Colorado Springs, which became the most destructive in Colorado history. 

Do 1 Thing: Family Communication Plan

Categories: Do 1 Thing, General, Natural Disasters, Preparedness, Response

By Cate Shockey

This blog is part of a series, covering a preparedness topic each month from the Do 1 Thing Program . Join us this month as we discuss family communication plans.

For Do 1 Thing this month, it was time to sit down and create a family communication plan. The point is to be able to communicate with family members during a disaster.

Animal Rescue: Caring for Animals During Emergencies

Categories: Natural Disasters, Preparedness, Response

Working with TF 1 USAR dogs at Disaster City

In 2008, Hurricane Ike devastated the upper Texas coast with many animals lost and many more suffering needlessly.  This storm triggered a request for the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences to form a deployable veterinary emergency team. 

Emergency Preparedness for Families with Special Needs

Categories: General, Natural Disasters, Preparedness, Response

close up image of a school bus with handicap sign

By Georgina Peacock

When Hurricane Katrina hit, Julie thought she was ready.  She always had an emergency kit prepared because her son Zac needs medical supplies and equipment to keep him happy and healthy. Zac has spina bifida, a major birth defect of the spine; hydrocephalus, which means he has extra fluid in and around the brain; and, a number of food and drug allergies. He has sensitivities to changes in temperature and barometric pressure. Therefore, she always made sure they had a week’s worth of supplies and medicine ready when it was time to evacuate. “There is a very delicate medical balance,” she said.  “When he has an issue, the dominos tend to fall quickly.”

Coping with Disasters

Categories: General, Natural Disasters, Preparedness, Response

Storm Damage - tree down in the road

Whether you live in tornado alley or in a hurricane-prone coastal region, it’s important to include emotional wellness activities in your diaster plan. Severe weather and evacuations can cause emotional distress such as anxiety, worry, and fear in both adults and children. Although no one can plan for a disaster, you can practice healthy coping skills by following these tips.

Older Posts Newer Posts

Pages in this Blog
  1. 1
  2. [2]
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. >>
 
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO
A-Z Index
  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #