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Do 1 Thing: First Aid

Categories: Do 1 Thing, General, Natural Disasters, Preparedness

ambulance driving

By Cate Shockey

This blog is part of a series, covering a preparedness topic each month from the Do 1 Thing Program . Join us this month to discuss first aid.

We’ve all done it. Bumps and bruises are commonplace in every day life.  Usually a band-aid and some antiseptic is the right treatment to get the job done.  But if an emergency happens and you have to call for an ambulance, do you know what to do while you wait?  Do you have the supplies you need to do basic first aid?  Or the training to perform CPR?

first aid kitI’m definitely accident prone.  I even carry a first aid kit in my purse.  I often find bruises on my body and have no idea where they came from… mostly because I run in to things so often that I can’t remember which collision caused which bruise.  But in an emergency, my little purse first aid kit isn’t going to be enough. 

This month, I rooted through my medicine cabinet and put together a solid first aid kit.  You’d be surprised what you already have, scattered about.  By putting it all in one place, you’ll be able to find what you need when you need it.  Here are a few items to include in your first aid kit:

  • Ace bandanges
  • Adhesive tape roll
  • Antibiotic ointment
  • Aspirin
  • Band-aids in assorted sizes
  • Cold pack
  • Cotton swabs
  • Disposable gloves
  • Gauze
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Hydrogen peroxide to wash and disinfect wounds
  • Needle and thread
  • Plastic bags
  • Safety pins
  • Sanitary napkins
  • Scissors and tweezers
  • Splinting materials
  • Thermometer

prescription pill bottlesAnd don’t forget medications!  Keep a copy of all your prescription medications and, if possible, an extra supply of your required medications so that you don’t run out.  Here’s a full list of items for your first aid kit.  Figure out what you need and begin there.  

Other great first aid steps you can take this month:

  • Take training in first aid, CPR, or AED.  Knowing how to spot symptoms and perform emergency aid can save a life.  Contact your local fire department or Red Cross to learn what classes are available in your area. Many of these classes are free!
  • Did you know you can take pet first aid?  Pets require different types of first aid, and different first aid kit items.  Learn how to help your furry friend in an emergency.
  • Teach young children in your house how to call 911 and what to tell the dispatcher. 
  • Important medical information and most prescriptions can be stored in the refrigerator, which also provides excellent protection from fires.

Check out Do 1 Thing for more tips and information, and start putting your plans in place for unexpected events. Are YOU ready?

Do you have a first aid supplies in your emergency kit?  What medical supplies does your family need?  Leave a comment and let us know!

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